Special Issue "Design of Materials for Solid State Hydrogen Storage"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Energy Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Adam Revesz
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Physics, Eötvös University, P.O.B. 32, H-1518, Budapest, Hungary
Interests: hydrogen storage; nanocrystals; magnesium-based alloys; severe plastic deformation; ball-milling; X-ray diffraction; amourphous alloys; bulk metallic glasses

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Although the utilization of renewable energy sources has been developing rapidly in recent years, their fraction of the overall energy economy is still small. Hydrogen, as the lightest element of all, appears to be a suitable energy storage media because of its exceptional chemical energy per unit mass (142 MJkg-1) and environmental friendliness. The stored energy of hydrogen can easily be transformed to electricity in a fuel cell with a by-product of water, resulting in a 100% clean emission. Hydrogen economy appears to be one of the main hopes for solving both renewable energy needs and environmental problems. However, the efficient storage of hydrogen is still a technological challenge in the way of its wide-range applications.

Among the different solid-state hydrogen storage systems, complex and conventional metal hydrides have drawn significant attention because of their remarkable gravimetric and volumetric capacities. The kinetics and thermodynamic destabilization of these materials can be improved either by nanocrystallization and/or by different additives. Nanocrystallization based on severe plastic deformation can be processed via high energy ball milling (HEBM), equal channel angular pressing (ECAP), and cold rolling (CR). Adding catalysts, like transition metals, their oxides, and carbon-based materials, have a substantial impact on the effectiveness of hydrogen storage.

This Special Issue would like to encourage the submission of original contributions regarding recent developments on materials synthesis for efficient hydrogen storage by processing techniques based on severe plastic deformation.

Prof. Dr. Adam Revesz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hydrogen storage
  • metal hydrides
  • complex hydrides
  • catalysts
  • carbon-based additives
  • sever plastic deformation
  • ball-milling
  • equal channel angular pressing
  • cold rolling

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Microstructural Investigation of Nanocrystalline Hydrogen-Storing Mg-Titanate Nanotube Composites Processed by High-Pressure Torsion
Energies 2020, 13(3), 563; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13030563 - 23 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
A high-energy ball milling and subsequent high-pressure torsion method was applied to synthesize nanocrystalline magnesium samples catalyzed by TiO2 or titanate nanotubes. The microstructure of the as-milled powders and the torqued bulk disks was characterized by X-ray diffraction. The recorded diffractograms have [...] Read more.
A high-energy ball milling and subsequent high-pressure torsion method was applied to synthesize nanocrystalline magnesium samples catalyzed by TiO2 or titanate nanotubes. The microstructure of the as-milled powders and the torqued bulk disks was characterized by X-ray diffraction. The recorded diffractograms have been evaluated by the convolutional multiple whole profile fitting algorithm, which provided microstructural parameters (average crystal size, crystallite size distribution, average dislocation density). The morphology of the nanotube-containing disks has been examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The effect of the different additives and preparation conditions on the hydrogen absorption behavior was investigated in a Sieverts’-type apparatus. It was found that the ball-milling route has a prominent effect on the dispersion and morphology of the titanate nanotubes, and the absorption capability of the Mg-based composite is highly dependent on these features. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design of Materials for Solid State Hydrogen Storage)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Direct Synthesis of NaBH4 Nanoparticles from NaOCH3 for Hydrogen Storage
Energies 2019, 12(23), 4428; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12234428 - 21 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Hydrogen is regarded as a promising energy carrier to substitute fossil fuels. However, storing hydrogen with high density remains a challenge. NaBH4 is a potential hydrogen storage material due to its high gravimetric hydrogen density (10.8 mass%), but the hydrogen kinetic and [...] Read more.
Hydrogen is regarded as a promising energy carrier to substitute fossil fuels. However, storing hydrogen with high density remains a challenge. NaBH4 is a potential hydrogen storage material due to its high gravimetric hydrogen density (10.8 mass%), but the hydrogen kinetic and thermodynamic properties of NaBH4 are poor against the application needs. Nanosizing is an effective strategy to improve the hydrogen properties of NaBH4. In this context, we report on the direct synthesis of NaBH4 nanoparticles (~6–260 nm) from the NaOCH3 precursor. The hydrogen desorption properties of such nanoparticles are reported as well as experimental conditions that lead to the synthesis of (Na2B12H12) free NaBH4 nanoparticles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design of Materials for Solid State Hydrogen Storage)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Design of Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage
Energies 2020, 13(13), 3503; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13133503 - 07 Jul 2020
Abstract
The interaction of hydrogen with solids and the mechanisms of hydride formation experience significant changes in nanomaterials due to a number of structural features. This review aims at illustrating the design principles that have recently inspired the development of new nanomaterials for hydrogen [...] Read more.
The interaction of hydrogen with solids and the mechanisms of hydride formation experience significant changes in nanomaterials due to a number of structural features. This review aims at illustrating the design principles that have recently inspired the development of new nanomaterials for hydrogen storage. After a general discussion about the influence of nanomaterials’ microstructure on their hydrogen sorption properties, several scientific cases and hot topics are illustrated surveying various classes of materials. These include bulk-like nanomaterials processed by mechanochemical routes, thin films and multilayers, nano-objects with composite architectures such as core–shell or composite nanoparticles, and nanoparticles on porous or graphene-like supports. Finally, selected examples of recent in situ studies of metal–hydride transformation mechanisms using microscopy and spectroscopy techniques are highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design of Materials for Solid State Hydrogen Storage)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop