Diversity and Biogeography of Microcrustaceans in Continental Waters

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Freshwater Biodiversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 6672

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russian Academy of Sciences, 119071 Moscow, Russia
Interests: Copepoda ecology, biogeography, and systematics; tropical brachyuran crabs; spatio-temporal patterns of meiofauna assemblages; science communication
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biological Faculty, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow, Russia
Interests: Cladocera ecology, biogeography, and taxonomy; species diversity and structural composition of freshwater microcrustacean assemblages; Arctic islands and insular fauna; science communication
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microcrustacea (Cladocera, Copepoda, Ostracoda, etc.) constitute a very diverse taxonomic group, including both parasitic and free-living organisms that inhabit marine areas, estuaries, and freshwater ecosystems. They play a key role in the communities of continental water bodies of different hydrological types: from wet soils and groundwater to lakes and hypersaline lagoons. Microcrustacea are among the major consumers of primary phytoplankton in terrestrial water bodies and bacteria in cave ecosystems. Their complex interactions with the environment and other organisms influence a wide range of biogenic processes that determine the community structure of a water body. Crustaceans are often the edificatory species that modify the environment for other aquatic organisms. Due to their high sensitivity to the impacts of anthropogenic factors, microcrustacean taxa can be used for the monitoring of environmental pollution and climate change. This Special Issue, entitled "Diversity and Biogeography of Microcrustaceans in Continental Waters" is devoted to an integrated analysis of crustaceans, covering studies at both species and taxocenosis levels, as well as ecosystem management and the sustainable use of continental waters.

The topics of the Special Issue cover three main aspects—1. Advances in taxonomy, phylogeny, and biogeography: Important aspects of taxonomy, phylogeny, and evolutionary biology of microcrustacean taxa, including phylogenetic systematics, will be discussed. Studies of organisms in continental bodies of water, including the Caspian Sea and the Aral Sea, that are hydrologically related to lakes are welcome. 2. Ecosystem interactions:, including spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of taxocenoses. Studies of the spatial and temporal patterns of microcrustacean variability in freshwater and brackish–water ecosystems are welcome, including a discussion of factor regulation processes and how these affect biogenic patterns. 3. Microcrustaceans and their response to natural and anthropogenic influences. Research papers evaluating the effects of climate and environmental changes under anthropogenic pressure on benthic and planktonic microcrustacean taxocenoses are invited. Priority will be given to research performed in natural communities rather than in artificial laboratory microcosms used for toxicological studies.

Therefore, almost any aspect related to taxonomy, phylogeny, ecology, and biogeography of microcrustaceans can find a place in the pages of this Special Issue.

Dr. Elena S. Chertoprud
Dr. Anna A. Novichkova
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • freshwater microcrustacea
  • brackish–water microcrustacea
  • taxonomy
  • phylogeny
  • ecology
  • biogeography

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 4472 KiB  
Article
Resettlement of Eurytemora velox (Crustacea: Copepoda) in Europe, the Urals and Western Siberia
by Natalia Sukhikh, Petr Garibian and Elena Chertoprud
Diversity 2024, 16(1), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/d16010047 - 11 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1110
Abstract
The recent distribution of the Ponto-Caspian calanoid copepod, Eurytemora velox, in Western and Eastern Europe has been well-documented; however, there are no studies on the genetic diversity of the recently discovered Western Siberian species population. To contribute towards filling this gap, genetic [...] Read more.
The recent distribution of the Ponto-Caspian calanoid copepod, Eurytemora velox, in Western and Eastern Europe has been well-documented; however, there are no studies on the genetic diversity of the recently discovered Western Siberian species population. To contribute towards filling this gap, genetic diversity and distribution were investigated for E. velox collected in the Urals and Western Siberia of the Russian Federation to compare with the European populations. In this study, 44 specimens were dissected for the morphological studies, and 22 specimens of E. velox from different geographical points were analyzed for mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (CO1), nuclear ITS1-ITS2 (nITS) and nuclear ribosomal RNA (18SrRNA) gene fragments. Analysis of the CO1 gene region showed that the studied populations from the Urals and Western Siberia differ significantly from European ones and represent a separate genetic line. However, the nuclear nITS and 18SrRNA genes, as well as the results of morphological analysis, did not show such isolation of the Trans-Ural populations from those in Europe. As in many studies on E. velox, we found atypical structural features of the fifth prosomal leg among females in the Ob Bay. Their share was 36% of the number of studied individuals. The CO1 shows that the divergence of genetic lines occurred approximately in the Middle Pleistocene, and the species itself is Paleogene–Neogene by origin. Based on these data, a different scenario of E. velox distribution or possible refuge survival is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity and Biogeography of Microcrustaceans in Continental Waters)
Show Figures

Figure 1

21 pages, 1949 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Salinity Gradient and Island Isolation on Fauna Composition and Structure of Aquatic Invertebrate Communities of the Shantar Islands (Khabarovsk Krai)
by Anna A. Novichkova, Rostislav R. Borisov, Lada V. Vorobjeva, Dmitry M. Palatov, Mikhail V. Chertoprud and Elena S. Chertoprud
Diversity 2023, 15(12), 1198; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15121198 - 6 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1196
Abstract
The present study is the first structured attempt to analyze the species composition and distribution of freshwater invertebrates in the lakes, streams, and rivers of the Shantar Islands and to compare the diversity of the hydrobiont fauna of the archipelago and the continental [...] Read more.
The present study is the first structured attempt to analyze the species composition and distribution of freshwater invertebrates in the lakes, streams, and rivers of the Shantar Islands and to compare the diversity of the hydrobiont fauna of the archipelago and the continental part of Khabarovsk Krai on the basis of the original and literature data. The research revealed 57 zooplanktonic, 47 meiobenthic, and 142 macrobenthic taxa in the waters of the island and the adjacent continental areas. Different patterns of variability in the species richness, abundance, and the community structure are observed for different groups of hydrobionts along the salinity gradient in the unique, brackish Lake Bolshoe. Zooplankton show no directional variability, reaching a maximum in a frontal zone where riverine and brackish water mix. Meiobenthos show the highest diversity in the most saline zone of the lake, where marine species are abundant. The characteristics of the macrozoobenthos gradually increase with the salinity of the lake, with a dramatic change in the dominance structure at the critical salinity threshold, where amphibiotic insects, dominant in the desalinated water zone, are replaced by amphipods. Latitudinal variability in species richness and biogeographic structure of the fauna are closely related for different groups of freshwater invertebrates. A smooth decline in species richness from southern to northern areas was observed when comparing the faunas of the Shantar water bodies with those located to the south. This trend is shown for amphibiotic insects and microcrustaceans and is most pronounced for mollusks. The fauna of the Shantar Islands is predominantly represented by species with a wide Palaearctic, Holarctic, and cosmopolitan range, with a small proportion of species restricted to the Arctic zone of Eurasia or specific to Eastern Siberia and the Far East. Only three brackish water species have a Beringian type of distribution. The assemblage structures of the zooplankton and meiobenthos communities of continental coastal and island lakes do not greatly differ. On the contrary, brackish communities are clearly distinct from the others. The taxonomic composition of macroinvertebrates differed significantly between the islands and the mainland. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity and Biogeography of Microcrustaceans in Continental Waters)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 788 KiB  
Article
The Current State of Zooplankton Diversity in the Middle Caspian Sea during Spring
by Moldir Aubakirova, Zhanara Mazhibayeva, Saule Zh. Assylbekova, Kuanysh B. Isbekov, Bekzhan Barbol, Zamira Bolatbekova, Nurgul Jussupbekova, Aidana Moldrakhman and Gulmira Satybaldiyeva
Diversity 2023, 15(7), 798; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15070798 - 21 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1458
Abstract
The study of planktonic animals of the Caspian Sea is topical and, during the last centuries, has brought and continues to bring new results. This is an inevitable process attributed to the introduction of non-indigenous predatory representatives of zooplankton by ballast water of [...] Read more.
The study of planktonic animals of the Caspian Sea is topical and, during the last centuries, has brought and continues to bring new results. This is an inevitable process attributed to the introduction of non-indigenous predatory representatives of zooplankton by ballast water of ships. During the study period, the zooplankton of the Middle Caspian Sea was represented by 13 taxa and consisted mainly of non-indigenous species typical of the Palearctic region. Native fauna was represented by three species—cladoceran Evadne anonyx, Podonevadne camptonyx, and copepod Halicyclops sarsi during the study period. The quantitative variables of zooplankton did not reach a high level in May 2020 and 2021 compared to the data of previous years. Cladocerans Podonevadne camptonyx, copepods Acartia tonsa, and larvae of Cirripedia dominated in 2020. By 2021, the dominant species of last year had been replaced by the cladoceran Evadne nordmanni. One-way ANOVA analysis detected significant differences in the quantitative variables of cladocerans and copepods between different years of zooplankton study. The decreasing abundance, biomass, and alteration of the dominant zooplankton species in the Middle Caspian Sea during the study period may be associated with the feeding type of predator species and a slight elevation of water salinity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity and Biogeography of Microcrustaceans in Continental Waters)
Show Figures

Figure 1

21 pages, 3259 KiB  
Article
The Role of Old Relicts in Structuring the Boreal/Tropical Transitional Zone: The Case of East Asian Planktonic Cladocera (Crustacea)
by Ivan I. Krolenko, Petr G. Garibian and Alexey A. Kotov
Diversity 2023, 15(6), 713; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15060713 - 27 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 961
Abstract
Previous studies provided evidence of the mixing of boreal–tropical cladocerans (Crustacea) in the Far East of Eurasia, as well as the presence of numerous pre-Pleistocene relict endemics. In this study, we hypothesize that the colonization history is reflected in the proportions of endemic/boreal/tropical [...] Read more.
Previous studies provided evidence of the mixing of boreal–tropical cladocerans (Crustacea) in the Far East of Eurasia, as well as the presence of numerous pre-Pleistocene relict endemics. In this study, we hypothesize that the colonization history is reflected in the proportions of endemic/boreal/tropical taxa among different habitat types within this region. We analyzed 442 qualitative samples collected from seven sub-regions of the Far East of Russia and South Korea along a latitudinal transect of approximately 2200 km, where we identified 101 Cladocera species. Our results showed a significantly higher proportion of endemic taxa in the plankton compared to the littoral and benthic zones. The proportions of endemic/boreal/tropical taxa in the permanent and temporary waters were similar. We observed a distinct shift in dominance in benthos and littoral zone across our transect: boreal taxa were prevalent in the northern sub-regions (1–4), while tropical taxa were prevalent in the southern sub-regions (5–7), with a pronounced boreal–tropical transition zone (sub-regions 4–5). Our findings suggest that this pattern arose due to the unhindered dispersion of the two faunas in a latitudinal direction until they met at the boundary during their arrival in the Late Pleistocene. In contrast, the proportions of the boreal and tropical taxa in plankton did not exceed 16% in any of the studied sub-regions, and the proportion of boreal taxa decreased from 16% to 10%, while that of the tropical taxa increased from 0% to 10% from north to south. We propose that the lower proportions and the absence of mixing of fauna in the plankton can be explained by the strong presence (sometimes dominance) of relics that occupy these water bodies before the arrival of colonizers from the north and south. Our findings highlight the significant role of biotic interactions in the formation of biogeographic boundaries, which was previously underestimated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity and Biogeography of Microcrustaceans in Continental Waters)
Show Figures

Figure 1

27 pages, 33137 KiB  
Article
Insights on the Existence of Ancient Glacial Refugee in the Northern Black/Azov Sea Lowland, with the Description of the First Stygobiotic Microcrustacean Species of the Genus Niphargus Schiödte, 1849 from the Mouth of the Don River
by Ivan N. Marin and Dmitry M. Palatov
Diversity 2023, 15(5), 682; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15050682 - 18 May 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1244
Abstract
A new species of the genus Niphargus Schiödte, 1849 (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Niphargidae), co-existing with other stygobiotic amphipods, Diasynurella kiwi Marin and Palatov, 2023 and Pontonyx donensis (Martynov, 1919) (Crangonyctidae), is described from a small spring on a shore of Kiziterinka River in Rostov-on-Don [...] Read more.
A new species of the genus Niphargus Schiödte, 1849 (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Niphargidae), co-existing with other stygobiotic amphipods, Diasynurella kiwi Marin and Palatov, 2023 and Pontonyx donensis (Martynov, 1919) (Crangonyctidae), is described from a small spring on a shore of Kiziterinka River in Rostov-on-Don City in the mouth of the Don River. Two of the three species in the studied spring, D. kiwi and the discovered Niphargus, belong to microcrustaceans not exceeding the total body size of 3 mm. The new species, Niphargus rostovi sp. nov., represents one of the smallest species within the genus and is mostly related to the Greek Niphargus karkabounasi Ntakis, Anastasiadou, Zakšek and Fišer, 2015, which is also not reaching the body size of 3 mm. One more related undescribed species is found on the Crete Island by the molecular genetic data. These species represent a separate phylogenetic lineage within the “carpathicus” species complex, which diverged from the congeners in the Late Miocene for more than 10 Mya. At the same time, the speciation within the ingroup started about 5–6 Mya, obviously correlating with the drainage of the Euxinian basin of the Eastern Paratethys, connecting the lower Don and southern Greece areas. Niphargus potamophilus Birštein, 1954 is also first recorded from the mouth of the Belbek River in the Crimean Peninsula, closing the known area from the Kuban River delta to Rostov-on-Don area and further along the western coast of the Black Sea to Bulgaria. Analysis of the recent records of long-time lineages of endemic/subterranean/stygobiotic animals unable to disperse for long distances assumed that glacial refugium existed at the mouth of the Don River, along with the South Caucasus (Colchis) and the southern Caspian (Hyrcania), where many species have survived several periods of glaciation since the late Miocene. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity and Biogeography of Microcrustaceans in Continental Waters)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop