Special Issue "Urinalysis and Urinary Tract Infections in Elderly Hospitalized Patients"

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Paul Froom
E-Mail
Guest Editor
School of Public Health, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel
Interests: clinical utility; urinary tract infections; elderly, internal medicine; laboratory testing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The purpose of this Special Issue is threefold. First, we will review various methods for urinalysis, including the more recently introduced automated technology. Second, we will discuss the clinical utility and disutility of various findings. Finally, we will discuss indications for testing. We will limit our discussion to testing, abnormal findings, and diseases in the elderly.

Prof. Dr. Paul Froom
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Atypical Presentation of Bacteremic Urinary Tract Infection in Older Patients: Frequency and Prognostic Impact
Diagnostics 2021, 11(3), 523; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11030523 - 15 Mar 2021
Viewed by 225
Abstract
In older patients, urinary tract infection (UTI) often has an atypical clinical presentation, making its diagnosis difficult. We aimed to describe the clinical presentation in older inpatients with UTI-related bacteremia and to determine the prognostic impact of atypical presentation. This cohort study included [...] Read more.
In older patients, urinary tract infection (UTI) often has an atypical clinical presentation, making its diagnosis difficult. We aimed to describe the clinical presentation in older inpatients with UTI-related bacteremia and to determine the prognostic impact of atypical presentation. This cohort study included all consecutive patients older than 75 years hospitalized in a university hospital in 2019 with a UTI-related gram-negative bacillus (GNB) bacteremia, defined by blood and urine cultures positive for the same GNB, and followed up for 90 days. Patients with typical symptoms of UTI were compared to patients with atypical forms. Among 3865 inpatients over 75 with GNB-positive urine culture over the inclusion period, 105 patients (2.7%) with bacteremic UTI were included (mean age 85.3 ± 5.9, 61.9% female). Among them, UTI symptoms were reported in only 38 patients (36.2%) and 44 patients (41.9%) had no fever on initial management. Initial diagnosis of UTI was made in only 58% of patient. Mortality at 90 days was 23.6%. After adjustment for confounders, hyperthermia (HR = 0.37; IC95 (0.14–0.97)) and early UTI diagnosis (HR = 0.35; IC95 (0.13–0.94)) were associated with lower mortality, while UTI symptoms were not associated with prognosis. In conclusion, only one third of older patients with UTI developing bacteremia had UTI symptoms. However, early UTI diagnosis was associated with better survival. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop