Diagnostics in Critical Care

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Point-of-Care Diagnostics and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 1039

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Early screening and recognition of severe medical and surgical illnesses, advanced and rush prehospital care of urgent conditions, organized immediate care in trauma centers and development of in-hospital rapid response teams has led to an increase of intensive care patients and survival of severe conditions in the last few decades. In the intensive care setting, bedside diagnostic tools are essential for good quality of care, early recognition of complications and treatment of critically ill patients. Due to very unstable patients, complex monitoring and often diverse robust organ support systems (extracorporeal heart, lungs kidneys, liver support, etc.) diagnostics need to be brought to the patient's bed. Intensive care treatment of medical patients, patients after cardiothoracic or major abdominal surgery, polytraumatized and all other critically ill patients is currently incomprehensible without continuously sophisticated monitoring, bedside ultrasonography, diverse radiologic diagnostic techniques, point of care coagulation management and laboratory and other diagnostic modalities. In the time of the COVID-19 pandemic, the information on the use of different radiologic techniques, on revolutionary use of ultrasonography in lungs investigation, diverse laboratory tests primarily for COVID-19 diagnosis and furthermore for early recognition of potentially fatal complications and their prevention is increasing and should be properly addressed.

Furthermore, diagnostic techniques are rapidly emerging as an important and irreplaceable tool in the hands of intensive care physicians; therefore, the main goal of this second volume Special Issue is to update on and summarize diverse diagnostic modalities and diagnostic approaches in the intensive care setting, specially focusing on the point of care approach.

Dr. Sasa Rajsic
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • intensive care
  • critical care
  • critically ill
  • point of care
  • bedside
  • monitoring
  • ultrasonography
  • radiologic diagnostic
  • coagulation
  • COVID-19
  • emergency
  • prehospital

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 2780 KiB  
Article
ECMO in Myocardial Infarction-Associated Cardiogenic Shock: Blood Biomarkers as Predictors of Mortality
by Thomas Senoner, Benedikt Treml, Robert Breitkopf, Ulvi Cenk Oezpeker, Nicole Innerhofer, Christine Eckhardt, Aleksandra Radovanovic Spurnic and Sasa Rajsic
Diagnostics 2023, 13(24), 3683; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics13243683 - 17 Dec 2023
Viewed by 815
Abstract
Background: Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (va-ECMO) can provide circulatory and respiratory support in patients with cardiogenic shock. The main aim of this work was to investigate the association of blood biomarkers with mortality in patients with myocardial infarction needing va-ECMO support. Methods: We [...] Read more.
Background: Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (va-ECMO) can provide circulatory and respiratory support in patients with cardiogenic shock. The main aim of this work was to investigate the association of blood biomarkers with mortality in patients with myocardial infarction needing va-ECMO support. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed electronic medical charts from patients receiving va-ECMO support in the period from 2008 to 2021 at the Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Results: Of 188 patients, 57% (108/188) survived to discharge, with hemorrhage (46%) and thrombosis (27%) as the most frequent adverse events. Procalcitonin levels were markedly higher in non-survivors compared with survivors during the observation period. The multivariable model identified higher blood levels of procalcitonin (HR 1.01, p = 0.002) as a laboratory parameter associated with a higher risk of mortality. Conclusions: In our study population of patients with myocardial infarction-associated cardiogenic shock, deceased patients had increased levels of inflammatory blood biomarkers throughout the whole study period. Increased procalcitonin levels have been associated with a higher risk of mortality. Future studies are needed to show the role of procalcitonin in patients receiving ECMO support. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnostics in Critical Care)
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