Special Issue "Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Proceedings of the INFN-LNF 2018 Conference"

A special issue of Condensed Matter (ISSN 2410-3896).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Stefano Bellucci

INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: carbon nanotube; materials science & nanotechnology; multifunctional materials; nano carbon; biomedical applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The NEXT Nanotechnology group at INFN—Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) has since 2000 organized a series of international meetings in the area of nanotechnology. The 2018 conference is devoted to recent developments in nanoscience and their manifold technological applications. These consist of a number of tutorial/keynote lectures, as well as research talks presenting frontier nanoscience research developments and innovative nanotechnologies in the areas of biology, medicine, aerospace, optoelectronics, energy, materials and characterizations, low-dimensional nanostructures and devices. We plan to submit selected papers based on conference talks and related discussions for publication in a dedicated issue entitled “Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Letters. Invited Lectures and selected talks from the 2018 Conference”. Papers will be published after careful refereeing process. A second issue will handle contributions on similar topics not presented at the conference.

Dr. Stefano Bellucci
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Nanotechnological applications of manoscience for the applicative areas of biology
  • medicine
  • aerospace
  • optoelectronics
  • energy
  • materials and characterizations
  • low-dimensional nanostructures and devices

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Electronic Structure of Boron Flat Holeless Sheet
Condens. Matter 2019, 4(1), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat4010028
Received: 30 January 2019 / Revised: 20 February 2019 / Accepted: 26 February 2019 / Published: 3 March 2019
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Abstract
The electronic band structure, namely energy band surfaces and densities-of-states (DoS), of a hypothetical flat and ideally perfect, i.e., without any type of holes, boron sheet with a triangular network is calculated within a quasi-classical approach. It is shown to have metallic properties [...] Read more.
The electronic band structure, namely energy band surfaces and densities-of-states (DoS), of a hypothetical flat and ideally perfect, i.e., without any type of holes, boron sheet with a triangular network is calculated within a quasi-classical approach. It is shown to have metallic properties as is expected for most of the possible structural modifications of boron sheets. The Fermi curve of the boron flat sheet is found to be consisted of 6 parts of 3 closed curves, which can be approximated by ellipses representing the quadric energy-dispersion of the conduction electrons. The effective mass of electrons at the Fermi level in a boron flat sheet is found to be too small compared with the free electron mass m 0 and to be highly anisotropic. Its values distinctly differ in directions Γ–K and Γ–M: m Γ K / m 0 0.480 and m Γ M / m 0 0.052 , respectively. The low effective mass of conduction electrons, m σ / m 0 0.094 , indicates their high mobility and, hence, high conductivity of the boron sheet. The effects of buckling/puckering and the presence of hexagonal or other type of holes expected in real boron sheets can be considered as perturbations of the obtained electronic structure and theoretically taken into account as effects of higher order. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Model of Nano-Metal Electroplating Process in Trapezoid Profile Groove
Condens. Matter 2019, 4(1), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat4010026
Received: 26 December 2018 / Revised: 11 February 2019 / Accepted: 19 February 2019 / Published: 21 February 2019
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Abstract
The principle of the electrodeposition method is to immerse the coated products in a water electrolyte solution, the main components of which are salts or other soluble compounds—metal coatings. The software COMSOL Multiphysics was allowed to perform a simulation of the processes of [...] Read more.
The principle of the electrodeposition method is to immerse the coated products in a water electrolyte solution, the main components of which are salts or other soluble compounds—metal coatings. The software COMSOL Multiphysics was allowed to perform a simulation of the processes of electrodeposition of the metals copper and silver in the groove of the trapezoidal profile. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Temperature Effects on the HOPG Intercalation Process
Condens. Matter 2019, 4(1), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat4010023
Received: 15 December 2018 / Revised: 4 February 2019 / Accepted: 10 February 2019 / Published: 14 February 2019
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Abstract
Graphite intercalation via chemical strategies is a common procedure to delaminate stratified crystals and obtain a suspension of graphene flakes. The intercalation mechanism at the molecular level is still under investigation in view of enhancing graphene production and reducing damage to the original [...] Read more.
Graphite intercalation via chemical strategies is a common procedure to delaminate stratified crystals and obtain a suspension of graphene flakes. The intercalation mechanism at the molecular level is still under investigation in view of enhancing graphene production and reducing damage to the original pristine crystal. The latter, in particular, can undergo surface detriment due to both blister evolution and carbon dissolution. The role of the electrolyte temperature in this process has never been investigated. Here, by using an in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) apparatus, we explore surface morphology changes after the application of fast cyclic-voltammetries at 343 K, in view of de-coupling the crystal swelling phenomenon from the other electrochemical processes. We find that blisters do not evolve as a consequence of the increasing temperature, while the quality of the graphite surface becomes significantly worse, due to the formation of some adsorbates on possible defect sites of the electrode surface. Our results suggest that the chemical baths used in graphite delamination must be carefully monitored in temperature for avoiding undesired electrode detriment. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Effect of High-Temperature Annealing on Graphene with Nickel Contacts
Condens. Matter 2019, 4(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat4010021
Received: 9 January 2019 / Revised: 1 February 2019 / Accepted: 1 February 2019 / Published: 6 February 2019
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Abstract
Graphene has shown great potential for ultra-high frequency electronics. However, using graphene in electronic devices creates a requirement for electrodes with low contact resistance. Thermal annealing is sometimes used to improve the performance of contact electrodes. However, high-temperature annealing may introduce additional doping [...] Read more.
Graphene has shown great potential for ultra-high frequency electronics. However, using graphene in electronic devices creates a requirement for electrodes with low contact resistance. Thermal annealing is sometimes used to improve the performance of contact electrodes. However, high-temperature annealing may introduce additional doping or defects to graphene. Moreover, an extensive increase in temperature may damage electrodes by destroying the metal–graphene contact. In this work, we studied the effect of high-temperature annealing on graphene and nickel–graphene contacts. Annealing was done in the temperature range of 200–800 °C and the effect of the annealing temperature was observed by two and four-point probe resistance measurements and by Raman spectroscopy. We observed that the annealing of a graphene sample above 300 °C increased the level of doping, but did not always improve electrical contacts. Above 600 °C, the nickel–graphene contact started to degrade, while graphene survived even higher process temperatures. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Fluctuation Theory in Chemical Kinetics
Condens. Matter 2018, 3(4), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat3040049
Received: 12 November 2018 / Revised: 11 December 2018 / Accepted: 12 December 2018 / Published: 17 December 2018
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Abstract
In this research, we study the stability properties of chemical reactions of arbitrary orders. In a given chemical experiment, we focus on the formation of a chemical equilibrium by optimizing the reaction rate. Under infinitesimal simultaneous variations of the concentrations of reacting species, [...] Read more.
In this research, we study the stability properties of chemical reactions of arbitrary orders. In a given chemical experiment, we focus on the formation of a chemical equilibrium by optimizing the reaction rate. Under infinitesimal simultaneous variations of the concentrations of reacting species, the binary component equilibrium is achieved when either one of the orders or concentrations of reactants vanishes. The chemical concentration capacities of the components are calculated to describe the local stability of the equilibrium. The correlation between the components is obtained as the mixed second-order derivative of the rate with respect to concentrations. The global stability analysis is performed by introducing a symmetric matrix with its diagonal components as the chemical capacities and off-diagonal components as the local correlation. We find that the local chemical stability requires the orders of the reactants to be either negative or larger than unity. The corresponding global stability requires the positivity of a cubic factor over the orders of the reactants. In short, our consideration illustrates how a chemical reaction takes place by attaining its activation state and asymptotically approaches the equilibrium when two components are mixed with arbitrary orders. Qualitative discussions are provided to support our analysis towards the formation of an optimized equilibrium. Finally, along with future directions, we discuss verification of our model towards the formation of carbon-based reactions, formation of organic/inorganic chemical equilibria and catalytic oxidation of C O H 2 mixtures in presence of Pt. Full article
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Open AccessBrief Report Simulation of the Process of Obtaining Nanoparticles by Thermal Decomposition
Condens. Matter 2019, 4(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat4010019
Received: 26 December 2018 / Revised: 21 January 2019 / Accepted: 26 January 2019 / Published: 29 January 2019
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Abstract
In this work, the possibility of modeling the process of thermal decomposition in the COMSOL Multiphysics program for the preparation of nanoparticles of metals and their alloys was determined. To identify the most suitable pyrolysis medium, two environments are presented: a water solution [...] Read more.
In this work, the possibility of modeling the process of thermal decomposition in the COMSOL Multiphysics program for the preparation of nanoparticles of metals and their alloys was determined. To identify the most suitable pyrolysis medium, two environments are presented: a water solution and ethanol. Full article
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