Latest Advances in Allergy and Clinical Immunology in Children

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Allergy and Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2023) | Viewed by 2758

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma, 43121 Parma, Italy
Interests: asthma; atopic dermatitis; rhinitis; food allergy; anaphylaxis; immunodeficiencies; vaccine; allergy prevention; drug
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Interests: atopic dermatitis; food allergy; allergic asthma; respiratory obstructive sleep disorders; anaphylaxis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent scientific developments in the field of allergic and immunological diseases have paved the way for improving the management of these conditions. The sphere of pathophysiology requires continuous updating due to the introduction of new therapies, biologic treatments and genetic studies as our understanding of environmental influence on allergic diseases is refined. The aim of this Special Issue is to encourage researchers to share their findings and to present innovations that have emerged over the last year. Reviews on epidemiology, mechanisms, clinical features and treatment are also of interest. We welcome original articles, review articles, and mini review articles.

Prof. Dr. Carlo Caffarelli
Prof. Dr. Giampaolo Ricci
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • allergy
  • asthma
  • atopic dermatitis
  • rhinitis
  • food allergy
  • anaphylaxis
  • immunodeficiencies
  • vaccine
  • allergy prevention
  • drug allergy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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13 pages, 868 KiB  
Systematic Review
Microbiome in Nasal Mucosa of Children and Adolescents with Allergic Rhinitis: A Systematic Review
by André Costa Azevedo, Sandra Hilário and Micael F. M. Gonçalves
Children 2023, 10(2), 226; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10020226 - 27 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2391
Abstract
The human upper respiratory tract comprises the nasal cavity, pharynx and larynx regions and offers distinct microbial communities. However, an imbalance and alterations in the nasal mucosa microbiome enhance the risk of chronic respiratory conditions in patients with allergic respiratory diseases. This is [...] Read more.
The human upper respiratory tract comprises the nasal cavity, pharynx and larynx regions and offers distinct microbial communities. However, an imbalance and alterations in the nasal mucosa microbiome enhance the risk of chronic respiratory conditions in patients with allergic respiratory diseases. This is particularly important in children and adolescents once allergic rhinitis (AR) is an inflammatory disorder of the nasal mucosa, often associated with an increase in pulmonary allergic inflammation. Therefore, this systematic review aimed to collect scientific data published concerning the microbial community alterations in nasal mucosa of children and adolescents suffering from AR or in association with adenotonsillar hypertrophy (AH) and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). The current study was performed using the guidelines of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). Publications related to microbiome alterations in the nasal mucosa in pediatric age, studies including next-generation sequencing platforms, and studies exclusively written in the English language were some of the inclusion criteria. In total, five articles were included. Despite the scarcity of the published data in this research field and the lack of prospective studies, the genera Acinetobacter, Corynebacterium, Dolosigranulum, Haemophilus, Moraxella, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus dominate the nares and nasopharyngeal microbiome of the pediatric population regardless of their age. However, an imbalance in the resident bacterial community in the nasal mucosa was observed. The genera Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas were more abundant in the nasal cavity of AR and AH children, while Streptococcus and Moraxella were predominant in the hypopharyngeal region of AR infants. An abundance of Staphylococcus spp. was also reported in the anterior nares and hypopharyngeal region of children and adolescents suffering from AR passive smoke exposure and ARC. These records suggest that different nasal structures, ageing, smoke exposure and the presence of other chronic disorders shape the nasal mucosa microbiome. Therefore, the establishment of adequate criteria for sampling would be established for a deeper understanding and a trustworthy comparison of the microbiome alterations in pediatric age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Advances in Allergy and Clinical Immunology in Children)
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