Special Issue "Mineralogical Crystallography"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystal Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Vladislav V. Gurzhiy
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department Crystallography, Institute of Earth Sciences, Saint Petersburg State University
Interests: Crystallography; Mineralogy; X-ray diffraction; Crystal growth; Uranium; Actinides; Biomineralogy; Organic minerals; Inorganic chemistry; Coordination chemistry; Radiochemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Crystallography remains for mineralogy one of the main sources of information about natural crystalline substances. A description of mineral species shape is carried out according to the principles of geometric crystallography; the crystal structure of minerals is determined using X-ray crystallography techniques, and physical crystallography approaches allow one to evaluate various properties of minerals, etc. However, the reverse comparison should not be forgotten as well: the crystallography science, in its current form, was born in the course of mineralogical research, long before preparative chemistry received such extensive development. It is worth saying that, even today, investigations of crystallographic characteristics of minerals regularly open up new horizons in materials science, because the possibilities of nature (fascinating chemical diversity; great variation of thermodynamic parameters; and, of course, almost endless processing time) are still not available for reproduction in any of the world's laboratories. This Special Issue is devoted to mineralogical crystallography, the oldest branch of crystallographic science, and aims to combine important surveys covering topics indicated in the keywords below.

We invite you to participate in this Issue and to contribute your research results in the fields of new mineral species discovery, structural studies of minerals and related synthetic materials, crystal chemical overviews of various mineral groups, the evolution of mineral species and their crystal structures, and descriptions of growth processes and the properties of the natural crystalline compounds.

Best regards,
Dr. Vladislav V. Gurzhiy
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Minerals
  • Crystallography
  • Crystal chemistry
  • X-ray diffraction
  • Crystal structures
  • Crystal growth
  • Mineral evolution

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Bacterial Effect on the Crystallization of Mineral Phases in a Solution Simulating Human Urine
Crystals 2019, 9(5), 259; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9050259 - 18 May 2019
Abstract
The effect of bacteria that present in the human urine (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus) was studied under the conditions of biomimetic synthesis. It was shown that the addition of bacteria significantly affects both the phase composition [...] Read more.
The effect of bacteria that present in the human urine (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus) was studied under the conditions of biomimetic synthesis. It was shown that the addition of bacteria significantly affects both the phase composition of the synthesized material and the position of crystallization boundaries of the resulting phosphate phases, which can shift toward more acidic (struvite, apatite) or toward more alkaline (brushite) conditions. Under conditions of oxalate mineralization, bacteria accelerate the nucleation of calcium oxalates by almost two times and also increase the amount of oxalate precipitates along with phosphates and stabilize the calcium oxalate dihydrate (weddellite). The multidirectional changes in the pH values of the solutions, which are the result of the interaction of all system components and the crystallization process, were analyzed. The obtained results are the scientific basis for understanding the mechanisms of bacterial involvement in stone formation within the human body and the creation of biotechnological methods that inhibit this process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineralogical Crystallography)
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Open AccessArticle
The High Pressure Behavior of Galenobismutite, PbBi2S4: A Synchrotron Single Crystal X-ray Diffraction Study
Crystals 2019, 9(4), 210; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9040210 - 18 Apr 2019
Abstract
High-pressure single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data for galenobismutite, PbBi2S4 collected up to 20.9 GPa, were fitted by a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, as suggested by a FE-fE plot, yielding V0 = 697.4(8) Å3 [...] Read more.
High-pressure single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data for galenobismutite, PbBi2S4 collected up to 20.9 GPa, were fitted by a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, as suggested by a FE-fE plot, yielding V0 = 697.4(8) Å3, K0 = 51(1) GPa and K’ = 5.0(2). The axial moduli were M0a = 115(7) GPa and Ma’ = 28(2) for the a axis, M0b = 162(3) GPa and Mb’ = 8(3) for the b axis, M0c = 142(8) GPa and Mc’ = 26(2) for the c axis, with refined values of a0, b0, c0 equal to 11.791(7) Å, 14.540(6) Å 4.076(3) Å, respectively, and a ratio equal to M0a:M0b:M0c = 1.55:1:1.79. The main structural changes on compression were the M2 and M3 (occupied by Bi, Pb) movements toward the centers of their respective trigonal prism bodies and M3 changes towards CN8. The M1 site, occupied solely by Bi, regularizes the octahedral form with CN6. The eccentricities of all cation sites decreased with compression testifying for a decrease in stereochemical expression of lone electron pairs. Galenobismutite is isostructural with calcium ferrite CaFe2O4, the suggested high pressure structure can host Na and Al in the lower mantle. The study indicates that pressure enables the incorporation of other elements in this structure, increasing its potential significance for mantle mineralogy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineralogical Crystallography)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Synthesis Methods and Favorable Conditions for Spherical Vaterite Precipitation: A Review
Crystals 2019, 9(4), 223; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9040223 - 25 Apr 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Vaterite is the least thermodynamically stable anhydrous calcium carbonate polymorph. Its existence is very rare in nature, e.g., in some rock formations or as a component of biominerals produced by some fishes, crustaceans, or birds. Synthetic vaterite particles are proposed as carriers of [...] Read more.
Vaterite is the least thermodynamically stable anhydrous calcium carbonate polymorph. Its existence is very rare in nature, e.g., in some rock formations or as a component of biominerals produced by some fishes, crustaceans, or birds. Synthetic vaterite particles are proposed as carriers of active substances in medicines, additives in cosmetic preparations as well as adsorbents. Also, their utilization as a pump for microfluidic flow is also tested. In particular, vaterite particles produced as polycrystalline spheres have large potential for application. Various methods are proposed to precipitate vaterite particles, including the conventional solution-solution synthesis, gas-liquid method as well as special routes. Precipitation conditions should be carefully selected to obtain a high concentration of vaterite in all these methods. In this review, classical and new methods used for vaterite precipitation are presented. Furthermore, the key parameters affecting the formation of spherical vaterite are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineralogical Crystallography)
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