Special Issue "Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Energy Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 January 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Andrew Dicks
Website
Guest Editor
Griffith University, Queensland, Australia
Interests: hydrogen; fuel cells; renewable energy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are an exciting clean energy technology for power delivery for a range of devices from automotive applications to portable digital equipment, and as a component in renewable energy delivery systems. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are a sustainable means of power generation through the electrochemical conversion of hydrogen, especially in portable, stationary, and automotive applications. The traditional PEMFC utilizes a solid polymer electrolyte membrane based on a hydrated perfluorinated sulfonic acid (Teflon-based) between two porous electrodes comprising thin layers of catalyst coated on porous gas-diffusion layers. The membrane is both an excellent proton conductor of protons and an electronic insulator.

This Special Issue focuses on all PEMFC scientific and technological aspects that decrease cost and increase performance and durability. It covers new membrane development for high temperature operation, as well as the most recent progresses in advanced electrocatalysts, from the synthesis and characterization to the evaluation of corrosion resistance and catalytic activity, including novel characterization methods, mathematical models, and accelerated stress tests to gain additional insight into degradation mechanisms. Innovations in other cell components, including gas diffusion layers, cells, stacks, and system designs, will also be included.

Dr. Andrew Dicks
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Proton exchange membrane fuel cell
  • Nanoparticle technologies
  • Anode
  • Cathode
  • Platinum
  • Proton conductivity
  • Surface area
  • Nanoparticles
  • Polymer membranes
  • Durability
  • Electrocatalysts

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperCommunication
Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Fuel Cell Nanocatalyst Plasma Sputtering Growth and Deposition
Energies 2020, 13(14), 3584; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13143584 - 11 Jul 2020
Abstract
Molecular dynamics simulations (MDs) are carried out for predicting platinum Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell nanocatalyst growth on a model carbon electrode. The aim is to provide a one-shot simulation of the entire multistep process of deposition in the context of plasma [...] Read more.
Molecular dynamics simulations (MDs) are carried out for predicting platinum Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell nanocatalyst growth on a model carbon electrode. The aim is to provide a one-shot simulation of the entire multistep process of deposition in the context of plasma sputtering, from sputtering of the target catalyst/transport to the electrode substrate/deposition on the porous electrode. The plasma processing reactor is reduced to nanoscale dimensions for tractable MDs using scale reduction of the plasma phase and requesting identical collision numbers in experiments and the simulation box. The present simulations reproduce the role of plasma pressure for the plasma phase growth of nanocatalysts (here, platinum). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells)
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Open AccessArticle
Energy Management Strategy of a PEM Fuel Cell Excavator with a Supercapacitor/Battery Hybrid Power Source
Energies 2019, 12(22), 4362; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12224362 - 15 Nov 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Construction machines are heavy-duty equipment and a major contributor to the environmental pollution. By using only electric motors instead of an internal combustion engine, the problems of low engine efficiency and air pollution can be solved. This paper proposed a novel energy management [...] Read more.
Construction machines are heavy-duty equipment and a major contributor to the environmental pollution. By using only electric motors instead of an internal combustion engine, the problems of low engine efficiency and air pollution can be solved. This paper proposed a novel energy management strategy for a PEM fuel cell excavator with a supercapacitor/battery hybrid power source. The fuel cell is the main power supply for most of the excavator workload while the battery/supercapacitor is the energy storage device, which supplies additional required power and recovers energy. The whole system model was built in a co-simulation environment, which is a combination of MATLAB/Simulink and AMESim software, where the fuel cell, battery, supercapacitor model, and the energy management algorithm were developed in a Simulink environment while the excavator model was designed in an AMESim environment. In this work, the energy management strategy was designed to concurrently account for power supply performance from the hybrid power sources as well as from fuel cells, and battery lifespan. The control design was proposed to distribute the power demand optimally from the excavator to the hybrid power sources in different working conditions. The simulation results were presented to demonstrate the good performance of the system. The effectiveness of the proposed energy management strategy was validated. Compared with the conventional strategies where the task requirements cannot be achieved or system stability cannot be accomplished, the proposed algorithms perfectly satisfied the working conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Bridging the Gap between Automated Manufacturing of Fuel Cell Components and Robotic Assembly of Fuel Cell Stacks
Energies 2019, 12(19), 3604; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12193604 - 20 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Recently demonstrated robotic assembling technologies for fuel cell stacks used fuel cell components manually pre-arranged in stacks (presenters). Identifying the original orientation of fuel cell components and loading them in presenters for a subsequent automated assembly process is a difficult, repetitive work cycle [...] Read more.
Recently demonstrated robotic assembling technologies for fuel cell stacks used fuel cell components manually pre-arranged in stacks (presenters). Identifying the original orientation of fuel cell components and loading them in presenters for a subsequent automated assembly process is a difficult, repetitive work cycle which if done manually, deceives the advantages offered by either the automated fabrication technologies for fuel cell components or by the robotic assembly processes. We present for the first time a robotic technology which enables the integration of automated fabrication processes for fuel cell components with a robotic assembly process of fuel cell stacks into a fully automated fuel cell manufacturing line. This task uses a Yaskawa Motoman SDA5F dual arm robot with integrated machine vision system. The process is used to identify and grasp randomly placed, slightly asymmetric fuel cell components, to reorient them all in the same position and stack them in presenters in preparation for a subsequent robotic assembly process. The process was demonstrated as part of a larger endeavor of bringing to readiness advanced manufacturing technologies for alternative energy systems, and responds the high priority needs identified by the U.S. Department of Energy for fuel cells manufacturing research and development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells)
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