Special Issue "Recent development in the field of biofuels from agricultural industry"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Talal Yusaf
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pro Vice-Chancellor, International and Partnerships Portfolio, Federation University Australia, Office A101c, Building A, Mt Helen Campus, PO Box 663, Ballarat, VIC 3353, Australia
Fax: +61 7 4631 2526
Interests: renewable energy; energy generation; conversion and storage; alternative fuels for internal combustion engine; microalgae fuel; mechanical method for water treatment
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Saddam Hussen Al-Lwayzy
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Researcher, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350, Australia
2. Academic, University of Mosul, Mosul, Iraq
Tel. +61 7 4631 1906
Interests: biofuels; microalgae; engine performance; engine emissions; agricultural machineries
Dr. Ihsan Hamawand
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Vice-Chancellor's Research Fellow, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350, Australia
Tel. +61 7 4631 2531
Interests: Bio-Energy from Agricultural Wastes, Anaerobic digestion, Lignocellulosic materials, Drying, Waste Recycling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I would like to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue of Energies with your recent publications, focusing on different aspects related to agricultural wastes, listed below.
Agricultural waste management has become more problematic in recent years with the increase in agricultural activities in response to human demand for agricultural products. Research has been showing great potential for converting agricultural wastes to useful energy sources. Bioenergy production from agricultural waste can be in many forms, such as biodiesel, bio-alcohol, charcoal, etc. To date, the commercialization of bioenergy production from agricultural waste has not reached the level hoped for due to different barriers and policies. Hence, it is important to address the latest developments in this area in order to provide the scientific community and industry stakeholders with updates that will serve their decision making.
The current Special Issue aims to explore how to advance the commercialization of the latest achievements in this field.

Topics of interest for publication include, but are not limited to:

  • Agricultural wastes (AW) management
  • Environmental impact of WA
  • Life cycle assessments of AW
  • Recent developments related to AW conversion to biofuels
  • Recent technologies of biofuels production
  • Using AW biofuels as energy sources for power production (engines, power plant, etc.)
  • The impact of AW biofuels on the current technology (tribological behavior, wear and tear of engine components)
  • Cost benefit analysis
  • Policies and regulations
  • Barriers and future

Prof. Talal Yusaf
Dr. Ihsan Hamawand
Dr. Saddam Hussen Al-Lwayzy
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Dependence of the Microporosity of Activated Carbons on the Lignocellulosic Composition of the Precursors
Energies 2017, 10(4), 542; https://doi.org/10.3390/en10040542 - 15 Apr 2017
Cited by 7
Abstract
A series of activated carbons were prepared by physical steam gasification under identical experimental conditions to compare the pore development from almond tree pruning chars and walnut shell activated carbons. The results obtained showed that steam gasification yields microporous carbons in both cases, [...] Read more.
A series of activated carbons were prepared by physical steam gasification under identical experimental conditions to compare the pore development from almond tree pruning chars and walnut shell activated carbons. The results obtained showed that steam gasification yields microporous carbons in both cases, and the rise in temperature causes an increase of the pore volumes of the activated carbons, up to a certain degree of burn-off. This effect was more marked for walnut shell, which gave rise to activated carbons with apparent surface values of up to 1434 m2 g−1. Also, a slight widening of porosity was found at low burn-off degrees. This pore widening was more marked in the case of activated carbons from almond tree pruning, which also have a high macropore volume. It was found that the lignocellulosic and porosity properties of the raw materials can cause this different behavior towards activation processes. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Influence of Micro-Oxygen Addition on Desulfurization Performance and Microbial Communities during Waste-Activated Sludge Digestion in a Rusty Scrap Iron-Loaded Anaerobic Digester
Energies 2017, 10(2), 258; https://doi.org/10.3390/en10020258 - 21 Feb 2017
Cited by 6
Abstract
In this study, micro-oxygen was integrated into a rusty scrap iron (RSI)-loaded anaerobic digester. Under an optimal RSI dosage of 20 g/L, increasing O2 levels were added stepwise in seven stages in a semi-continuous experiment. Results showed the average methane yield was [...] Read more.
In this study, micro-oxygen was integrated into a rusty scrap iron (RSI)-loaded anaerobic digester. Under an optimal RSI dosage of 20 g/L, increasing O2 levels were added stepwise in seven stages in a semi-continuous experiment. Results showed the average methane yield was 306 mL/g COD (chemical oxygen demand), and the hydrogen sulphide (H2S) concentration was 1933 ppmv with RSI addition. O2 addition induced the microbial oxidation of sulphide by stimulating sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and chemical corrosion of iron, which promoted the generation of FeS and Fe2S3. In the 6th phase of the semi-continuous test, deep desulfurization was achieved without negatively impacting system performance. Average methane yield was 301.1 mL/g COD, and H2S concentration was 75 ppmv. Sulfur mass balance was described, with 84.0%, 11.90% and 0.21% of sulfur present in solid, liquid and gaseous phases, respectively. The Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis revealed that RSI addition could enrich the diversity of hydrogenotrophic methanogens and iron-reducing bacteria to benefit methanogenesis and organic mineralization, and impoverish the methanotroph (Methylocella silvestris) to reduce the consumption of methane. Micro-oxygen supplementation could enhance the diversity of iron-oxidizing bacteria arising from the improvement of Fe(II) release rate and enrich the sulphur-oxidising bacteria to achieved desulfurization. These results demonstrated that RSI addition in combination with micro-oxygenation represents a promising method for simultaneously controlling biogas H2S concentration and improving digestion performance. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Investigation of Ethanol Production Potential from Lignocellulosic Material without Enzymatic Hydrolysis Using the Ultrasound Technique
Energies 2017, 10(1), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/en10010062 - 06 Jan 2017
Cited by 9
Abstract
This research investigates ethanol production from waste lignocellulosic material (sugarcane bagasse). The bagasse was first pretreated using chemicals and ultrasound techniques. These pretreatment techniques were applied separately and combined. The pretreated bagasse was then fermented anaerobically for biofuel production without enzymatic hydrolysis. The [...] Read more.
This research investigates ethanol production from waste lignocellulosic material (sugarcane bagasse). The bagasse was first pretreated using chemicals and ultrasound techniques. These pretreatment techniques were applied separately and combined. The pretreated bagasse was then fermented anaerobically for biofuel production without enzymatic hydrolysis. The results showed higher ethanol production than those reported in the literature. The maximum ethanol production of 820 mg/L was achieved with a combination of ultrasound (60 amplitude level, 127 W) and acid (3% H2SO4 concentration). The combination of two-step pretreatment such as an ultrasound (50 amplitude level, 109 W) with acid (3% H2SO4 concentration) and then an ultrasound with alkaline (23% NaOH concentration) generated 911 mg/L of ethanol. Full article
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