Special Issue "Management and Health Care in Pediatric Dentistry"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2016).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Barbara Cvikl
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Conservative Dentistry and Periodontology, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna, Austria
Interests: restorative dentistry; laser dentistry; cell culture
Prof. Dr. Katrin Bekes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Medical University of Vienna, Sensengasse 2a, A-1090 Vienna, Austria
Interests: pediatric dentistry; conservative dentistry; oral health related quality of life
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Management and Health Care in Pediatric Dentistry is still, unfortunately, a red-hot topic. The incidence of tooth decay in children and adolescents has declined from the early 1970s, due to fluoride toothpaste and improved oral hygiene. However, there is, evidence that this decrease in caries is partially reversing again, especially in the younger age groups, in lower socioeconomic groups and in children with migration background or of ethnic minority groups. For children ages 2 to 5, 70% of the caries is found in 8% of the population and approximately 40% of children have dental caries by the age of five indicating that Early Childhood Caries (ECC) is a serious public health problem. This special issue "Management and Health Care in Pediatric Dentistry” aims to report new trends in managing caries in pediatric patients. New approaches on how to confront the renewed caries increase should be identified.

Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Early and periodic screening of childhood caries
  • Diagnostics in pediatric patients
  • Treatments in pediatric patients
  • Incidence and prevalence of dental caries in children
  • Caries prevention in children
  • Early childhood caries
  • Treatment needs in childhood caries
  • Fluoridation
  • Remineralization
  • Endodontic treatment in primary teeth
  • Restorative treatment in primary teeth
  • Oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in children

Assoc. Prof. Priv. Doz. Barbara Cvikl
Univ.-Prof. Dr. med. dent. habil. Katrin Bekes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pediatric dentistry
  • Early Childhood Caries
  • primary teeth
  • deciduous teeth
  • mixed dentition
  • oral health-related quality of life

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
Prioritizing the Risk Factors of Severe Early Childhood Caries
Dent. J. 2017, 5(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj5010004 - 06 Jan 2017
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3457
Abstract
Severe early childhood caries remains the most common chronic disease affecting children. The multifactorial etiology of caries has established a controversy about which risk factors were more significant to its development. Therefore, our study aimed through meticulous statistical analysis to arrange the “well [...] Read more.
Severe early childhood caries remains the most common chronic disease affecting children. The multifactorial etiology of caries has established a controversy about which risk factors were more significant to its development. Therefore, our study aimed through meticulous statistical analysis to arrange the “well agreed upon” common risk factors in order of significance, to aid the clinician in tailoring an adequate preventive program. The study prioritized or reshuffled the risk factors contributing to severe early childhood caries and placed them in the order of their significance as follows: snacking of sugary food several times a day, increased number of siblings to three or more, night feeding, child self-employed brushing, mother’s caries experience, two siblings, on demand feeding, once/day sugary food, sharing utensils, one sibling, male gender, father’s education, late first dental visit, brushing time, mother’s education, no dental visit, decreased brushing frequency, and no night brushing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management and Health Care in Pediatric Dentistry)
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Article
Behavior Assessment in Children Following Hospital-Based General Anesthesia versus Office-Based General Anesthesia
Dent. J. 2016, 4(3), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj4030027 - 15 Aug 2016
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2310
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in behavior exist following dental treatment under hospital-based general anesthesia (HBGA) or office-based general anesthesia (OBGA) in the percentage of patients exhibiting positive behavior and in the mean Frankl scores at recall visits. [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in behavior exist following dental treatment under hospital-based general anesthesia (HBGA) or office-based general anesthesia (OBGA) in the percentage of patients exhibiting positive behavior and in the mean Frankl scores at recall visits. This retrospective study examined records of a pediatric dental office over a 4 year period. Patients presenting before 48 months of age for an initial exam who were diagnosed with early childhood caries were included in the study. Following an initial exam, patients were treated under HBGA or OBGA. Patients were followed to determine their behavior at 6-, 12- and 18-month recall appointments. Fifty-four patients received treatment under HBGA and 26 were treated under OBGA. OBGA patients were significantly more likely to exhibit positive behavior at the 6- and 12-month recall visits p = 0.038 & p = 0.029). Clinicians should consider future behavior when determining general anesthesia treatment modalities in children with early childhood caries presenting to their office. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management and Health Care in Pediatric Dentistry)
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Review

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Review
Public Health Aspects of Paediatric Dental Treatment under General Anaesthetic
Dent. J. 2016, 4(2), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj4020020 - 08 Jun 2016
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 3275
Abstract
Early childhood caries (ECC) has negative psychosocial effects on children, with chronic pain, changed eating habits, disrupted sleep and altered growth very common, and it disrupts the day-to-day lives of their families. The treatment of young children with ECC places a considerable burden [...] Read more.
Early childhood caries (ECC) has negative psychosocial effects on children, with chronic pain, changed eating habits, disrupted sleep and altered growth very common, and it disrupts the day-to-day lives of their families. The treatment of young children with ECC places a considerable burden on health systems, with a considerable amount having to be provided under general anaesthesia (GA), which is resource-intensive. Justifying its use requires evidence of the efficacy of treatment in improving the lives of affected children and their families. This paper discusses the available evidence and then makes some suggestions for a research agenda. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management and Health Care in Pediatric Dentistry)

Other

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Case Report
Bilateral Transverse Mandibular Second Molars: A Case Report
Dent. J. 2016, 4(4), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj4040043 - 22 Nov 2016
Viewed by 2088
Abstract
Impaction of mandibular second permanent molars is a rare occurrence, with prevalence rates reported to be between 0.65% and 2.0%. In the absence of systemic conditions, impactions are usually unilateral. There appears to be no consensus as to the optimal treatment for impacted [...] Read more.
Impaction of mandibular second permanent molars is a rare occurrence, with prevalence rates reported to be between 0.65% and 2.0%. In the absence of systemic conditions, impactions are usually unilateral. There appears to be no consensus as to the optimal treatment for impacted mandibular second molars and treatment plans will be based upon the individual case. Treatment may involve orthodontics and/or various surgical techniques, and early diagnosis is important. This paper presents an unusual case of bilateral transverse impaction of both mandibular second and third molars that was diagnosed at 18 years of age. All impacted molars were extracted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management and Health Care in Pediatric Dentistry)
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Case Report
An Ingested Orthodontic Wire Fragment: A Case Report
Dent. J. 2016, 4(3), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj4030024 - 01 Aug 2016
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2148
Abstract
Accidental ingestion or inhalation of foreign bodies has been widely documented, including incidents which occur whilst undertaking dental treatment. Most ingested objects pass through the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) spontaneously, but approximately 10%–20% need to be removed endoscopically and 1% require surgery. This case [...] Read more.
Accidental ingestion or inhalation of foreign bodies has been widely documented, including incidents which occur whilst undertaking dental treatment. Most ingested objects pass through the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) spontaneously, but approximately 10%–20% need to be removed endoscopically and 1% require surgery. This case reports a complication arising from the accidental loss of an archwire fragment during maxillary archwire placement. It describes the immediate and subsequent management, including the use of radiographs to track the passage of the fragment through the gastro-intestinal tract. This case stresses the vigilance that dentists must take to prevent inhalation or ingestion of foreign bodies and the consequences of time-delays when management decisions are needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management and Health Care in Pediatric Dentistry)
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Comment
Comments on Public Health Aspects of Paediatric Dental Treatment under General Anaesthesia. Dent. J. 2016, 4, 20
Dent. J. 2016, 4(3), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj4030023 - 19 Jul 2016
Viewed by 1927
Abstract
I would like to comment on an article by Thomson [1] recently published in Dentistry Journal.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management and Health Care in Pediatric Dentistry)
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