Special Issue "Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Chemo- and Bio-Sensors"

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials for Chemical Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 August 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Kien Wen Sun
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan
Interests: nanolithography and nanoimprint; nanomaterials; nano characterization; 2D perovskites; chemical sensor; biosensor; solar cell; light-emitting device
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Detection of important analytes for biological and environmental purposes has become the concept of interest in sensory research. In this light, many organic–inorganic hybrid systems have been investigated as promising candidates with exceptional analytical applications. Such hybrid systems manifest their sensor responses to specific analytes via optical fluctuations in luminescence, absorbance, electrochemical deviations, electrical property variation, mass change in surface, thermal and magnetic properties alteration, etc. Organic–inorganic hybrid system-based sensors may involve hybrid metal halide perovskites, metal–organic framework/organometallic complexes, organic or biomolecules functionalized metal nanoparticles/clusters/quantum dots, organic–inorganic composites, and hybrid semiconductor materials. Based on diverse mechanistic approaches, these materials may involve the discrimination of toxic gases, volatile organic compounds, metal ions, anions, pHs, biomolecules, and so forth.

The aim of this Special Issue is to deliver the recent advances on “Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Chemo- and Bio-Sensors” and to stimulate the development of such sensory probes towards specific analyte determination. The major scope of this issue will cover chemo- and bio-sensory applications of organic–inorganic hybrid architectures, such as hybrid metal halide perovskites, metal–organic framework/organometallic complexes, and sensory demonstrations of all hybrid systems with organic–inorganic combinations.

Dr. Kien Wen Sun
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Organic–inorganic hybrid system
  • Hybrid metal halide perovskite sensors
  • Electrochemical detection
  • Electrical sensors
  • Optical sensors
  • Metal–organic framework
  • Hybrid nanostructures
  • Supramolecular sensors

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Identification of Mint Scents Using a QCM Based E-Nose
Chemosensors 2021, 9(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9020031 - 04 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 504
Abstract
Mints emit diverse scents that exert specific biological functions and are relevance for applications. The current work strives to develop electronic noses that can electronically discriminate the scents emitted by different species of Mint as alternative to conventional profiling by gas chromatography. Here, [...] Read more.
Mints emit diverse scents that exert specific biological functions and are relevance for applications. The current work strives to develop electronic noses that can electronically discriminate the scents emitted by different species of Mint as alternative to conventional profiling by gas chromatography. Here, 12 different sensing materials including 4 different metal oxide nanoparticle dispersions (AZO, ZnO, SnO2, ITO), one Metal Organic Frame as Cu(BPDC), and 7 different polymer films, including PVA, PEDOT:PSS, PFO, SB, SW, SG, and PB were used for functionalizing of Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) sensors. The purpose was to discriminate six economically relevant Mint species (Mentha x piperita, Mentha spicata, Mentha spicata ssp. crispa, Mentha longifolia, Agastache rugosa, and Nepeta cataria). The adsorption and desorption datasets obtained from each modified QCM sensor were processed by three different classification models, including Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), and k-Nearest Neighbor Analysis (k-NN). This allowed discriminating the different Mints with classification accuracies of 97.2% (PCA), 100% (LDA), and 99.9% (k-NN), respectively. Prediction accuracies with a repeating test measurement reached up to 90.6% for LDA, and 85.6% for k-NN. These data demonstrate that this electronic nose can discriminate different Mint scents in a reliable and efficient manner. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Chemo- and Bio-Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparing Surface Plasmon-Optical and Electronic Immuno-Sensing of Affinity Interactions—A Case Study
Chemosensors 2021, 9(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9010011 - 05 Jan 2021
Viewed by 608
Abstract
In this case study, we provide a few examples for affinity-sensors based on optical detection concepts and compare them with electronic read-out schemes. We concentrate and briefly summarize two of the most advanced versions in each category: one is a surface-plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence [...] Read more.
In this case study, we provide a few examples for affinity-sensors based on optical detection concepts and compare them with electronic read-out schemes. We concentrate and briefly summarize two of the most advanced versions in each category: one is a surface-plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopic approach, while in the electronic sensing domain we concentrate on graphene-based field-effect transistors as the read-out platform. Both transduction principles are surface-sensitive and-selective, however, with penetration lengths into the analyte solution (e.g., into a flow cell attached) that are very different and that depend on totally different physical principles: while for surface-plasmons the evanescent character of the plasmon mode, propagating along the noble metal-solution interface with a penetration length in the order of 100 nm (for Au/water and a laser wavelength of = 632.8 nm), the “penetration depth” in electronic transistor-based sensing is governed by the Debye length which, for a physiological salt environment, amounts to less than 1 nm. Taking these differences into account, one can optimize the sensor read-out by the appropriate interfacial architecture used to functionalize the transducers by immobilizing one of the affinity interaction partners. We will discuss this for both concepts by giving a few examples of the achievable limit of detection for both methods. The examples discussed include a classical system, i.e., the binding of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) to its surface-immobilized antibodies or Fab fragments, the detection of lipopolysaccharides in a tethered bimolecular lipid membrane, and, as an example for small analyte detection by antibodies, the monitoring of aflatoxin B1, a member of the food toxin family of mycotoxins. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Chemo- and Bio-Sensors)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Progress in Metal-Organic Frameworks Facilitated Mercury Detection and Removal
Chemosensors 2021, 9(5), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors9050101 - 04 May 2021
Viewed by 259
Abstract
Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are noted as exceptional candidates towards the detection and removal of specific analytes. MOFs were reported in particular for the detection/removal of environmental contaminants, such as heavy metal ions, toxic anions, hazardous gases, explosives, etc. Among heavy metal ions, [...] Read more.
Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are noted as exceptional candidates towards the detection and removal of specific analytes. MOFs were reported in particular for the detection/removal of environmental contaminants, such as heavy metal ions, toxic anions, hazardous gases, explosives, etc. Among heavy metal ions, mercury has been noted as a global hazard because of its high toxicity in the elemental (Hg0), divalent cationic (Hg2+), and methyl mercury (CH3Hg+) forms. To secure the environment and living organisms, many countries have imposed stringent regulations to monitor mercury at all costs. Regarding the detection/removal requirements of mercury, researchers have proposed and reported all kinds of MOFs-based luminescent/non-luminescent probes towards mercury. This review provides valuable information about the MOFs which have been engaged in detection and removal of elemental mercury and Hg2+ ions. Moreover, the involved mechanisms or adsorption isotherms related to sensors or removal studies are clarified for the readers. Finally, advantages and limitations of MOFs in mercury detection/removal are described together with future scopes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Chemo- and Bio-Sensors)
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