Special Issue "Recent Advances in Organic Bioelectronics and Sensors"

A special issue of Electronics (ISSN 2079-9292). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioelectronics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 July 2015).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ruth Shinar

Microelectronics Research Center and Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: organic sensors and bioelectronics, organic electronics: OLEDs, solar cells, and integrated sensor systems
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Emil J.W. List-Kratochvil

AG Hybride Bauelemente, Institut für Physik & Institut für Chemie, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Brook-Taylor-Straße 6, 12489 Berlin, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sensor devices, inkjet printed electronic devices, memory devices, organic and hybrid solar cells, and OLEDs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent progress in the various branches of organic electronics has prompted increasing interest in their utilization for addressing the need for lightweight, inexpensive, and field-deployable versatile bioelectronic devices, such as sensors and photo-detectors. Therefore, the field of organic bioelectronics and sensors is drawing increasing interest within the organic electronics community. In particular, the exploration of chemical, ionic, electronic, and opto-electronic attributes of organic and bio-inspired materials, and their incorporation in biomedical and sensing applications, has drawn special attention. This Special Issue will, therefore, address recent advances in this rapidly growing field. Topics include organic materials in tissue engineering, cell growth, and drug delivery; luminescent conjugated polymers in disease detection; bio-inspired systems and biomaterials in biotechnology and medical applications; organic electroactive materials in actuators; OLED-, OFET-, and hybrid organic/inorganic transistors-based (bio)chemical sensors; organic semiconductor lasers for analytical applications; organic semiconductors in image, strain, pressure, and temperature sensors; tunable multicolor OLED arrays in on-chip spectrophotometers; organic photo-detectors; and flexible/stretchable electronics for large-area sensors and actuators. Case studies, reviews, and research papers on these and related topics are invited.

Prof. Dr. Ruth Shinar
Prof. Dr. Emil J.W. List-Kratochvil
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Electronics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • Organic bioelectronics: tissue engineering, drug delivery, medical implants and sensors
  • Cell growth on organic semiconductors; organic/biological interfaces
  • Bio-inspired systems and materials in biotechnology and medical applications
  • Conducting and luminescent conjugated polymers in biosensors and disease detection
  • Integrated OLED-based sensors and sensor systems
  • OTFTs, organic electrochemical transistors, and hybrid organic/inorganic transistors in (bio)chemical sensing
  • Organic and hybrid organic/inorganic semiconductors in strain, pressure, and temperature sensors
  • Organic semiconductor lasers for analytical applications
  • Flexible/stretchable/conformable electronics for large-area sensors and actuators
  • Array technologies in organic electronics: microfluidics, nanoscale, and lab-on-a-chip
  • Organic photo-detectors and image sensors
  • Integrated sensor labels for fast screening
  • Capacitive and resistive sensors

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Organic Optical Sensor Based on Monolithic Integration of Organic Electronic Devices
Electronics 2015, 4(3), 623-632; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics4030623
Received: 17 July 2015 / Revised: 5 September 2015 / Accepted: 10 September 2015 / Published: 17 September 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (849 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A novel organic optical sensor that integrates a front organic light-emitting diode (OLED) and an organic photodiode (OPD) is demonstrated. The stripe-shaped cathode is used in the OLED components to create light signals, while the space between the stripe-shaped cathodes serves as the [...] Read more.
A novel organic optical sensor that integrates a front organic light-emitting diode (OLED) and an organic photodiode (OPD) is demonstrated. The stripe-shaped cathode is used in the OLED components to create light signals, while the space between the stripe-shaped cathodes serves as the detection window for integrated OPD units. A MoO3 (5 nm)/Ag (15 nm) bi-layer inter-electrode is interposed between the vertically stacked OLED and OPD units, serving simultaneously as the cathode for the front OLED and an anode for the upper OPD units in the sensor. In the integrated sensor, the emission of the OLED units is confined by the area of the opaque stripe-shaped cathodes, optimized to maximize the reflected light passing through the window space for detection by the OPD components. This can ensure high OLED emission output, increasing the signal/noise ratio. The design and fabrication flexibility of an integrated OLED/OPD device also has low cost benefits, and is light weight and ultra-thin, making it possible for application in wearable units, finger print identification, image sensors, smart light sources, and compact information systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Organic Bioelectronics and Sensors)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Electrolytic Gated Organic Field-Effect Transistors for Application in Biosensors—A Review
Received: 10 December 2015 / Revised: 3 February 2016 / Accepted: 16 February 2016 / Published: 25 February 2016
Cited by 34 | PDF Full-text (8968 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistors have emerged in the field of biosensors over the last five years, due to their attractive simplicity and high sensitivity to interfacial changes, both on the gate/electrolyte and semiconductor/electrolyte interfaces, where a target-specific bioreceptor can be immobilized. This article [...] Read more.
Electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistors have emerged in the field of biosensors over the last five years, due to their attractive simplicity and high sensitivity to interfacial changes, both on the gate/electrolyte and semiconductor/electrolyte interfaces, where a target-specific bioreceptor can be immobilized. This article reviews the recent literature concerning biosensing with such transistors, gives clues to understanding the basic principles under which electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistors work, and details the transduction mechanisms that were investigated to convert a receptor/target association into a change in drain current. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Organic Bioelectronics and Sensors)
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Open AccessReview
Organic Bioelectronic Tools for Biomedical Applications
Electronics 2015, 4(4), 879-908; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics4040879
Received: 22 September 2015 / Revised: 23 October 2015 / Accepted: 26 October 2015 / Published: 5 November 2015
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (1472 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Organic bioelectronics forms the basis of conductive polymer tools with great potential for application in biomedical science and medicine. It is a rapidly growing field of both academic and industrial interest since conductive polymers bridge the gap between electronics and biology by being [...] Read more.
Organic bioelectronics forms the basis of conductive polymer tools with great potential for application in biomedical science and medicine. It is a rapidly growing field of both academic and industrial interest since conductive polymers bridge the gap between electronics and biology by being electronically and ionically conductive. This feature can be employed in numerous ways by choosing the right polyelectrolyte system and tuning its properties towards the intended application. This review highlights how active organic bioelectronic surfaces can be used to control cell attachment and release as well as to trigger cell signaling by means of electrical, chemical or mechanical actuation. Furthermore, we report on the unique properties of conductive polymers that make them outstanding materials for labeled or label-free biosensors. Techniques for electronically controlled ion transport in organic bioelectronic devices are introduced, and examples are provided to illustrate their use in self-regulated medical devices. Organic bioelectronics have great potential to become a primary platform in future bioelectronics. We therefore introduce current applications that will aid in the development of advanced in vitro systems for biomedical science and of automated systems for applications in neuroscience, cell biology and infection biology. Considering this broad spectrum of applications, organic bioelectronics could lead to timely detection of disease, and facilitate the use of remote and personalized medicine. As such, organic bioelectronics might contribute to efficient healthcare and reduced hospitalization times for patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Organic Bioelectronics and Sensors)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Organic Photodetectors in Analytical Applications
Electronics 2015, 4(3), 688-722; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics4030688
Received: 23 July 2015 / Accepted: 16 September 2015 / Published: 23 September 2015
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (1543 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This review focuses on the utilization of organic photodetectors (OPDs) in optical analytical applications, highlighting examples of chemical and biological sensors and lab-on-a-chip spectrometers. The integration of OPDs with other organic optical sensor components, such as organic light emitting diode (OLED) excitation sources [...] Read more.
This review focuses on the utilization of organic photodetectors (OPDs) in optical analytical applications, highlighting examples of chemical and biological sensors and lab-on-a-chip spectrometers. The integration of OPDs with other organic optical sensor components, such as organic light emitting diode (OLED) excitation sources and thin organic sensing films, presents a step toward achieving compact, eventually disposable all-organic analytical devices. We discuss recent advances in developing and integrating OPDs for various applications as well as challenges faced in this area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Organic Bioelectronics and Sensors)
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