Special Issue "Novel Processing Routes of Ceramics for Functional Applications"

A special issue of Ceramics (ISSN 2571-6131).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Stephane Hocquet

Belgian Ceramic Research Centre, Avenue Gouverneur Cornez 4, 7000 Mons, Belgium
Website | E-Mail
Interests: bioceramics; porous scaffold manufacturing; ceramics shaping; sintering and characterizations
Guest Editor
Dr. Laurent Boilet

Belgian Ceramic Research Centre, Avenue Gouverneur Cornez 4, 7000 Mons, Belgium
Website | E-Mail
Interests: field assisted sintering; transparent ceramics; hard materials; bioceramics; mechanical properties

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For several decades, new advances in powder preparation, shaping and densification technologies have enabled ceramic materials to conquer previously-unimagined fields of application. Indeed, known as fragile and difficult to machine, ceramics have now acquired optimized and sufficient properties and functionalities for sectors, such as biomedical, electronics, energy conversion and storage, automotive and railroad, aeronautics, nuclear and many others. This diversification of applications could have occurred thanks to the development of new technologies: Field assisted sintering, rapid prototyping, 3D printing, freeze drying, etc., and/or the tailoring of existing processes to ceramics: plasma projection, laser machining, injection molding, etc.

This Special Issue is about the following topics (non-exhaustive list):

  • Ceramics for biomedical applications
  • Advanced sintering techniques
  • Transparent ceramics
  • Rapid prototyping
  • (Ultra) high temperature ceramics
  • Thermomechanical ceramics

The use of new experimental characterization techniques is also part of the scope of this Special Issue. Particular attention will be paid to articles that will highlight the relationships between desired properties, functionalities and structures for a given application and the appropriate choice of implemented technologies.

Dr. Stephane Hocquet
Dr. Laurent Boilet
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Ceramics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Functional ceramics
  • Ceramics for biomedical
  • Transparent ceramics
  • Rapid prototyping
  • Advanced shaping and sintering

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Deriving Principles of the Freeze-Foaming Process by Nondestructive CT Macrostructure Analyses on Hydroxyapatite Foams
Ceramics 2018, 1(1), 65-82; https://doi.org/10.3390/ceramics1010007
Received: 2 May 2018 / Revised: 8 June 2018 / Accepted: 8 June 2018 / Published: 17 June 2018
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Abstract
Freeze Foaming is a direct foaming method that aims at manufacturing ceramic cellular scaffolds for diverse applications. Next to porous structures for a potential use as refractories, the focus lies on potential bone replacement material. The main challenge of this foaming method is
[...] Read more.
Freeze Foaming is a direct foaming method that aims at manufacturing ceramic cellular scaffolds for diverse applications. Next to porous structures for a potential use as refractories, the focus lies on potential bone replacement material. The main challenge of this foaming method is to achieve a homogeneous and predictable pore morphology. That is why, in a current project, the authors report on the pore morphology formation and evolution of the foaming process by means of nondestructive testing. This contribution primarily compares the effect of the suspension’s temperature on the resulting foam structure (foaming at 5 and 40 °C). As a basis for computed tomographic analysis, a stable and reproducible model suspension was developed that resulted in reproducible foam structures. Characterized by viscosity, foam structure analyses and foaming rate, the resulting Freeze Foams became adjustable with regards to their porosity and pore shape/size. Under certain conditions, we succeeded in achieving a relatively homogeneous pore structure, as proven by computed tomography-derived quantitative analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Processing Routes of Ceramics for Functional Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Electrical Behavior and Microstructural Features of Electric Field-Assisted and Conventionally Sintered 3 mol% Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia
Ceramics 2018, 1(1), 3-12; https://doi.org/10.3390/ceramics1010002
Received: 28 December 2017 / Revised: 10 February 2018 / Accepted: 18 February 2018 / Published: 21 February 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3166 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
ZrO2: 3 mol% Y2O3 (3YSZ) polycrystalline pellets were sintered at 1400 °C and by applying an alternating current (AC) electric field at 1000 °C. An alumina sample holder with platinum wires for connecting the sample to a power
[...] Read more.
ZrO2: 3 mol% Y2O3 (3YSZ) polycrystalline pellets were sintered at 1400 °C and by applying an alternating current (AC) electric field at 1000 °C. An alumina sample holder with platinum wires for connecting the sample to a power supply was designed for the electric field-assisted sintering experiments. The apparent density was evaluated with the Archimedes technique, the grain size distribution by analysis of scanning electron microscopy images, and the electrical behavior by the impedance spectroscopy technique. Sintering with the application of AC electric fields to 3YSZ enhances its ionic conductivity. An explanation is proposed, based on the dissolution back to the bulk of chemical species, which are depleted at the grain boundaries, leading to an increase in the oxygen vacancy concentration. For the enhancement of the grain boundary conductivity, an explanation is given based on the diminution of the concentration of depleted chemical species, which migrate to the bulk. This migration leads to a decrease of the potential barrier of the space charge region, known to be responsible for blocking the oxide ions through the intergranular region. Moreover, the heterogeneity of the distribution of the grain sizes is ascribed to the skin effect, the tendency of the AC current density to be largest near the surface, decreasing towards the bulk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Processing Routes of Ceramics for Functional Applications)
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