energies-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Transaction-Based Peer-to-Peer Energy Management Systems"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "A5: Smart Grids and Microgrids".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Malcolm D McCulloch
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Engineering Science, Energy and Power Group, Oxford University, Oxford, UK
Interests: Renewable energy technologies; Energy management; Energy storage; Electric vehicles; Simulation and modelling; High-temperature superconductivity
Dr. Thomas Morstyn
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
Interests: : Power systems; Control systems; Distributed control; Microgrids; Electricity markets

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Power systems are undergoing a fundamental transition due to the rapid adoption of distributed energy resources, including photovoltaic generation, electric vehicles, home batteries, and heat pumps. When combined with consumer-level communications and control, these resources allow previously passive consumers to become ‘prosumers’—consumers who can proactively manage their consumption, production, and storage of energy.

Recently, there has been significant interest in the potential for new transaction-based peer-to-peer energy management systems to integrate prosumer flexibility into power system operations. These systems offer advantages in terms of openness, transparency, and autonomy. At the same time, they introduce new challenges, particularly for managing uncertainty and network constraints, which have traditionally required aggregation and centralised coordination.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present state-of-the art research, solutions, and analysis in the field of transaction-based peer-to-peer energy management systems. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Communication architectures
  • Computational complexity and scalability
  • Coordination between energy trading platforms
  • Data privacy and security
  • Electricity market regulations
  • Energy access and distributional issues
  • Energy reliability
  • Game-theoretic analysis
  • Market mechanism design
  • Microgrid trading platforms
  • Modelling distributed energy resource flexibility
  • Modelling prosumer preferences and behaviours
  • Network costs and externalities
  • New business models
  • New energy and/or flexibility products
  • Pilot programs and field tests
  • Uncertainty and network constraints

Prof. Malcolm D McCulloch
Dr. Thomas Morstyn
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Blockchain
  • Energy trading
  • Flexibility
  • Game theory
  • Market design
  • Multi-sided platforms
  • Peer-to-peer
  • Prosumer
  • Smart grid
  • Transactive energy

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Effects of Local Electricity Trading on Power Flows and Voltage Levels for Different Elasticities and Prices
Energies 2019, 12(24), 4708; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12244708 - 10 Dec 2019
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 1104
Abstract
Local electricity trading is a concept that allows active electricity trading between consumers, producers and/or prosumers located in a local low voltage distribution grid. The concept should provide added value to the participants and accelerate the democratization, decarbonization and decentralization of the power [...] Read more.
Local electricity trading is a concept that allows active electricity trading between consumers, producers and/or prosumers located in a local low voltage distribution grid. The concept should provide added value to the participants and accelerate the democratization, decarbonization and decentralization of the power sector. The effects of local electricity trading on voltage levels in distribution grids are just in the early stage of research, together with the possible means of control, market design, market-clearing approaches and integration of the local electricity trading within the electricity markets. The aim of this work is to contribute to the research by examining if near real-time local electricity trading can be implemented in a distribution grid without time-consuming security-constrained unit commitment calculations for the observed time horizon and without security-constrained economic dispatch calculations for each trading period. Moreover, this work investigates if the implementation of local electricity trading can contribute to the avoidance of unpredictable and unfavorable consumption/production patterns, which can appear in the distribution grid due to the random behavior of a large number of participants. It is analyzed if a contribution to the maintenance of the voltages and currents within limits can be achieved that way. The method for simulation of a local electricity market and analysis of power flows and voltage levels is presented. The auction-based local electricity trading is simulated and applied on the modified IEEE European Low Voltage Test Feeder where the effects of local electricity trading on power flows and voltage levels are studied for boundary elasticities and prices of demand and supply offering curves. It is shown that the local electricity trading has potential to incentivize active participation of prosumers, which can lead to better demand/supply balancing at the local level and to a decrease of voltage fluctuations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transaction-Based Peer-to-Peer Energy Management Systems)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Consumer Demand for Blockchain-Enabled Peer-to-Peer Electricity Trading in the United Kingdom: An Online Survey Experiment
Energies 2019, 12(20), 3913; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12203913 - 16 Oct 2019
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 1518
Abstract
Peer-to-peer (P2P) energy trading could help address grid management challenges in a decentralizing electricity system, as well as provide other social and environmental benefits. Many existing and proposed trading schemes are enabled by blockchain, a distributed ledger technology (DLT) relying on cryptographic proof [...] Read more.
Peer-to-peer (P2P) energy trading could help address grid management challenges in a decentralizing electricity system, as well as provide other social and environmental benefits. Many existing and proposed trading schemes are enabled by blockchain, a distributed ledger technology (DLT) relying on cryptographic proof of ownership rather than human intermediaries to establish energy transactions. This study used an online survey experiment (n = 2064) to investigate how consumer demand for blockchain-enabled peer-to-peer energy trading schemes in the United Kingdom varies depending on how the consumer proposition is designed and communicated. The analysis provides some evidence of a preference for schemes offering to meet a higher proportion of participants’ energy needs and for those operating at the city/region (as compared to national or neighbourhood) level. People were more likely to say they would participate when the scheme was framed as being run by their local council, followed by an energy supplier, community energy organization, and social media company. Anonymity was the most valued DLT characteristic and mentioning blockchain’s association with Bitcoin led to a substantial decrease in intended uptake. We highlight a range of important questions and implications suggested by these findings for the introduction and operation of P2P trading schemes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transaction-Based Peer-to-Peer Energy Management Systems)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop