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Modelling Climate-Neutral Energy Systems and Markets

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "B: Energy and Environment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020) | Viewed by 9626

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, E3MLab, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytechniou Street, Zografou, 15773 Athens, Greece
Interests: applied economics; mathematical modelling for economic growth; energy markets and climate change
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate (or GHG) neutrality is equivalent to the net phase-out of all GHG emissions, and carbon neutrality is a similar concept, but only for CO2 emissions. Climate neutrality of a fuel or energy vector implies zero GHG emissions over its entire lifecycle, considering that carbon sinks are naturally occurring during the formation of the raw feedstock used for its production.

The Paris Agreement has the goal to limit the global temperature rise to 1.5 oC, implying a GHG emissions phase-out around 2050. For this purpose, the European Commission proposed in November 2019 a long-term strategy targeting emissions reduction in 2050 at 95% GHG and more. Therefore, possible ways to reach climate neutrality in the EU energy system came up on the policy agenda.

Energy system modeling for achieving carbon neutrality in the entire system is the topic of the Special Issue. Energy system restructuring for carbon neutrality has to include disruptive options (technologies and consumption paradigms), beyond conventional pathways studied so far in the literature. The electricity sector is of key importance to support electrification of final demand and produce carbon-neutral hydrogen, gas, and liquid hydrocarbons. Climate neutrality in power generation heavily depends on integration of renewables at a large scale. To this end, storage system, including with seasonal storage cycles, will need to develop. Distribution of carbon-neutral hydrogen, gas, and liquids has to restructure to accommodate blending from different origins and locations.

Consequently, the modeling of carbon-neutral energy systems has to include complexities, such as sectoral integration, interdependencies, behavioral and financial aspects, together with learning dynamics of technologies that are currently not yet mature in industry. Modeling of policy instruments that would enable restructuring towards carbon-neutrality needs to cover regulations, market coordination, infrastructure development, technology support, and removal of barriers in conjunction with market-based policies.

Prof. Pantelis Capros
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy system modeling
  • climate-neutral energy system
  • decarbonization transition
  • sectoral integration modeling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

39 pages, 5801 KiB  
Article
Decarbonization of Australia’s Energy System: Integrated Modeling of the Transformation of Electricity, Transportation, and Industrial Sectors
by Tino Aboumahboub, Robert J. Brecha, Himalaya Bir Shrestha, Ursula Fuentes, Andreas Geiges, William Hare, Michiel Schaeffer, Lara Welder and Matthew J. Gidden
Energies 2020, 13(15), 3805; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13153805 - 24 Jul 2020
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 5746
Abstract
To achieve the Paris Agreement’s long-term temperature goal, current energy systems must be transformed. Australia represents an interesting case for energy system transformation modeling: with a power system dominated by fossil fuels and, specifically, with a heavy coal component, there is at the [...] Read more.
To achieve the Paris Agreement’s long-term temperature goal, current energy systems must be transformed. Australia represents an interesting case for energy system transformation modeling: with a power system dominated by fossil fuels and, specifically, with a heavy coal component, there is at the same time a vast potential for expansion and use of renewables. We used the multi-sectoral Australian Energy Modeling System (AUSeMOSYS) to perform an integrated analysis of implications for the electricity, transport, and selected industry sectors to the mid-century. The state-level resolution allows representation of regional discrepancies in renewable supply and the quantification of inter-regional grid extensions necessary for the physical integration of variable renewables. We investigated the impacts of different CO2 budgets and selected key factors on energy system transformation. Results indicate that coal-fired generation has to be phased out completely by 2030 and a fully renewable electricity supply achieved in the 2030s according to the cost-optimal pathway implied by the 1.5 °C Paris Agreement-compatible carbon budget. Wind and solar PV can play a dominant role in decarbonizing Australia’s energy system with continuous growth of demand due to the strong electrification of linked energy sectors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modelling Climate-Neutral Energy Systems and Markets)
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21 pages, 4781 KiB  
Article
Highly Renewable District Heat for Espoo Utilizing Waste Heat Sources
by Pauli Hiltunen and Sanna Syri
Energies 2020, 13(14), 3551; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13143551 - 10 Jul 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3016
Abstract
The district heating operator Fortum and the city of Espoo have set a goal to abandon the use of coal in district heating production and increase the share of renewable sources to 95% by the year 2029. Among renewable fuels and heat pumps, [...] Read more.
The district heating operator Fortum and the city of Espoo have set a goal to abandon the use of coal in district heating production and increase the share of renewable sources to 95% by the year 2029. Among renewable fuels and heat pumps, waste heat utilization has an important role in Fortum’s plans for the decarbonization of district heating production, and Fortum is considering the possibility of utilizing waste heat from a large data center in its district heating network. The goal of this paper is to investigate the feasibility and required amount of waste heat to achieve this goal. Two different operation strategies are introduced—an operation strategy based on marginal costs and an operation strategy prioritizing waste heat utilization. Each strategy is modeled with three different electricity price scenarios. Because the low temperature waste heat from a data center must be primed by heat pumps, the electricity price has a significant impact on the feasibility of waste heat utilization. Prioritizing waste heat utilization leads to higher production costs, but a lower waste heat capacity is needed to reach the goal of 95% renewables in production. The higher electricity price emphasizes the differences between the two operation strategies. Waste heat utilization also leads to significant reductions of CO2 emissions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modelling Climate-Neutral Energy Systems and Markets)
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