Special Issue "Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Proceedings of the INFN-LNF 2019 Conference"

A special issue of Condensed Matter (ISSN 2410-3896).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Stefano Bellucci
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Guest Editor
INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati, Italy
Interests: carbon nanotube; materials science & nanotechnology; multifunctional materials; nanocarbon; biomedical applications
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The NEXT Nanotechnology group at INFN­–Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) has, since the year 2000, organized a series of yearly international meetings in the area of nanoscience and technology. The 2019 conference is devoted to recent developments in nanoscience and their manifold technological applications. These consist of a number of tutorial/keynote lectures, as well as research talks presenting frontier nanoscience research developments and innovative nanotechnologies in the areas of biology, medicine, aerospace, optoelectronics, energy, materials and characterizations, low-dimensional nanostructures and devices. We will invite all speakers to submit selected papers based on conference talks and related discussions for publication in a dedicated issue of MDPI’s Condensed Matter entitled "Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: Proceedings of the INFN-LNF 2019 Conference". Papers will be published after a careful refereeing process.

Prof. Dr. Stefano Bellucci
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Condensed Matter is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanotechnological applications of manoscience for the applicative areas of biology
  • medicine
  • aerospace
  • optoelectronics
  • energy
  • materials and characterizations
  • low-dimensional nanostructures and devices

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Superfluid Properties of Superconductors with Disorder at the Nanoscale: A Random Impedance Model
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5020036 - 14 May 2020
Abstract
Some two-dimensional superconductors like, e.g., LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures or thin films of transition metal dichalcogenides, display peculiar properties that can be understood in terms of electron inhomogeneity at the nanoscale. In this framework, unusual features of the metal-superconductor transition have been [...] Read more.
Some two-dimensional superconductors like, e.g., LaAlO 3 /SrTiO 3 heterostructures or thin films of transition metal dichalcogenides, display peculiar properties that can be understood in terms of electron inhomogeneity at the nanoscale. In this framework, unusual features of the metal-superconductor transition have been interpreted as due to percolative effects within a network of superconducting regions embedded in a metallic matrix. In this work we use a mean-field-like effective medium approach to investigate the superconducting phase below the critical temperature T c at which the resistivity vanishes. Specifically, we consider the finite frequency impedance of the system to extract the dissipative part of the conductance and the superfluid stiffness in the superconducting state. Intriguing effects arise from the metallic character of the embedding matrix: upon decreasing the temperature below T c proximity effects may rapidly increase the superfluid stiffness. Then, a rather fragile superconducting state, living on a filamentary network just below T c , can be substantially consolidated by additional superconducting regions induced by proximity effect in the interstitial metallic regions. This mean-field prediction should call for further theoretical analyses and trigger experimental investigations of the superconducting properties of the above systems. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Nanostructured TiC Layer is Highly Suitable Surface for Adhesion, Proliferation and Spreading of Cells
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(2), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5020029 - 10 Apr 2020
Abstract
Cell culture is usually performed in 2D polymer surfaces; however, several studies are conducted with the aim to screen functional coating molecules to find substrates more suitable for cell adhesion and proliferation. The aim of this manuscript is to compare the cell adhesion [...] Read more.
Cell culture is usually performed in 2D polymer surfaces; however, several studies are conducted with the aim to screen functional coating molecules to find substrates more suitable for cell adhesion and proliferation. The aim of this manuscript is to compare the cell adhesion and cytoskeleton organization of different cell types on different surfaces. Human primary fibroblasts, chondrocytes and osteoblasts isolated from patients undergoing surgery were seeded on polystyrene, poly-d-lysine-coated glass and titanium carbide slides and left to grow for several days. Then their cytoskeleton was analyzed, both by staining cells with phalloidin, which highlights actin fibers, and using Atomic Force Microscopy. We also monitored the production of Fibroblast Growth Factor-2, Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 and Osteocalcin, using ELISA, and we highlighted production of Collagen type I in fibroblasts and osteoblasts and Collagen type II in chondrocytes by immunofluorescences. Fibroblasts, chondrocytes and osteoblasts showed both an improved proliferative activity and a good adhesion ability when cultured on titanium carbide slides, compared to polystyrene and poly-d-lysine-coated glass. In conclusion, we propose titanium carbide as a suitable surface to cultivate cells such as fibroblasts, chondrocytes and osteoblasts, allowing the preservation of their differentiated state and good adhesion properties. Full article
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