Special Issue "Community Ecology, Macroecological Patterns and Conservation of Tropical Beetles"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Biodiversity Loss & Dynamics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Luca Luiselli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Development Ecology Conservation and Cooperation Via G. Tomasi di Lampedusa 33 I, 00144 Rome, Italy
Interests: community ecology; reptile biology and conservation; tropical reptile ecology; chelonian conservation; reptile population biology; reptile dietary habits and foraging ecology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Giovanni Amori
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche—Istituto di Ricerca Sugli Ecosistemi Terrestri, Viale dell’Università 32, 00185 Rome, Italy
Interests: phylogeography; ecology; areography; systematics; taxonomy; evolution; conservation of mammals
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tropical regions host a large variety of animal species, representing the “hotspot” of biological diversity across the Earth. On the other hand, insects represent the great majority of animal species throughout the world, and Coleoptera (= beetles) constitute the largest order of living insects (about 350,000 species overall, spread in 235 families). Therefore, the “interaction” between “tropics” and “beetles” certainly represents one of the most extraordinarily models for analyzing life, ecology, and conservation. Nonetheless, beetles are strongly overlooked by the IUCN Red List and other major conservation organizations, and their tropical species have been so far mostly neglected also by community ecology and macroecology studies.

In this Special Volume, we emphasize studies on community ecology and macroecology of tropical beetles, without prejudice for any beetle family, biome or geographic region within the tropics and subtropics. We will also emphasize the conservation issues that mean that many groups/species may currently suffer from a plethora of local and general threats (from deforestation to overcollecting, from pollution to climate change). Thus, we are happy to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue with the latest and most updated research from both you and your colleagues.

Prof. Dr. Luca Luiselli
Dr. Giovanni Amori
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • coleoptera
  • ecology
  • conservation
  • patterns at different spatial scales

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Community Ecology, Macro-Ecological Patterns, and Conservation of Tropical Beetles: An Introduction
Diversity 2021, 13(9), 406; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13090406 - 26 Aug 2021
Viewed by 373
Abstract
Tropical regions host a large variety of animal species, representing the richest concentrations of biological diversity across the Earth [...] Full article
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Research

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Communication
Decline of the Commercially Attractive White Morph in Goliath Beetle Polymorphic Populations
Diversity 2021, 13(8), 388; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13080388 - 18 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 804
Abstract
The Goliath beetle (Goliathus goliatus) is one of the largest and most commercially valuable (for collection exports) beetle species worldwide, and occurs in West and Central Africa, with polymorphic populations being found in Benin, Eastern Nigeria, and Western Cameroun. The white [...] Read more.
The Goliath beetle (Goliathus goliatus) is one of the largest and most commercially valuable (for collection exports) beetle species worldwide, and occurs in West and Central Africa, with polymorphic populations being found in Benin, Eastern Nigeria, and Western Cameroun. The white morph is the most commercially valuable, and therefore is actively searched for by hunters and dealers. In a long-term, opportunistically conducted study in south-eastern Nigeria, we documented a substantial decline of the white morph compared to the normally coloured brown morph, although an overall decline in the number of observed beetles was evident for both colour morphs. Although a combination of reasons may have caused the white form decline, it is likely that overcollecting was the primary threat behind the observed pattern. Therefore, we urge the competent authorities to better protect the polymorphic populations of these giant beetles and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to make a quick assessment for eventual inclusion of the species among the threatened taxa Red List. Full article
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