Special Issue "Universal Design for Inclusive Pedagogy"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. David Arendale

Department of Curriculum and Instruction, College of Education & Human Development, University of Minnesota, Peik Hall 275D, 159 Pillsbury Drive, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: universal design for learning; postsecondary access; learning assistance; peer learning programs; learning technologies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue seeks to address the needs of all postsecondary/tertiary students for a barrier-free learning environment to increase their academic achievement, engagement, learning mastery, and persistence to graduation. Universal Design for Inclusive Pedagogy (UDIP) is sensitive to diverse students and individual differences to promote access and equity. While our colleagues in elementary and secondary education have been addressing this issue for many years, postsecondary education is a newer field for this approach. The six articles in this issue break new ground with expanding the boundaries of Universal Design (UD). Areas explored in this special issue are transformed curriculum, innovative teaching and learning practices, cross national and cross cultural student interactions, application of UD to academic pathways, and UDIP embedded into the institutional culture and policies. The central themes of the articles are increased access, equity, and social justice for all students.

Dr. David Arendale
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • universal design for inclusive pedagogy
  • widening access
  • inclusive pedagogy
  • postsecondary/tertiary education
  • universal instructional design
  • barrier-free learning environment

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Introduction to Special Issue on Universal Design for Inclusive Pedagogy and a Future Research Agenda
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 203; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8040203
Received: 14 November 2018 / Accepted: 15 November 2018 / Published: 18 November 2018
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Abstract
This Special Issue seeks to address the needs of all postsecondary/tertiary students for a barrier-free learning environment to increase their academic achievement, engagement, learning mastery, and persistence to graduation. Universal Design for Inclusive Pedagogy (UDIP) is sensitive to diverse students and individual differences [...] Read more.
This Special Issue seeks to address the needs of all postsecondary/tertiary students for a barrier-free learning environment to increase their academic achievement, engagement, learning mastery, and persistence to graduation. Universal Design for Inclusive Pedagogy (UDIP) is sensitive to diverse students and individual differences to promote access and equity. While our colleagues in elementary and secondary education have been addressing this issue for many years, postsecondary education is a newer field for this approach. The six articles in this issue break new ground with regards to expanding the boundaries of Universal Design (UD). Areas explored in this Special Issue are transformed curriculum, innovative teaching and learning practices, cross-national and cross-cultural student interactions, application of UD to academic pathways, and UDIP embedded into the institutional culture and policies. The central themes of the articles are increased access, equity, and social justice for all students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Universal Design for Inclusive Pedagogy)

Research

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Open AccessCommunication
Bridging Countries and Cultures through Accessible Global Collaborations
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 199; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8040199
Received: 17 September 2018 / Revised: 24 October 2018 / Accepted: 5 November 2018 / Published: 14 November 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (192 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper discusses and provides two case studies on a postsecondary, accessible, global project among students in Russia, China, and the United States. The project design was to engage diverse students in an international conversation to explore their place in the world and [...] Read more.
This paper discusses and provides two case studies on a postsecondary, accessible, global project among students in Russia, China, and the United States. The project design was to engage diverse students in an international conversation to explore their place in the world and envision their future as individuals, innovators, workers, and/or leaders in this globalized world. The three countries chosen, Russia, China, and the United States, are world powers and are pivotal countries for building international bridges. This paper highlights the evolution of the project and students’ vision for developing ongoing student-centered international research projects. It is the hope of the authors that educators reading this article will be inspired to embark on other accessible global projects designed to enhance language and cultural competence with and among all college students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Universal Design for Inclusive Pedagogy)
Open AccessArticle
Intercultural Pedagogy: A Faculty Learning Cohort
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 177; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8040177
Received: 1 September 2018 / Revised: 6 October 2018 / Accepted: 7 October 2018 / Published: 20 October 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (212 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to describe and reflect on a pilot faculty learning cohort that was designed to improve the frequency and the quality of cross-national and cross-cultural student interactions in the participants’ undergraduate courses. The cohort offered a space where [...] Read more.
The purpose of this article is to describe and reflect on a pilot faculty learning cohort that was designed to improve the frequency and the quality of cross-national and cross-cultural student interactions in the participants’ undergraduate courses. The cohort offered a space where faculty could gain insight on the experience of international students (IS) and non-native English speakers (NNES), develop knowledge about best practices and relevant research, and explore and test tools to promote inclusion and interactions. The cohort focused on cross-national interactions because strong and consistent data indicate that international and domestic students seek more purposeful and substantive interactions, both in and out of the classroom, but lack the confidence and structure to engage in them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Universal Design for Inclusive Pedagogy)
Open AccessArticle
Extending Universal Design for Learning through Concurrent Enrollment: Algebra Teachers’ Perspectives
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 154; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8040154
Received: 30 August 2018 / Revised: 18 September 2018 / Accepted: 19 September 2018 / Published: 21 September 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (438 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Concurrent enrollment refers to partnerships between postsecondary institutions and schools through which secondary school students can complete a university class taught by a qualifying secondary school teacher at their secondary school. We propose that concurrent enrollment programs are an under-recognized tool for extending [...] Read more.
Concurrent enrollment refers to partnerships between postsecondary institutions and schools through which secondary school students can complete a university class taught by a qualifying secondary school teacher at their secondary school. We propose that concurrent enrollment programs are an under-recognized tool for extending the impact of Universal Design for Learning (UDL). The context of our study is an equity-focused university course in algebraic mathematical modeling that is also offered through concurrent enrollment in over 30 secondary schools to over 800 secondary students annually in our state of Minnesota, U.S.A. This paper presents a qualitative analysis of secondary school teachers’ experiences implementing the inquiry pedagogy and the equity goals of the course. Several results are important for UDL. Teachers (1) describe equity in social terms of race, ethnicity, income, immigration, and language status in addition to measures of academic success; (2) perceive improvements in students’ attitudes towards mathematics, school, and university education; (3) perceive student academic growth through mathematical writing; and (4) report close relationships with students. If higher education faculty design their on-campus classes to incorporate UDL principles, concurrent enrollment offers the potential to improve inclusive pathways from secondary schools to universities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Universal Design for Inclusive Pedagogy)
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Open AccessArticle
Expanding the Scope of Universal Design: Implications for Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(3), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8030147
Received: 4 September 2018 / Revised: 10 September 2018 / Accepted: 10 September 2018 / Published: 12 September 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (243 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article encourages postsecondary educators to expand the scope of applications of universal design and universal instructional design by exploring how principles of UD and UID can be applied to other social identities, and specifically to gender identity and sexual orientation. There are [...] Read more.
This article encourages postsecondary educators to expand the scope of applications of universal design and universal instructional design by exploring how principles of UD and UID can be applied to other social identities, and specifically to gender identity and sexual orientation. There are many parallels that can be drawn between students who are excluded because of their disability and students who are marginalized on the basis of nonconforming gender identity or sexual orientation. It is important that faculty and staff understand intersectionality and interdependence among social identities and consider what steps they can take to apply UID principles in ways that consider multiple aspects of identity in order to provide inclusive educational experiences for all students. Scenarios for further discussion are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Universal Design for Inclusive Pedagogy)

Other

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Open AccessConcept Paper
Ignatian Pedagogy as a Frame for Universal Design in College: Meeting Learning Needs of Generation Z
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 193; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8040193
Received: 31 August 2018 / Revised: 26 October 2018 / Accepted: 1 November 2018 / Published: 5 November 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (216 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In viewing the principles of Universal Instructional Design (UID), both inside and outside the classroom, a direct connection may be made to the principles of Ignatian pedagogy—a 500-year old tradition of education—in meeting the learning needs of today’s college students, Generation Z. The [...] Read more.
In viewing the principles of Universal Instructional Design (UID), both inside and outside the classroom, a direct connection may be made to the principles of Ignatian pedagogy—a 500-year old tradition of education—in meeting the learning needs of today’s college students, Generation Z. The Ignatian pedagogy as a frame for universal instructiosnal design principles can guide instructors to understand how college students can learn best and facilitate that knowledge acquisition to serve the common good. This article addresses Generation Z’s experience with digital technology and illustrates how the Ignatian pedagogical model tenets (i.e., context, experience, reflection, action, and evaluation) connect with UID practices in a higher education curriculum. Examples of UID, as it applies to each tenet and to web access, are included. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Universal Design for Inclusive Pedagogy)
Open AccessConcept Paper
Integrating Universal Design, Culturally Sustaining Practices, and Constructivism to Advance Inclusive Pedagogy in the Undergraduate Classroom
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 167; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8040167
Received: 3 August 2018 / Revised: 11 September 2018 / Accepted: 7 October 2018 / Published: 10 October 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (209 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While primary and secondary teachers are legally required to adhere to inclusion guidelines for students experiencing disabilities, instructors in higher education have had more leeway to operate under a more traditional paradigm which can marginalize rather than include students in the classroom. Furthermore, [...] Read more.
While primary and secondary teachers are legally required to adhere to inclusion guidelines for students experiencing disabilities, instructors in higher education have had more leeway to operate under a more traditional paradigm which can marginalize rather than include students in the classroom. Furthermore, students experience exclusion for reasons other than and in addition to disabilities, including, race, ethnicity, language, gender, and sexual orientation. Inorderto advance inclusion for all students in the higher education classroom, we propose integrating universal design, culturally sustaining pedagogy, and constructivist approaches to teaching and learning. We aim to not only forward an integrative theoretical framework for inclusive pedagogy grounded in a constructivist perspective, but to also provide practical strategies that promote a more inclusive undergraduate classroom. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Universal Design for Inclusive Pedagogy)
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