Advances in Lung Transplantation—Series 2

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Tissues and Organs".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 December 2023) | Viewed by 3999

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
2. Thoracic Surgery and Lung Transplantation Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda - Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico of Milan, Via F. Sforza, 35 20122 Milan, Italy
Interests: lung transplantation; donation after circulatory death (DCD); video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS); robotic-assisted thoracic surgery (RATS); diaphragm dysfunction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
2. Thoracic Surgery and Lung Transplantation Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda - Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico of Milan, Via F. Sforza, 35 20122 Milan, Italy
Interests: lung transplantation; non-small-cell lung cancer; mediastinum; thymic malignancies; video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS); robotic-assisted thoracic surgery (RATS)
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lung transplantation is a clinical reality for the treatment of benign end-stage respiratory diseases today. Candidates’ selection and correct timing, evaluation and management of potential donors, and therapy and post-transplant monitoring are certainly the most relevant aspects of this complicated path. Although great progress has been achieved in the overall approach, the results can still be improved, especially in terms of mortality and survival rates. The most relevant aspect is the incomplete understanding of the physiopathological mechanisms underlying the different phases of the donation–transplant process, from lung damage in the donor to chronic rejection in the recipient. In addition, the lack of harmony and contact between basic and clinical research has a great impact in an area where the two aspects should closely interact. This Special Issue aims to address the current and more challenging topics in the lung transplant scenario, facilitating a moment of dynamic debate between clinicians and researchers and providing the necessary tools to merge experiences.

This Special Issue aims to address the most current and challenging topics in the lung transplant scenario, facilitating a moment of dynamic debate between clinicians and physicians, providing the tools necessary to merge experiences.

We look forward to your contribution.

Dr. Alessandro Palleschi
Dr. Davide Tosi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • the history of lung transplantation
  • recipients: referral and listing
  • DBD donors
  • DCD donors
  • living donors
  • bridge to transplant
  • machine perfusion
  • intraoperative extracorporeal support
  • primary graft dysfunction
  • post-transplant prophylaxis
  • post-transplant surveillance
  • acute rejection
  • chronic rejection
  • post-transplant tumors
  • bronchial complications
  • retransplant
  • combined transplant
  • animal models for the study of lung transplantation
  • the artificial lung

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 198 KiB  
Editorial
Advances in Lung Transplantation
by Davide Tosi and Alessandro Palleschi
Cells 2023, 12(6), 923; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells12060923 - 17 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1043
Abstract
Nowadays, lung transplantation is a clinical reality for the treatment of benign end-stage respiratory diseases [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Lung Transplantation—Series 2)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

13 pages, 6646 KiB  
Article
The Immunopathology of Pulmonary Rejection after Murine Lung Transplantation
by Janne Kaes, Emilie Pollenus, Charlotte Hooft, Hengshuo Liu, Celine Aelbrecht, Seppe Cambier, Xin Jin, Jan Van Slambrouck, Hanne Beeckmans, Pieterjan Kerckhof, Greetje Vande Velde, Dirk Van Raemdonck, Ali Önder Yildirim, Philippe E. Van den Steen, Robin Vos, Laurens J. Ceulemans and Bart M. Vanaudenaerde
Cells 2024, 13(3), 241; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells13030241 - 27 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1076
Abstract
To improve outcomes following lung transplantation, it is essential to understand the immunological mechanisms that result in chronic graft failure. The associated clinical syndrome is termed chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD), which is known to be induced by alloimmune-dependent (i.e., rejection) and alloimmune-independent [...] Read more.
To improve outcomes following lung transplantation, it is essential to understand the immunological mechanisms that result in chronic graft failure. The associated clinical syndrome is termed chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD), which is known to be induced by alloimmune-dependent (i.e., rejection) and alloimmune-independent factors (e.g., infections, reflux and environmental factors). We aimed to explore the alloimmune-related mechanism, i.e., pulmonary rejection. In this study, we use a murine orthotopic left lung transplant model using isografts and allografts (C57BL/6 or BALB/c as donors to C57BL/6 recipients), with daily immunosuppression (10 mg/kg cyclosporin A and 1.6 mg/kg methylprednisolone). Serial sacrifice was performed at days 1, 7 and 35 post-transplantation (n = 6 at each time point for each group). Left transplanted lungs were harvested, a single-cell suspension was made and absolute numbers of immune cells were quantified using multicolor flow cytometry. The rejection process followed the principles of a classic immune response, including innate but mainly adaptive immune cells. At day 7 following transplantation, the numbers of interstitial macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells, NK cells, NKT cells, CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T and B cells were increased in allografts compared with isografts. Only dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells remained elevated at day 35 in allografts. Our study provides insights into the immunological mechanisms of true pulmonary rejection after murine lung transplantation. These results might be important in further research on diagnostic evaluation and treatment for CLAD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Lung Transplantation—Series 2)
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13 pages, 2915 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Tissue Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Lung Recipients Supported by Intraoperative Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Single-Center Pilot Study
by Fiorella Calabrese, Federica Pezzuto, Francesco Fortarezza, Francesca Lunardi, Eleonora Faccioli, Giulia Lorenzoni, Annalisa Boscolo, Nicolò Sella, Dario Gregori, Marco Schiavon, Paolo Navalesi, Andrea Dell’Amore and Federico Rea
Cells 2022, 11(22), 3681; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11223681 - 19 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1426
Abstract
Intraoperative veno-arterial (VA) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as intraoperative hemodynamic support during lung transplantation is becoming a standard practice due to promising clinical results. Nevertheless, studies on tissue/molecular pathways investigating ischemia/reperfusion injury are still lacking. Patients receiving a bilateral lung transplantation between January [...] Read more.
Intraoperative veno-arterial (VA) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as intraoperative hemodynamic support during lung transplantation is becoming a standard practice due to promising clinical results. Nevertheless, studies on tissue/molecular pathways investigating ischemia/reperfusion injury are still lacking. Patients receiving a bilateral lung transplantation between January 2012 and December 2018 at the University Hospital of Padova were included in this retrospective single-center observational study. The present study aimed to investigate ischemia/reperfusion injury in 51 tissue specimens obtained from 13 recipients supported by intraoperative VA-ECMO and 38 who were not. Several tissue analyses, including apoptosis evaluation and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, were performed on the biopsies at the time of transplantation. Lung samples from the ECMO group (both pre- and post-reperfusion) were comparable, or for some parameters better, than samples from the non-ECMO group. Leukocyte margination was significantly lower in the ECMO group than in the non-ECMO group. Primary graft dysfunction, mainly at 24 and 48 h, was correlated with the tissue injury score of the post-reperfusion biopsy. The interquartile ranges for all morphological parameters showed high grade variability between pre- and post-reperfusion in the non-ECMO group. These preliminary data support the use of intraoperative ECMO based on lower lung tissue ischemia/reperfusion injury. Larger case series are mandatory to confirm our findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Lung Transplantation—Series 2)
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