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Dental Infection and Resistance—Global Health Consequences

1
Unit of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia (National Defence University of Malaysia), Kem Sungai Besi, 57000 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2
Department of Surgery, Macerata Hospital, via Santa Lucia 2, 62100 Macerata, Italy
3
Ninewells Hospital & Medical School, Dundee DD1 9SY, Scotland, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Dent. J. 2019, 7(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7010022
Received: 4 December 2018 / Revised: 3 February 2019 / Accepted: 20 February 2019 / Published: 1 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health to Global Health: Impact of Nutrition)
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PDF [290 KB, uploaded 1 March 2019]

Abstract

Antibiotics are widely used in dental caries and another dental related issues, both for therapeutic and prophylactic reasons. Unfortunately, in recent years the use of antibiotics has been accompanied by the rapid emergence antimicrobial resistance. Dental caries and periodontal diseases are historically known as the top oral health burden in both developing and developed nations affecting around 20–50% of the population of this planet and the uppermost reason for tooth loss. Dental surgeons and family practitioners frequently prescribed antimicrobials for their patients as outpatient care. Several studies reported that antibiotics are often irrationally- and overprescribed in dental diseases which is the basis of antimicrobial resistance. The aim of this review is to evaluate the use of antibiotics in dental diseases. Almost certainly the promotion of primary oral health care (POHC) in primary health care program especially among the least and middle-income countries (LMIC) may be the answer to ensure and promote rational dental care. View Full-Text
Keywords: dental; oral; maxillofacial; infection; antibiotic; antimicrobial; resistance pattern; epidemiology; common microorganism; nutrition component; biofilm formation; morbidity; mortality; increase healthcare cost dental; oral; maxillofacial; infection; antibiotic; antimicrobial; resistance pattern; epidemiology; common microorganism; nutrition component; biofilm formation; morbidity; mortality; increase healthcare cost
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Haque, M.; Sartelli, M.; Haque, S.Z. Dental Infection and Resistance—Global Health Consequences. Dent. J. 2019, 7, 22.

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