Next Article in Journal
Atmospheric and Ocean Dynamics May Explain Cycles in Oceanic Oscillations
Next Article in Special Issue
Projected Changes in the Frequency of Peak Flows along the Athabasca River: Sensitivity of Results to Statistical Methods of Analysis
Previous Article in Journal
Integrating Urban Form, Function, and Energy Fluxes in a Heat Exposure Indicator in View of Intra-Urban Heat Island Assessment and Climate Change Adaptation
Previous Article in Special Issue
Climate Change Induced Salinization of Drinking Water Inlets along a Tidal Branch of the Rhine River: Impact Assessment and an Adaptive Strategy for Water Resources Management
Open AccessCase Report

Estimating the Future Function of the Nipsa Reservoir due to Climate Change and Debris Sediment Factors

1
Department of Civil Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, 67100 Xanthi, Greece
2
Deparment of Forestry and Management of the Environment and Natural Resources, Democritus University of Thrace, 68200 Orestiada, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Climate 2019, 7(6), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli7060076
Received: 19 March 2019 / Revised: 22 May 2019 / Accepted: 24 May 2019 / Published: 28 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Climate-Change on Water Resources)
The constantly growing human needs for water aiming to supply urban areas or for energy production or irrigation purposes enforces the application of practices leading to its saving. The construction of dams has been continuously increasing in recent years, aiming at the collection and storage of water in the formed reservoirs. The greatest challenge that reservoirs face during their lifetime is the sedimentation caused by debris and by the effects of climate change on water harvesting. The paper presents an investigation on the amount, the position and the height of the debris ending up at the Nipsa reservoir. The assessment of the debris volume produced in the drainage basin was conducted by a geographical information system (GIS) based model, named TopRunDF, also used to predict the sedimentation area and the sediment deposition height in the sedimentation cone. The impact of climate change to the reservoir storage capacity is evaluated with the use of a water balance model triggered by the HadCM2, ECHAM4, CSIRO-MK2, CGCM1, CCSR-98 climate change models. The results predict a significant future decrease in the stored water volume of the reservoir, and therefore several recommendations are proposed for the proper future functioning and operation of the reservoir. View Full-Text
Keywords: debris; water balance; climatic change; dam capacity; simulation of sediment transport debris; water balance; climatic change; dam capacity; simulation of sediment transport
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Maris, F.; Vasileiou, A.; Tsiamantas, P.; Angelidis, P. Estimating the Future Function of the Nipsa Reservoir due to Climate Change and Debris Sediment Factors. Climate 2019, 7, 76.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop