Special Issue "Biodiversity of Marine Microbes"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Diversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Savvas Genitsaris
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
International Hellenic University, Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: microbial ecology; molecular diversity of microbes; metagenomics; bioinformatics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Marine microbial life is comprised of a variety of different evolutionary groups from all three domains of life, Eukaryotes, Bacteria, and Archaea. It is responsible for about half of the primary production on earth, plays irreplaceable roles in biogeochemical cycles and ecosystem functioning, and actively participates in complex processes and interactions. Marine microbes are the basis of marine trophic webs (autotrophs), and also an important link between different trophic levels (decomposers, parasites, and endosymbionts). They are used as biological indicators of water quality, eutrophication, and degraded marine environments, and are targeted in conservation and restoration plans. Our understanding of their responses to climate change is considered a key research field to comprehend the complex ongoing processes that will shape the planet’s future. They consist of a vast diversity of organisms, with diverse morphological features, sizes, physiology, functions, trophic characteristics, distribution, ecology, evolutionary traits, genetic content, and responses to abiotic variability. Even though we understand their significance in numerous aspects that affect all life on earth, we still have a long way to go in order to answer fundamental questions driving recent research: How many marine microbes are there? Where can we find them? What do they do? What is their role and responses in the light of climate change? What are their phylogenetic relationships? How do they respond to environmental pressures? And many more. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing accompanied with the technological innovations of classical tools, such as microscopy, have given researchers the equipment and the incentive to attempt to tackle the above questions and shed light on the complex and diverse life of marine microbes. This Special Issue provides a platform to highlight new research and significant advances related to the biodiversity of marine microbes.

Dr. Savvas Genitsaris
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Algae
  • Protists
  • Prokaryotes
  • Taxonomic diversity
  • Functional diversity
  • Genetic diversity
  • Climate change
  • Indicators ecology
  • High-throughput sequencing
  • Microscopy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Changes in Heterotrophic Picoplankton Community Structure after Induction of a Phytoplankton Bloom under Different Light Regimes
Diversity 2019, 11(10), 195; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11100195 - 15 Oct 2019
Abstract
Bacterial and archaeal diversity and succession were studied during a mesocosm experiment that investigated whether changing light regimes could affect the onset of phytoplankton blooms. For this, 454-pyrosequencing of the bacterial V1-V3 and archaeal V3-V9 16S rRNA regions was performed in samples collected [...] Read more.
Bacterial and archaeal diversity and succession were studied during a mesocosm experiment that investigated whether changing light regimes could affect the onset of phytoplankton blooms. For this, 454-pyrosequencing of the bacterial V1-V3 and archaeal V3-V9 16S rRNA regions was performed in samples collected from four mesocosms receiving different light irradiances at the beginning and the end of the experiment and during phytoplankton growth. In total, 46 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with ≥1% relative abundance occurred (22–34 OTUs per mesocosm). OTUs were affiliated mainly with Rhodobacteraceae, Flavobacteriaceae and Alteromonadaceae. The four mesocosms shared 11 abundant OTUs. Dominance increased at the beginning of phytoplankton growth in all treatments and decreased thereafter. Maximum dominance was found in the mesocosms with high irradiances. Overall, specific bacterial OTUs had different responses in terms of relative abundance under in situ and high light intensities, and an early phytoplankton bloom resulted in different bacterial community structures both at high (family) and low (OTU) taxonomic levels. Thus, bacterial community structure and succession are affected by light regime, both directly and indirectly, which may have implications for an ecosystem’s response to environmental changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity of Marine Microbes)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Hydrographic Variability on the Distribution of Microbial Communities in Taiwan Strait in Winter
Diversity 2019, 11(10), 193; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11100193 - 14 Oct 2019
Abstract
This study investigated the spatial variation in the components of a microbial food web (viruses, picoplankton, nanoflagellates, and ciliates) in different hydrographic environments in the Taiwan Strait during winter. Water temperature and salinity varied spatially, with lower temperatures (15.3–22.8 °C) and salinities (32.2–33.4 [...] Read more.
This study investigated the spatial variation in the components of a microbial food web (viruses, picoplankton, nanoflagellates, and ciliates) in different hydrographic environments in the Taiwan Strait during winter. Water temperature and salinity varied spatially, with lower temperatures (15.3–22.8 °C) and salinities (32.2–33.4 psu) in the northern part of the Taiwan Strait, largely affected by runoff from the coast of China. Concentrations of nutrients and Chl a were significantly higher in the northern part than that in the southern part of the study area. Synechococcus spp., nanoflagellate, and ciliate abundance also varied significantly, with the northern strait having higher abundances of these communities. In contrast, a higher abundance of bacteria was found in the southern part of the Taiwan Strait. The results of this study, which describes two different ecosystems in the Taiwan Strait, suggest that during winter, a “viral loop” might play an important role in controlling bacterial production in the southern part of the Taiwan Strait, while nanofalgellate grazing of picophytoplankton may contribute mainly to the flux of energy in the northern part. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity of Marine Microbes)
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Open AccessArticle
Phytoplankton Blooms, Red Tides and Mucilaginous Aggregates in the Urban Thessaloniki Bay, Eastern Mediterranean
Diversity 2019, 11(8), 136; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11080136 - 14 Aug 2019
Abstract
We investigated the plankton community composition and abundance in the urban marine environment of Thessaloniki Bay. We collected water samples weekly from March 2017 to February 2018 at the coastal front of Thessaloniki city center and monthly samples from three other inshore sites [...] Read more.
We investigated the plankton community composition and abundance in the urban marine environment of Thessaloniki Bay. We collected water samples weekly from March 2017 to February 2018 at the coastal front of Thessaloniki city center and monthly samples from three other inshore sites along the urban front of the bay. During the study period, conspicuous and successive phytoplankton blooms, dominated by known mucilage-producing diatoms alternated with red tide events formed by the dinoflagellates Noctiluca scintillans and Spatulodinium pseudonoctiluca, and an extensive mucilage aggregate phenomenon, which appeared in late June 2017. At least 11 known harmful algae were identified throughout the study, with the increase in the abundance of the known harmful dinoflagellate Dinophysis cf. acuminata occurring in October and November 2017. Finally, a red tide caused by the photosynthetic ciliate Mesodinium rubrum on December 2017 was conspicuous throughout the sampling sites. The above-mentioned harmful blooms and red tides were linked to high nutrient concentrations and eutrophication. This paper provides an overview of eutrophication impacts on the response of the unicellular eukaryotic plankton organisms and their impact on water quality and ecosystem services. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity of Marine Microbes)
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