Special Issue "Printed Electroanalytical Tools for De-Centralized Applications"

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Stefano Cinti

University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Department of Chemical Science and Technologies, Rome, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: electronalysis; sensors and biosensors; screen-printed electrodes; nanomaterials; paper-based diagnostics; Lab-on-chip; Point-of-Care
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Fabiana Arduini

Department of Chemical Sciences and Technologies, Università degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: electrochemical sensors; screen-printed electrodes; paper-based devices; biosensors based on enzyme inhibition; nanomaterial-based (bio)sensors; carbon black as electrode modifiers; (bio)sensors for environmental and security applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, analytical chemistry has moved towards miniaturized, cost-effective, and easy-to-use analytical tools to deliver sustainable devices capable of matching the ASSURED criteria (affordable, sensitive, specific, user-friendly, rapid and robust, equipment-free and deliverable to end users) outlined by the World Health Organization (WHO). Although these tools are generally combined with different readouts (e.g., electrochemical, colorimetric, fluorimetric), the electrochemical tools have been widely exploited thanks to their outstanding features, such as simplicity and “blindness” towards colored solutions. However, the “real” strength of electroanalysis for smart applications is strictly related to the progress made in printing technology. Printed electrodes are mainly manufactured by using screen-printing, inkjet printing, and photolithography, and they can be easily miniaturized, customized, and applied for on-site analyses. In addition to these manufacturing techniques, the use of micro/nanosized modifiers and “relatively” novel substrates for printing, e.g., filter paper, are capable to definitely enhance their features in terms of easiness to use and of analytical performances namely sensitivity, repeatability, robustness and selectivity. In this overall scenario, we invite to submit new research in electrochemical printed sensors and biosensors for clinical, environmental, and agri-food applications.

Dr. Stefano Cinti
Prof. Dr. Fabiana Arduini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Electroanalysis
  • Printed electrodes
  • Chemical sensors
  • Biosensors
  • Immunosensors
  • Nanomaterials
  • Reagent-free
  • ASSURED
  • Paper-based

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Impedance Study of Dopamine Effects after Application on 2D and 3D Neuroblastoma Cell Cultures Developed on a 3D-Printed Well
Received: 30 November 2018 / Revised: 25 January 2019 / Accepted: 30 January 2019 / Published: 5 February 2019
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Abstract
In this work, the assessment of the interactions of a bioactive substance applied to immobilized cells in either a two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) arrangement mimicking in vivo tissue conditions is presented. In particular, dopamine (DA) was selected as a stimulant for the [...] Read more.
In this work, the assessment of the interactions of a bioactive substance applied to immobilized cells in either a two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) arrangement mimicking in vivo tissue conditions is presented. In particular, dopamine (DA) was selected as a stimulant for the implementation of an impedance analysis with a specific type of neural cells (murine neuroblastoma). The aim of this study was the extraction of calibration curves at various frequencies with different known dopamine concentrations for the description of the behavior of dopamine applied to 2D and 3D cell cultures. The results present the evaluation of the mean impedance value for each immobilization technique in each frequency. The differential responses showed the importance of the impedance when frequency is applied in both 2D and 3D immobilization cases. More specifically, in 2D immobilization matrix impedance shows higher values in comparison with the 3D cell culture. Additionally, in the 3D case, the impedance decreases with increasing concentration, while in the 2D case, an opposite behavior was observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed Electroanalytical Tools for De-Centralized Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle From Batch to Flow Stripping Analysis with Screen-Printed Electrodes: A Possible Way to Decentralize Trace Inorganic Analysis
Chemosensors 2018, 6(3), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors6030037
Received: 31 July 2018 / Revised: 29 August 2018 / Accepted: 3 September 2018 / Published: 5 September 2018
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Abstract
Decentralization of on-site and in-site trace metal analysis has been a key topic over the last 30 years, owing to the increasing need for environmental protection as well as industrial and health-based field applications. In trace (and ultratrace) metal analysis, electrochemical stripping analysis [...] Read more.
Decentralization of on-site and in-site trace metal analysis has been a key topic over the last 30 years, owing to the increasing need for environmental protection as well as industrial and health-based field applications. In trace (and ultratrace) metal analysis, electrochemical stripping analysis with mercury (or bismuth) screen-printed film electrodes has shown a fast growth in popularity thanks to the good limits of detection, the ease of application in the field, and the low cost. Moreover, the availability of new wall-jet flow cells has opened the opportunity for their use in in situ industrial monitoring. The analytical figures of merit in stripping voltammetry with screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) under decentralized conditions and/or with sensor arrays are heavily affected by some analytical factors, primarily the presence of a pseudo-reference electrode, the efficiency of mass transport during the preconcentration step, and the need for external calibration. A careful model investigation of the analytical parameters for an efficient use of SPEs in decentralized conditions has been undertaken and discussed. Different instrumental approaches were investigated, comparing optimized batch conditions and flow cell operation under either continuous flow or stopped-flow sample injection. The stripping efficiency under wall-jet flow conditions was found to be high and comparable to that in batch conditions, leading to sub-ppb (μg/L) limit of detection (LOD) figures. Finally, external calibration in stripping voltammetry was studied as a viable alternative to conventional standard addition quantitation. Results showed, indeed, that external calibration was demonstrated to be reliable for quantitation of Pb and Cd in real water samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed Electroanalytical Tools for De-Centralized Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Increasing the Efficiency and Accuracy of Labile Cu Measurement in Wine with Screen-Printed Electrodes
Chemosensors 2018, 6(3), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors6030035
Received: 8 August 2018 / Revised: 14 August 2018 / Accepted: 14 August 2018 / Published: 17 August 2018
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Abstract
Development of oxidative and reductive flavors in wine can be influenced by the concentration and form of Cu within the wine. Electrochemical techniques have been devised to quantitate electrochemically active Cu (labile) in wine, as opposed to inactive Cu (non-labile). However, the electrochemical [...] Read more.
Development of oxidative and reductive flavors in wine can be influenced by the concentration and form of Cu within the wine. Electrochemical techniques have been devised to quantitate electrochemically active Cu (labile) in wine, as opposed to inactive Cu (non-labile). However, the electrochemical methods to measure labile Cu may be biased by the wine matrix, require lengthy calibration processes and/or unduly perturb the wine matrix during measurement. In this study, medium exchange stripping potentiometry was utilized with a thin mercury film on a screen-printed carbon electrode to provide a quantitation method that could largely overcome these limitations. The best average recoveries for 0.040 mg/L of labile Cu of 101 ± 15% (n = 12) were observed using composite calibration graphs prepared in oxidized wines and on multiple electrodes and using Pb as an internal standard. Composite calibration curves performed on different electrodes to the sample analysis were as effective in quantifying labile Cu as calibration curves performed on the same electrode as the sample. The results allow selection of a quantitation procedure that will suit the required speed and accuracy of labile Cu determination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed Electroanalytical Tools for De-Centralized Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Inkjet-Printed Wireless Chemiresistive Sensors—A Review
Chemosensors 2018, 6(4), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors6040066
Received: 23 November 2018 / Revised: 10 December 2018 / Accepted: 11 December 2018 / Published: 14 December 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3064 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Microelectronic devices have great potential to be integrated into the Internet of Things, bringing benefits to the environment, society, and economy. Especially, microscaled chemical sensors for environmental monitoring are of great interest since they can be manufactured by cost, time, and resource efficient [...] Read more.
Microelectronic devices have great potential to be integrated into the Internet of Things, bringing benefits to the environment, society, and economy. Especially, microscaled chemical sensors for environmental monitoring are of great interest since they can be manufactured by cost, time, and resource efficient inkjet printing technology. The aim of the present literature review is a reflection of state-of-the-art inkjet-printed chemiresistive sensors. It examines current material approaches used to realize printed chemiresistors, especially the challenges in the realisation of accurate electrode patterns as well as the deposition of various sensing materials by inkjet printing technology. The review will be completed by an overview of current research activities dealing with the integration of chemiresistive sensors into wireless applications. The result of this review confirms that during the last decades, the number of publications covering inkjet-printed chemical, especially chemiresistive, sensors and their introduction into the Internet of Things is growing. Furthermore, it reveals the need for further research regarding material science and printing technology compatibility to achieve reliable and reproducible chemiresistive sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed Electroanalytical Tools for De-Centralized Applications)
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