Special Issue "Oral Health to Global Health: Impact of Nutrition"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Mohammed S. Razzaque

Professor of Pathology, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, 1858 West Grandview Boulevard, Erie, PA 16509, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nutrition; oral health; global health; aging; tumorigenesis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The impact of oral health on systemic diseases are well documented. Studies have shown up to 50% of heart attacks have a strong association with oral bacteria. A close link between periodontal diseases and diabetes, hypertension, neurologic disorders and autoimmune diseases are convincingly demonstrated in large cohorts. More, importantly, oral manifestations are one of the earliest clues of the evolvement of some of these prevalent systemic diseases. As the gap between various branches of medicine and dentistry is closing, a coordinated approach of maintaining optimal oral health would not only reduce commonly encountered systemic diseases, but would also significantly diminish global health burdens.

This Special Issue is intended to bring together different branches of dental, medical and nutritional specialties to share their experiences, with the aim of reducing oral health burden to improve systemic diseases and beyond. This Special Issue welcomes the submission of original manuscripts (unpublished research works), updated reviews (of the existing literature), and brief commentaries (on emerging areas of global health concern).

Dr. Mohammed S. Razzaque
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nutrition
  • Oral health
  • Global health
  • Epidemiology
  • Prevalence and incidence
  • Etiology and pathology
  • Risk factors
  • Prevention
  • Morphology
  • Diagnosis
  • Therapy
  • Periodontal treatment
  • Dental implants
  • Orthodontic treatment
  • Complications
  • Preventive health
  • Experimental models

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Dietary Fiber on the Composition of the Murine Dental Microbiome
Dent. J. 2019, 7(2), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7020058
Received: 22 March 2019 / Revised: 25 April 2019 / Accepted: 13 May 2019 / Published: 1 June 2019
PDF Full-text (2053 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The oral cavity houses a diverse consortium of microorganisms, heavily influenced by host diet, that can mediate dental health and disease. While the impact of dietary carbohydrates to the dental microbiome has been well-documented, the effect of fiber as a mechanical influence on [...] Read more.
The oral cavity houses a diverse consortium of microorganisms, heavily influenced by host diet, that can mediate dental health and disease. While the impact of dietary carbohydrates to the dental microbiome has been well-documented, the effect of fiber as a mechanical influence on the dental microbiome is unexplored. We performed 16S rRNA gene analysis to investigate the response of the dental microbiome to the presence of increased fiber in terms of microbial taxonomic abundance and diversity. Dental microbial community structure was significantly different in mice fed a diet supplemented with increased fiber and/or sugar. Fiber significantly affected measures of beta diversity at the phylum and genus levels, and a strong interactive effect on alpha diversity was observed between sugar and fiber at the phylum level. The addition of fiber also induced significant variation in relative taxonomic abundance. This study demonstrates that fiber can promote significant variations in the mouse dental microbiome. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health to Global Health: Impact of Nutrition)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Collagen Cross-Link Deficiency on Incorporation of Grafted Bone
Dent. J. 2019, 7(2), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7020045
Received: 22 February 2019 / Revised: 10 April 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 1 May 2019
PDF Full-text (5659 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bone matrix collagen, is one of the major contributors to bone quality. No studies have examined how bone quality affects the results of bone transplantation. Collagen cross-links (CCL) are the key factor in collagen properties. The purpose was to investigate the influences of [...] Read more.
Bone matrix collagen, is one of the major contributors to bone quality. No studies have examined how bone quality affects the results of bone transplantation. Collagen cross-links (CCL) are the key factor in collagen properties. The purpose was to investigate the influences of CCL for both grafted bone and recipient site bone on the success of bone augmentation. Four-week-old male Wister rats (n = 54) were divided into control and test groups. Control and test groups equally sub-divided into donors and recipients. An additional six rats were used to characterize bone at day zero. Test groups received 0.2% beta-aminoproperionitrile (BAPN) for 4 weeks as CCL inhibitor. Animals were further divided into donor and recipient groups. The transplanted bone chips integrated with host bone by 25% more in CCL-deficient animals compared to control. However, no difference in cortical thickness among all conditions. CCL-deficient transplanted bone did not show any extra signs of osteocyte apoptosis, while sclerostin expression was comparable to that in control. The host periosteum of CCL-deficient animals showed higher cellular activity, as well as higher bone quantity and osteoclast activity. Collagen cross-links deficiency in host bone might accelerate the incorporation of grafted bone. effect. Incorporation of the bone grafts appears to depend mainly on host condition rather than graft condition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health to Global Health: Impact of Nutrition)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessReview
Dental Infection and Resistance—Global Health Consequences
Dent. J. 2019, 7(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7010022
Received: 4 December 2018 / Revised: 3 February 2019 / Accepted: 20 February 2019 / Published: 1 March 2019
PDF Full-text (290 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Antibiotics are widely used in dental caries and another dental related issues, both for therapeutic and prophylactic reasons. Unfortunately, in recent years the use of antibiotics has been accompanied by the rapid emergence antimicrobial resistance. Dental caries and periodontal diseases are historically known [...] Read more.
Antibiotics are widely used in dental caries and another dental related issues, both for therapeutic and prophylactic reasons. Unfortunately, in recent years the use of antibiotics has been accompanied by the rapid emergence antimicrobial resistance. Dental caries and periodontal diseases are historically known as the top oral health burden in both developing and developed nations affecting around 20–50% of the population of this planet and the uppermost reason for tooth loss. Dental surgeons and family practitioners frequently prescribed antimicrobials for their patients as outpatient care. Several studies reported that antibiotics are often irrationally- and overprescribed in dental diseases which is the basis of antimicrobial resistance. The aim of this review is to evaluate the use of antibiotics in dental diseases. Almost certainly the promotion of primary oral health care (POHC) in primary health care program especially among the least and middle-income countries (LMIC) may be the answer to ensure and promote rational dental care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health to Global Health: Impact of Nutrition)

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessPerspective
Dysregulated Phosphate Metabolism, Periodontal Disease, and Cancer: Possible Global Health Implications
Dent. J. 2019, 7(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7010018
Received: 31 December 2018 / Revised: 31 January 2019 / Accepted: 6 February 2019 / Published: 11 February 2019
PDF Full-text (573 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An association between periodontal disease and cancer has been established in recent studies, but no common etiology has been identified in the hopes of reducing the global burden of these non-communicable diseases. This perspective article hypothesizes that the determinant mediating the association of [...] Read more.
An association between periodontal disease and cancer has been established in recent studies, but no common etiology has been identified in the hopes of reducing the global burden of these non-communicable diseases. This perspective article hypothesizes that the determinant mediating the association of periodontal disease with cancer is dysregulated phosphate metabolism. Phosphate, an essential dietary micronutrient, is dysregulated in chronic kidney disease, and both cancer and periodontal disease are associated with chronic kidney disease. Reviewed evidence includes the association between phosphate toxicity and cancer development, and the association between periodontal disease and chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder includes conditions such as ectopic calcification and bone resorption, which may be indirectly related to periodontal disease. Dental calculus in periodontal disease contains calcium phosphate crystals that are deposited from excess calcium and phosphate in saliva. Alveolar bone resorption may be linked systemically to release of parathyroid hormone in response to hypocalcemia induced by hyperphosphatemia. More research is needed to examine the role of dysregulated phosphate metabolism in periodontal disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health to Global Health: Impact of Nutrition)
Figures

Figure 1

Dent. J. EISSN 2304-6767 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top