Special Issue "Modelling and Forecasting Extreme Climate Events"

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2022 | Viewed by 2629

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Christina Anagnostopoulou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Meteorology and Climatology, School of Geology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: climatology; climate change; extremes; climate hazards; statistical climatology; synoptic climatology-weather types; dynamic climatology–teleconnection patterns
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Georgia Lazoglou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Cyprus Institute, Climate and Atmosphere Research Center (CARE-C), 2121 Aglantzia, Cyprus
Interests: climatology; climate change; extremes; climate hazards; statistical climatology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the world’s climate changes, extreme events are becoming more frequent and intense. Nowadays, the current state-of-the-art climate models consist of fundamental tools for analyzing and predicting climate and weather extremes. The accuracy of climate models’ simulations is high for long-duration extremes (mainly monthly or seasonal scales). In contrast, there is great insufficiency due to uncertainty around high-resolution and short-timescale extreme events. Hence, understanding the mechanisms leading to the occurrence of climate and weather extremes will be the basis for assessing their predictability and enabling their prediction.

This Special Issue of Climate is devoted to promoting advances in understanding, modeling, and predicting climate extremes. Pertinent examples of topics for this Special Issue include types of extreme; the frequency, intensity and duration of climate extremes; observed and projected climate extremes; short- and medium-range forecasts of weather extremes; modeling impacts of weather and climate extremes; statistical aspects of extremes; case studies of extreme events; and sensitivity experiments for extremes prediction.

The Special Issue “Modelling and Forecasting Extreme Climate Events” is jointly organized between “Climate” and “Earth” journals. Contributors are required to check the website below and follow the specific instructions for authors:
https://www.mdpi.com/journal/climate/instructions
https://www.mdpi.com/journal/earth/instructions

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Earth, which will offer a lot of discounts or fully waivers for your papers based on peer-review results.

Dr. Christina Anagnostopoulou
Dr. Georgia Lazoglou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Climate is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • extreme weather
  • climate change
  • extreme climate indices
  • extreme temperature
  • extreme precipitation
  • storms
  • heatwaves
  • drought
  • floods
  • hurricanes
  • extreme value theory

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Observed Daily Temperature Variability and Extremes over Southeastern USA (1978–2017)
Climate 2021, 9(7), 110; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli9070110 - 01 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 871
Abstract
This study presents an analysis of extreme temperature events over southeastern USA from 1978 to 2017. This region is part of the so-called ‘warming hole’ where long-term surface temperature trends are negative or non-significant, in contrast with the remainder of the country. This [...] Read more.
This study presents an analysis of extreme temperature events over southeastern USA from 1978 to 2017. This region is part of the so-called ‘warming hole’ where long-term surface temperature trends are negative or non-significant, in contrast with the remainder of the country. This study examines whether this distinctive characteristic reflects on the region’s trends in temperature extremes. Daily maximum and minimum temperatures from the US Historical Climatology Network were used to compute extreme indices recommended by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices. Temperature extreme indices computed for all stations using the RClimDex package were gridded onto a regular latitude–longitude grid, and a spatiotemporal analysis of associated trends was performed. The results point to a tendency toward warming due to increasing trends in the annual occurrence of the hottest day, the warmest night, warm days, warm nights, summer days, tropical nights, and warm spells, as well as decreases in cool nights, cool days, and frost days. Statistically significant trend changes over large portions of the Southeast were dominated by increases in the frequency of the coldest night, summer days, and warm nights, and decreases in cool nights and frost days. Comparison of our results with other global and regional studies indicate that most of the extreme temperature changes over the Southeast are consistent with findings from other parts of the United States (US) and the world. Overall, this study shows that being part of the ‘warming hole’ does not preclude southeastern US from an intensification of temperature extremes, whether it is an increase in warm extremes or a decrease in cold ones. Further, the results suggest that, should the current trends continue in the long term, the Southeast will not be considered as being part of a warming hole anymore. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modelling and Forecasting Extreme Climate Events)
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Article
Validation of the High-Altitude Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler during the Tampa Bay Rain Experiment
Climate 2021, 9(6), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli9060089 - 29 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1063
Abstract
This paper deals with the validation of rain rate and wind speed measurements from the High-Altitude Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP), which occurred in September 2013 when the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle passed over an ocean rain squall line in [...] Read more.
This paper deals with the validation of rain rate and wind speed measurements from the High-Altitude Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP), which occurred in September 2013 when the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle passed over an ocean rain squall line in the Gulf of Mexico near the North Florida coast. The three-dimensional atmospheric rain distribution and the associated ocean surface wind vector field were simultaneously measured by two independent remote sensing and two in situ systems, namely the ground-based National Weather Service Next-Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD); the European Space Agency satellite Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT), and two instrumented weather buoys. These independent measurements provided the necessary data to calibrate the HIWRAP radar using the measured ocean radar backscatter and to validate the HIWRAP rain and wind vector retrievals against NEXRAD, ASCAT and ocean buoys observations. In addition, this paper presents data processing procedures for the HIWRAP instrument, including the development of a geometric model to collocate time-morphed rain rates from the NEXRAD radar with HIWRAP atmospheric rain profiles. Results of the rain rate intercomparison are presented, and they demonstrate excellent agreement with the NEXRAD time-interpolated rain volume scans. In our analysis, we find that HIWRAP produces wind and rain rates that are consistent with the supporting ground and satellite estimates, thereby providing validation of the geolocation, the calibration, and the geophysical retrieval algorithms for the HIWRAP instrument. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modelling and Forecasting Extreme Climate Events)
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