Special Issue "Impact of Climate-Change on Water Resources"

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Christina Anagnostopoulou

Department of Meteorology – Climatology, School of Geology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, University Campus, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Global and Regional Climate modeling; Dynamical and Statistical Downscaling models; extremes; synopric and Dynamic climatology
Guest Editor
Dr. Charalampos Skoulikaris

UNESCO Chair INWEB, Department of Civil Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Interests: water resources management; hydroinformatics; climate change impact on water resources; hydrology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water is located at the core of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN-SDGs) of the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development. Apart from Goal 6 “Clean Water and Sanitation”, other proposed goals also include different water targets for achieving the majority of the SDGs.

At the same time, management and allocation of water resources is not a forthright procedure. Water users and stakeholders claim these resources for coverage of their own demands, such as domestic and industrial supply, irrigated agriculture, hydropower production and ecosystems preservation. In cases of transboundary water resources, differentiations in national strategies, development priorities, and economic status among countries that share these resources induce more complexity in the management of water. Moreover, this complication may be further affected due to the demographic and climatic change drivers that increase the stress on water resources.

According to IPCC, climate change is expected to have dramatic effects on water resources. Climate model simulations for the 21st century are consistent in projecting temperature increases that will result in water temperature increase, rising sea levels and changes in coastal and oceans regions. Higher water temperatures and changes in extremes, including floods and droughts, are projected to affect water quality and exacerbate many forms of water pollution. To better understand the mechanisms of climate variability and climate change on water resources, it is crucial to have multidisciplinary studies that involve climatology and hydrology.

This Special Issue aims to contribute to the understanding hydrological processes and efficient water management strategies in changing climate. Moreover, it will consist of papers that integrate different scales, from catchment, to region, and to globe.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Understanding and modelling changing climate relating to the hydrological cycle
  • Climate extremes and impacts on water resources
  • water availability in a changing climate
  • Climate change and impacts on water supply
  • climate change mitigation measures
  • Adaptation strategies for water resources in a changing environment

Dr. Christina Anagnostopoulou
Dr. Charalampos Skoulikaris
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Climate is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water resources management
  • climate change
  • extremes
  • drought
  • floods
  • water stress
  • water quality
  • water availability

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication Climate Change and Extreme Weather Drive the Declines of Saline Lakes: A Showcase of the Great Salt Lake
Climate 2019, 7(2), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli7020019
Received: 5 December 2018 / Revised: 16 January 2019 / Accepted: 22 January 2019 / Published: 23 January 2019
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Abstract
A viewpoint of a temporal trend with an extremely changing point analysis is proposed to analyze and characterize the so-called current declines of the world’s saline lakes. A temporal trend of a hydrological or climate variable is statistically tested by regressing it against [...] Read more.
A viewpoint of a temporal trend with an extremely changing point analysis is proposed to analyze and characterize the so-called current declines of the world’s saline lakes. A temporal trend of a hydrological or climate variable is statistically tested by regressing it against time; if the regression is statistically significant, an ascending or declining trend exists. The extremely changing points can be found out by using the mean of a variable, adding or subtracting two times of its standard deviation (SD) for extremely high values and extremely low values, respectively. Applying the temporal trend method to the Great Salt Lake’s (GSL) relationship between its surface levels and precipitation/temperature in the last century, we conclude that climate changes, especially local warming and extreme weather including both precipitation and temperature, drive the dynamics (increases and declines) of the GSL surface levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Climate-Change on Water Resources)
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Open AccessArticle Temporal Changes in Precipitation and Temperature and their Implications on the Streamflow of Rosi River, Central Nepal
Climate 2019, 7(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli7010003
Received: 23 October 2018 / Revised: 19 December 2018 / Accepted: 21 December 2018 / Published: 28 December 2018
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Abstract
Nepal has experienced recent changes in two crucial climatic variables: temperature and precipitation. Therefore, climate-induced water security concerns have now become more pronounced in Nepal as changes in temperature and precipitation have already altered some hydrological processes such as the river runoff in [...] Read more.
Nepal has experienced recent changes in two crucial climatic variables: temperature and precipitation. Therefore, climate-induced water security concerns have now become more pronounced in Nepal as changes in temperature and precipitation have already altered some hydrological processes such as the river runoff in some river systems. However, the linkage between precipitation patterns and streamflow characteristics are poorly understood, especially in small rivers. We analysed the temporal trends of temperature, precipitation, and extreme indices of wet and dry spells in the Rosi watershed in Central Nepal, and observed the temporal patterns of the streamflow of the Rosi river. We also examined the linkages between the average and extreme climate indices and streamflow. We found that the area has warmed up by an average of 0.03 °C/year, and has seen a significant decline in precipitation. The dry spell as represented by the maximum length of the dry spell (CDD) and the magnitude of dryness (AII) has become more pronounced, while the wet spell as represented by the number of heavy rainfall days (R5D) and the precipitation intensity on wet days (SDII) has diminished significantly. Our analysis shows that recent changes in precipitation patterns have affected the streamflow of the Rosi river, as manifested in the observed decline in annual and seasonal streamflows. The decrease in the availability of water in the river is likely to have severe consequences for water security in the area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Climate-Change on Water Resources)
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Open AccessArticle Evaluation of Gridded Multi-Satellite Precipitation Estimation (TRMM-3B42-V7) Performance in the Upper Indus Basin (UIB)
Climate 2018, 6(3), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli6030076
Received: 18 August 2018 / Revised: 4 September 2018 / Accepted: 5 September 2018 / Published: 7 September 2018
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Abstract
The present study aims to evaluate the capability of the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM), Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), version 7 (TRMM-3B42-V7) precipitation product to estimate appropriate precipitation rates in the Upper Indus Basin (UIB) by analyzing the dependency of the estimates’ accuracies [...] Read more.
The present study aims to evaluate the capability of the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM), Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), version 7 (TRMM-3B42-V7) precipitation product to estimate appropriate precipitation rates in the Upper Indus Basin (UIB) by analyzing the dependency of the estimates’ accuracies on the time scale. To that avail, various statistical analyses and comparison of Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) products with gauge measurements in the UIB are carried out. The dependency of the TMPA estimates’ quality on the aggregation time scale is analyzed by comparisons of daily, monthly, seasonal and annual sums for the UIB. The results show considerable biases in the TMPA Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) precipitation estimates for the UIB, as well as high numbers of false alarms and miss ratios. The correlation of the TMPA estimates with ground-based gauge data increases considerably and almost in a linear fashion with increasing temporal aggregation, i.e., time scale. There is a predominant trend of underestimation of the TRMM product across the UIB at most of the gauge stations, i.e., TRMM-estimated rainfall is generally lower than the gauge-measured rainfall. For the seasonal aggregates, the bias is mostly positive for the summer but predominantly negative for the winter season, thereby showing a slight overestimation of the precipitation in summer and underestimation in winter. The results of the study suggest that, in spite of these discrepancies between TMPA estimates and gauge data, the use of the former in hydrological watershed modeling undertaken by the authors may be a valuable alternative in data-scarce regions like the UIB, but still must be taken with a grain of salt. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Climate-Change on Water Resources)
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