Special Issue "Biological Invasions: Selected Papers from NEOBIOTA 2020"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Biodiversity Loss & Dynamics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Sven Jelaska
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: invasive plants; biodiversity; spatial analyses; modelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Twenty years after the first NEOBIOTA Conference was organised, “11th International Conference on Biological Invasions: The Human Role in Biological Invasions - a case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde?” will be held 15-18 September, 2020, in Vodice, Croatia, under unusual circumstances due to Covid-19 pandemic. Despite this, research and management of biological invasions has to continue, keeping NEOBIOTA Conference an excellent stage for exchanging international scientific knowledge to cope with biological invasions, and offering an outstanding venue for networking especially for young researchers. Our comprehension on alien species is continuously increasing, as is the number of challenges caused by the alien species. Humans, as both the driving force and the main ecological engineer nowadays, play a crucial role in alien species invasions as well, sharing a role that has two faces or two mutually opposite characters, just as was the case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella. We are responsible for the dispersal of alien species (on purpose or accidentally), and creating (disturbed) habitats that are suitable for alien species to become invasive. However, we also are trying to manage and control them, to increase public awareness and increase citizen science activities. All aspects of biological invasions will be covered during the conference.

Selected papers that were presented at the congress are invited to submit their extended versions to this Special Issue of the journal Diversity after the conference. Submitted papers should be extended to the size of regular research or review articles, with at least a 50% extension of new results. All submitted papers will undergo our standard peer-review procedure. Accepted papers will be published in open-access format in Diversity and collected together in the Special Issue website. There are no page limitations for this journal.

Prof. Dr. Sven Jelaska
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biogeography and macroecology
  • management
  • citizen science
  • impact
  • species interactions and ecological networks
  • changing environment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
The Effect of Cutting and Waterlogging on Plant-Related CO2 and N2O Fluxes Associated with the Invasive N-Fixing Species Gunnera tinctoria
Diversity 2021, 13(9), 427; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13090427 - 04 Sep 2021
Viewed by 511
Abstract
The overall impact that plant invasions have on greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by plant-mediated effects and how these interact with environmental and management factors is largely unknown. To address this, we report on the effects of leaf removal and waterlogging, either singularly or [...] Read more.
The overall impact that plant invasions have on greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by plant-mediated effects and how these interact with environmental and management factors is largely unknown. To address this, we report on the effects of leaf removal and waterlogging, either singularly or in combination, on the fluxes of CO2 and N2O associated with the invasive species Gunnera tinctoria. Both the removal of leaves with and without flooding resulted in higher CO2 emissions due to reductions in photosynthesis. Whilst waterlogging alone was also associated with a reduction in photosynthesis, this was slower than the effect of leaf removal. Significant N2O emissions were associated with intact plants, which increased immediately after leaf removal, or seven days after waterlogging with or without leaf removal. We found positive correlations between CO2 and N2O emissions and petiole and rhizome areas, indicating a size-dependent effect. Our results demonstrate that intact plants of G. tinctoria are a source of N2O emissions, which is enhanced, albeit transiently, by the removal of leaves. Consequently, management interventions on invasive plant populations that involve the removal of above-ground material, or waterlogging, would not only reduce CO2 uptake, but would further compromise the ecosystem GHG balance through enhanced N2O emissions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Invasions: Selected Papers from NEOBIOTA 2020)
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Article
Mass Mortality of Invasive Snails: Impact of Nutrient Release on Littoral Water Quality
Diversity 2021, 13(8), 362; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13080362 - 05 Aug 2021
Viewed by 492
Abstract
Mollusks are the macroinvertebrates most commonly introduced into fresh water. In invaded reservoirs, alien mollusks form a large biomass due to their large size. Climate change, water level regulation, and anthropogenic impacts on the environment lead to the drying up of water bodies [...] Read more.
Mollusks are the macroinvertebrates most commonly introduced into fresh water. In invaded reservoirs, alien mollusks form a large biomass due to their large size. Climate change, water level regulation, and anthropogenic impacts on the environment lead to the drying up of water bodies and the death of littoral macroinvertebrates. To assess the impact of invasive snail mass mortality on water quality, laboratory experiments on the snail tissue decomposition were performed, the potential release of nutrients into aquatic ecosystems was calculated, and the predicted concentrations of nutrients were verified by field studies. The laboratory experiment showed quick decomposition of the common river snail Viviparus viviparus tissues with release into the environment of ammonium and total phosphorus of 2.72 ± 0.14 mg and 0.10 ± 0.02 mg, respectively, per gram of decomposing tissue. The concentrations of ammonium, nitrates, and total phosphorus at the site of snail death reached 2.70 ± 0.10, 3.13 ± 0.38 and 0.30 ± 0.02 mg/L, respectively. This indicates local contamination of the Novosibirsk reservoir littoral with decomposition products. The aquatic management, water level regulation, and control of undesirable species should take into account the likelihood of water quality decreasing as a result of macroinvertebrate mass mortality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Invasions: Selected Papers from NEOBIOTA 2020)
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Article
Feeding Habits of Predatory Thermophilic Fish Species and Species with Subtropical Affinity from Recently Extended Distributional Range in Northeast Adriatic Sea, Croatia
Diversity 2021, 13(8), 357; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13080357 - 03 Aug 2021
Viewed by 663
Abstract
The study investigates feeding habits of thermophilic species and species with subtropical affinity in the fishing catch in the Bay of Medulin (northeastern Adriatic Sea), and contributes to the knowledge about their presence in recently extended distributional range. In our methodology, the presence [...] Read more.
The study investigates feeding habits of thermophilic species and species with subtropical affinity in the fishing catch in the Bay of Medulin (northeastern Adriatic Sea), and contributes to the knowledge about their presence in recently extended distributional range. In our methodology, the presence of the Seriola dumerili, Sphyraena sphyraena, Lichia amia, Coryphaena hippurus, Caranx crysos, Pomatomus saltatrix, and incidence of Trachinotus ovatus is recorded. A total of 220 specimens are captured during 2017, 2018 and 2019. A dietary assessment is performed, and the index of relative importance IRI was calculated for each prey category. Diet overlap is calculated using Schoener’s index, based on IRI. The principal diet of C. hippurus included Sardina pilchardus and Loligo vulgaris. Pomatomus saltatrix consumed species from the Sparidae family and T. ovatus crustaceans from the Mysidacea family. Different species from genus Atherina are represented important foods for L. amia, S. dumerili and S. sphyraena. Diets of significant importance for L. amia included fishes from the family Sparidae, for S. sphyraena from the Carangidae family, and S. dumerili from the Clupeidae and Muliidae families. Our analysis of diet overlap is based on IRI suggests no diet overlap between analysed fish species from Medulin Bay, and that these species utilise differing trophic niches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Invasions: Selected Papers from NEOBIOTA 2020)
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Article
Risk of Invasive Lupinus polyphyllus Seed Survival in Biomass Treatment Processes
Diversity 2021, 13(6), 264; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13060264 - 11 Jun 2021
Viewed by 841
Abstract
Invasive plant species threaten native species and habitats causing ecologic, economic and social burden. When creating climate friendly solutions by utilizing plant biomasses in biogas and fertilizer production, safety should be ensured concerning the use of residues. This study concentrates on the treatment [...] Read more.
Invasive plant species threaten native species and habitats causing ecologic, economic and social burden. When creating climate friendly solutions by utilizing plant biomasses in biogas and fertilizer production, safety should be ensured concerning the use of residues. This study concentrates on the treatment of biomasses containing invasive plant material by tunnel and windrow composting, and by farm-scale and laboratory-scale anaerobic digestion (AD) in mesophilic conditions. Germination of the nationally settled and harmful invasive species Lupinus polyphyllus Lindl. was investigated after these processes. In addition, the role of the conditions found in the processes that destroyed seeds were studied, such as the time of exposure, temperature and static pressure. Dormant seeds are well protected against harsh conditions and can survive through various stress factors, but also become vulnerable as more factors are combined and time of exposure is extended. Our results suggest that the risks involved for the utilization of harmful invasive species increase with mesophilic temperatures and single treatments if the processing conditions are not stabile. One-month treatment with windrow composting showed a high risk for dormant seeds of L. polyphyllus seeds to survive, whereby extending the processing time reduced it substantially. Hard coated seeds can thus be broken with a combination of thermophilic temperatures, moisture and static pressure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Invasions: Selected Papers from NEOBIOTA 2020)
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