Recent Advances in Maternal and Fetal Health

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Neonatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 June 2024 | Viewed by 2730

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Filantropia Clinical Hospital, 011171 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: obstetrics–gynecology; fetal growth; prenatal screening; preterm birth; maternal and fetal health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Filantropia, Clinical Hospital Bucharest, 011171 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: obstetrics–gynecology; fetal growth; prenatal screening; preterm birth; maternal and fetal health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Improving prenatal care has been the main focus over the last few decades in this complex and rapidly evolving field of maternal–fetal medicine. Developing new tools in ultrasound diagnosis, expanding prenatal genetic diagnosis, finding new screening strategies for severe conditions such as preeclampsia or preterm birth, and implementing preventive measures have been the latest achievements aiming to reduce maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality.

The aim of this Special Issue of Children is to highlight recent advances in the fields of maternal and fetal medicine, including prenatal diagnosis of fetal genetic and structural abnormalities, new insights in the management of chronic or gestational maternal conditions, and new screening strategies of various pregnancy complications involving both the fetus and woman. Particular interest is focused on the fields of maternal hypertensive disorders, intrauterine growth restriction, recurrent pregnancy loss, preterm birth or stillbirth, and genetic and structural fetal abnormalities.

Submissions of original unpublished studies are welcome, including observational and interventional studies as well as RCTs and reviews.

Dr. Nicolae Gică
Dr. Anca Marina Ciobanu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • placental insufficiency
  • maternal medical conditions
  • ultrasound diagnosis
  • fetal genetic conditions
  • fetal growth
  • prenatal screening
  • perinatal morbidity
  • preterm birth

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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8 pages, 233 KiB  
Editorial
The Ethics and Practice of Periviability Care
by Alex C. Vidaeff and Joseph W. Kaempf
Children 2024, 11(4), 386; https://doi.org/10.3390/children11040386 - 23 Mar 2024
Viewed by 593
Abstract
Since the 1960s, the gestational age at which premature infants typically survive has decreased by approximately one week per decade [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Maternal and Fetal Health)

Research

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14 pages, 2030 KiB  
Article
Maternal Voice and Tactile Stimulation Modulate Oxytocin in Mothers of Hospitalized Preterm Infants: A Randomized Crossover Trial
by Jessica Hirschel, Audrey Carlhan-Ledermann, Céline Ferraz, Laure-Anne Brand, Manuela Filippa, Edouard Gentaz, Fleur Lejeune and Olivier Baud
Children 2023, 10(9), 1469; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10091469 - 28 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1000
Abstract
Prematurity is a major risk factor for perinatal stress and neonatal complications leading to systemic inflammation and abnormal mother–infant interactions. Oxytocin (OT) is a neuropeptide regulating the inflammatory response and promoting mother–infant bonding. The release of this hormone might be influenced by either [...] Read more.
Prematurity is a major risk factor for perinatal stress and neonatal complications leading to systemic inflammation and abnormal mother–infant interactions. Oxytocin (OT) is a neuropeptide regulating the inflammatory response and promoting mother–infant bonding. The release of this hormone might be influenced by either vocal or tactile stimulation. The main objective of the current randomized, crossover, clinical trial was to assess the salivary OT/cortisol balance in mothers following the exposure of their baby born preterm to two types of sensorial interventions: maternal voice without or with contingent tactile stimulation provided by the mother to her infant. Among the 26 mothers enrolled, maternal voice intervention alone had no effect on OT and cortisol levels in the mothers, but when associated with tactile stimulation, it induced a significant increase in maternal saliva oxytocin (38.26 ± 30.26 pg/mL before vs 53.91 ± 48.84 pg/mL after, p = 0.02), particularly in the mothers who delivered a female neonate. Maternal voice intervention induced a significant reduction in cortisol and an increase in OT levels in mothers when the maternal voice with a tactile stimulation intervention was performed first. In conclusion, exposure to the maternal voice with a contingent tactile stimulation was associated with subtle changes in the maternal hormonal balance between OT and cortisol. These findings need to be confirmed in a larger sample size and may ultimately guide caregivers in providing the best intervention to reduce parental stress following preterm delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Maternal and Fetal Health)
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Review

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16 pages, 558 KiB  
Review
Exploring Progesterone Deficiency in First-Trimester Miscarriage and the Impact of Hormone Therapy on Foetal Development: A Scoping Review
by Munkhtuya Bataa, Erini Abdelmessih and Fahad Hanna
Children 2024, 11(4), 422; https://doi.org/10.3390/children11040422 - 02 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Background and Objectives: Progesterone deficiency during pregnancy may lead to various complications, including first-trimester miscarriage, which is the most common pregnancy complication. However, progesterone therapy may play a role in pregnancy maintenance and foetal development. The aim of this scoping review is to [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: Progesterone deficiency during pregnancy may lead to various complications, including first-trimester miscarriage, which is the most common pregnancy complication. However, progesterone therapy may play a role in pregnancy maintenance and foetal development. The aim of this scoping review is to present evidence on the link between progesterone deficiency and first-trimester miscarriage among pregnant women and assess the impact of progesterone therapy on foetal development. Methods: A comprehensive global systematic search of mainly primary research studies was conducted using several databases. Peer-reviewed studies published between 2010 and 2023 were included. The scoping review was conducted using the framework outlined by the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) and reported using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses—Extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR) statement. Results: Twenty-three articles (which included 35,862 participants) were included in the analysis. Most studies were conducted in mid- to high-income countries. All 23 articles reported a significant positive relationship between progesterone deficiency and first-trimester miscarriage. Furthermore, the majority of studies reported a higher risk of miscarriage when lower levels of progesterone are combined with other declined hormones. While most studies reported that progesterone therapy may reduce the rate of first-trimester miscarriage among pregnant women, no evidence of health-related harm to offspring development was reported. Conclusions: The findings from this systematic–scoping review indicate possible benefits of progesterone replacement therapy in maintaining a healthy pregnancy and foetal development. Rigorous studies that include large sample sizes and systematic reviews are required to confirm these findings further. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Maternal and Fetal Health)
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