energies-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Next-Generation High-Temperature Solar Thermal Receivers for Concentrating Solar Power Systems"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "A: Sustainable Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 December 2021) | Viewed by 1617

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Clifford K. Ho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque 5800, NM, USA
Interests: high-temperature solar thermal receiver modeling and testing; solid particle receivers; optical analysis and characterization of collectors and selective absorbers; glare and avian hazard analyses; CFD modeling for coupled optical/fluid/thermal analyses; system and technoeconomic analyses
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

This Special Issue focuses on next-generation high-temperature solar thermal receivers that can achieve temperatures above 700 °C for concentrating solar power applications. Higher temperatures are being pursued to provide heat to advanced power cycles (e.g., supercritical CO2 and hybrid Brayton cycles) that can increase overall efficiency and reduce system costs. High-temperature receivers can employ different heat-transfer media, including liquids, gases, and solids. Research on high-temperature liquid-based receivers includes molten chloride salts and sodium receivers. Volumetric air receivers have been previously investigated, and more recent research on high-temperature gas receivers has pursued supercritical CO2 as the heat-transfer medium. Solid particle receivers are an active area of research, including centrifugal, fluidized, free-fall, and obstructed particle-flow design concepts. Active research includes materials testing and selection, design optimization, computational modeling, and both bench-scale and large-scale (on-sun) testing. This Special Issue presents papers describing research in each of these areas. Ongoing challenges and research needs are presented along with recent findings and accomplishments associated with these next-generation high-temperature solar thermal receivers.

Dr. Clifford K. Ho
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • CSP
  • solar receivers
  • Gen3
  • high temperature
  • supercritical CO2
  • particle receiver
  • liquid receiver
  • gas receiver

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Jump to: Other

Review
Design Evaluation of a Next-Generation High-Temperature Particle Receiver for Concentrating Solar Thermal Applications
Energies 2022, 15(5), 1657; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15051657 - 23 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 652
Abstract
High-temperature particle receivers are being developed to achieve temperatures in excess of 700 °C for advanced power cycles and solar thermochemical processes. This paper describes designs and features of a falling particle receiver system that has been evaluated and tested at the National [...] Read more.
High-temperature particle receivers are being developed to achieve temperatures in excess of 700 °C for advanced power cycles and solar thermochemical processes. This paper describes designs and features of a falling particle receiver system that has been evaluated and tested at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. These advanced designs are intended to reduce heat losses and increase the thermal efficiency. Novel features include aperture covers, active air flow, particle flow obstructions, and optimized receiver shapes that minimize advective heat losses, increase particle curtain opacity and uniformity, and reduce cavity wall temperatures. Control systems are implemented in recent on-sun tests to maintain a desired particle outlet temperature using an automated closed-loop proportional–integral–derivative controller. These tests demonstrate the ability to achieve and maintain particle outlet temperatures approaching 800 °C with efficiencies between 60 and 90%, depending on incident power, mass flow, and environmental conditions. Lessons learned regarding the testing of design features and overall receiver operation are also presented. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Review

Perspective
De-Risking Solar Receivers to Achieve SunShot Targets
Energies 2022, 15(7), 2508; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15072508 - 29 Mar 2022
Viewed by 598
Abstract
Concentrating solar thermal (CST) systems are unique among renewable energy options for the ease of integration with thermal energy storage (TES). This enables dispatchable (or continuous) production of electricity, process heat, solar fuels, or other chemical products. The solar receiver in a CST [...] Read more.
Concentrating solar thermal (CST) systems are unique among renewable energy options for the ease of integration with thermal energy storage (TES). This enables dispatchable (or continuous) production of electricity, process heat, solar fuels, or other chemical products. The solar receiver in a CST system converts concentrated sunlight to transportable thermal energy. In solar power towers, the solar receiver’s physical limitations are often the constraining conditions for the system; they restrict maximum temperature, maximum solar concentration, or controllable chemical production. It is also a uniquely challenging component to prototype and test at sizes beyond the laboratory scale. Transitioning exceptional research innovations into viable components for an integrated system and ultimately leading to CST market adoption requires a multiscale vision for component de-risking and development. Technical requirements for holistic novel receiver development are reviewed based on learnings from the US Department of Energy’s (USDOE) SunShot Initiative, its active Third Generation of Concentrating Solar Power Systems (Gen3 CSP) program, and anticipation of requirements for future high value applications for CST. Context and learnings from the Gen3 CSP program are provided to exemplify successful receiver risk-reduction paradigms. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop