Special Issue "Surface Functionalization of Biomaterials: Combining Cell Instructive and Antibacterial Properties on Medical Implants"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactive Coatings and Biointerfaces".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Carlos Mas-Moruno
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: peptides; peptidomimetics; surface functionalization; multifunctional coatings; biomaterials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to contribute with original innovative research works to this Special Issue on “Surface Functionalization of Biomaterials: Combining Cell Instructive and Antibacterial Properties on Medical Implants”. Insufficient implant integration with surrounding tissues and bacterial infection are recognized as two of the major causes of biomaterials failure in clinical settings. To improve the long-term success of medical implants, recent strategies of surface functionalization are trying to simultaneously enhance host eukaryotic cell functions while inhibiting bacterial colonization. Such an integrated, multifunctional approach introduces clear advantages in comparison to classical methods of surface modification, which rarely explored a combined goal. The aim of this Special Issue is to present the latest progress and advances in the development of cell instructive and antibacterial biomaterials, through a combination of original research papers and review articles from leading groups around the world.

In particular, the topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • New methods and strategies of surface functionalization;
  • Synthesis and development of multifunctional coatings;
  • Metal, ceramic, and polymer-based biomaterials with dual potential;
  • Nanostructured biomaterials with dual potential;
  • Smart, stimuli-responsive, and drug-releasing biomaterials.

Dr. Carlos Mas-Moruno
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Surface Immobilization Chemistry of a Laminin-Derived Peptide Affects Keratinocyte Activity
Coatings 2020, 10(6), 560; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10060560 - 11 Jun 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1006
Abstract
Many chemical routes have been proposed to immobilize peptides on biomedical device surfaces, and in particular, on dental implants to prevent peri-implantitis. While a number of factors affect peptide immobilization quality, an easily controllable factor is the chemistry used to immobilize peptides. These [...] Read more.
Many chemical routes have been proposed to immobilize peptides on biomedical device surfaces, and in particular, on dental implants to prevent peri-implantitis. While a number of factors affect peptide immobilization quality, an easily controllable factor is the chemistry used to immobilize peptides. These factors affect peptide chemoselectivity, orientation, etc., and ultimately control biological activity. Using many different physical and chemical routes for peptide coatings, previous research has intensely focused on immobilizing antimicrobial elements on dental implants to reduce infection rates. Alternatively, our strategy here is different and focused on promoting formation of a long-lasting biological seal between the soft tissue and the implant surface through transmembrane, cell adhesion structures called hemidesmosomes. For that purpose, we used a laminin-derived call adhesion peptide. However, the effect of different immobilization chemistries on cell adhesion peptide activity is vastly unexplored but likely critical. Here, we compared the physiochemical properties and biological responses of a hemidesmosome promoting peptide immobilized using silanization and copper-free click chemistry as a model system for cell adhesion peptides. Successful immobilization was confirmed with water contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Peptide coatings were retained through 73 days of incubation in artificial saliva. Interestingly, the non-chemoselective immobilization route, silanization, resulted in significantly higher proliferation and hemidesmosome formation in oral keratinocytes compared to chemoselective click chemistry. Our results highlight that the most effective immobilization chemistry for optimal peptide activity is dependent on the specific system (substrate/peptide/cell/biological activity) under study. Overall, a better understanding of the effects immobilization chemistries have on cell adhesion peptide activity may lead to more efficacious coatings for biomedical devices. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Polyethylene Glycol Pulsed Electrodeposition for the Development of Antifouling Coatings on Titanium
Coatings 2020, 10(5), 456; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10050456 - 08 May 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1201
Abstract
Titanium dental implants are widely used for the replacement of damaged teeth. However, bacterial infections at the interface between soft tissues and the implant can impair the functionality of the device and lead to failure. In this work, the preparation of an antifouling [...] Read more.
Titanium dental implants are widely used for the replacement of damaged teeth. However, bacterial infections at the interface between soft tissues and the implant can impair the functionality of the device and lead to failure. In this work, the preparation of an antifouling coating of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on titanium by pulsed electrodeposition was investigated in order to reduce Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) adhesion while maintaining human fibroblast adhesion. Different pulsed conditions were prepared and characterized by contact angle, Focused Ion Beam (FIB), Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy in the Attenuated Total Reflectance mode (ATR-FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS tested fibronectin adsorption. S. aureus, E. coli and human fibroblast adhesion was tested in vitro in both mono and co-culture settings. Physicochemical characterization proved useful for confirming the presence of PEG and evaluating the efficiency of the coating methods. Fibronectin adsorption decreased for all of the conditions, but an adsorption of 20% when compared to titanium was maintained, which supported fibroblast adhesion on the surfaces. In contrast, S. aureus and E. coli attachment on coated surfaces decreased up to 90% vs. control titanium. Co-culture studies with the two bacterial strains and human fibroblasts showed the efficacy of the coatings to allow for eukaryotic cell adhesion, even in the presence of pre-adhered bacteria. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Protruding Nanostructured Surfaces for Antimicrobial and Osteogenic Titanium Implants
Coatings 2020, 10(8), 756; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10080756 - 03 Aug 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1142
Abstract
Protruding nanostructured surfaces have gained increasing interest due to their unique wetting behaviours and more recently their antimicrobial and osteogenic properties. Rapid development in nanofabrication techniques that offer high throughput and versatility on titanium substrate open up the possibility for better orthopaedic and [...] Read more.
Protruding nanostructured surfaces have gained increasing interest due to their unique wetting behaviours and more recently their antimicrobial and osteogenic properties. Rapid development in nanofabrication techniques that offer high throughput and versatility on titanium substrate open up the possibility for better orthopaedic and dental implants that deter bacterial colonisation while promoting osteointegration. In this review we present a brief overview of current problems associated with bacterial infection of titanium implants and of efforts to fabricate titanium implants that have both bactericidal and osteogenic properties. All of the proposed mechano-bactericidal mechanisms of protruding nanostructured surfaces are then considered so as to explore the potential advantages and disadvantages of adopting such novel technologies for use in future implant applications. Different nanofabrication methods that can be utilised to fabricate such nanostructured surfaces on titanium substrate are briefly discussed. Full article
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