Special Issue "Catalyst Deactivation and Regeneration"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Pedro Castano
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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Bilbao, Spain
Interests: Reaction engineering, catalysis, catalyst deactivation, zeolites and zeoltypes, modeling, periodic reactors, coke formation
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Prof. Dr. Joris W. Thybaut
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Guest Editor
Laboratory for Chemical Technology (LCT), Department of Materials, Textiles and Chemical Engineering Technologiepark 125, 9052 Ghent, Belgium
Interests: kinetic modelling; reactor modelling; catalytic reactions; hydrogenation and hydrocracking; oxidative coupling of methane
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Dr. Ludovic Pinard
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
University of Poitiers, Institut de Chimie des Milieux et Matériaux de Poitiers (IC2MP) - UMR 7285 CNRS, France
Interests: zeolite; model reactions; bifunctional catalysis, catalyst deactivation, regeneration
Dr. Javier Ereña Loizaga
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of the Basque Country - UPV/EHU, Leioa, BI, Spain
Interests: alternative fuels; syngas; CO2 valorization; catalysts and catalytic reactions; synthesis of methanol, dimethyl ether (DME) and hydrocarbons
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The recent developments in areas orbiting around chemical engineering, such as material science, spectroscopy and computer science, are thrusting a new era of environmentally friendly processes and products with much better intensification capabilities. At the core, heterogeneous catalysts still play a leading role in those processes, but as more active materials are being used, their intrinsic stability and reusability cannot be overruled. Indeed, the “catalyst deactivation and regeneration” are of the uttermost importance for attaining an economically viable, yet sustainable chemical industry.

The special issue aims to renovate the interest in the field by bringing together researchers working in centered and transversal areas. The new techniques, catalysts and processes augur a new frontier for “catalyst deactivation and regeneration” that we hope to tackle in this special issue.

The Guest Editors welcome any potential work to be submitted for consideration.

Best regards

Dr. Pedro Castano
Dr. Joris Thybaut
Dr. Ludovic Pinard
Dr. Javier Ereña
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Deactivation
  • Regeneration
  • Rejuvenation
  • Coke fouling
  • Catalyst degradation
  • Sintering
  • Poisoning
  • Modelling
  • Prevention-mitigation

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Accelerating Kinetic Parameter Identification by Extracting Information from Transient Data: A Hydroprocessing Study Case
Catalysts 2020, 10(4), 361; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10040361 - 26 Mar 2020
Abstract
Hydroprocessing reactions require several days to reach steady-state, leading to long experimentation times for collecting sufficient data for kinetic modeling purposes. The information contained in the transient data during the evolution toward the steady-state is, at present, not used for kinetic modeling since [...] Read more.
Hydroprocessing reactions require several days to reach steady-state, leading to long experimentation times for collecting sufficient data for kinetic modeling purposes. The information contained in the transient data during the evolution toward the steady-state is, at present, not used for kinetic modeling since the stabilization behavior is not well understood. The present work aims at accelerating kinetic model construction by employing these transient data, provided that the stabilization can be adequately accounted for. A comparison between the model obtained against the steady-state data and the one after accounting for the transient information was carried out. It was demonstrated that by accounting for the stabilization, combined with an experimental design algorithm, a more robust and faster manner was obtained to identify kinetic parameters, which saves time and cost. An application was presented in hydrodenitrogenation, but the proposed methodology can be extended to any hydroprocessing reaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalyst Deactivation and Regeneration)
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Open AccessArticle
Regeneration of Raney®-Nickel Catalyst for the Synthesis of High-Value Amino-Ester Renewable Monomers
Catalysts 2020, 10(2), 229; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10020229 - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
Aiming to synthesize high-value renewable monomers for the preparation of renewable specialty polyamides, we designed a new protocol. Amino-esters, produced via the hydrogenation of unsaturated nitrile-esters, are alternative monomers for the production of these polymers. A high monomer yield can be obtained using [...] Read more.
Aiming to synthesize high-value renewable monomers for the preparation of renewable specialty polyamides, we designed a new protocol. Amino-esters, produced via the hydrogenation of unsaturated nitrile-esters, are alternative monomers for the production of these polymers. A high monomer yield can be obtained using a Raney®-nickel catalyst despite the drawback of fast deactivation. The hydrogenation of 10-cyano-9-decenoate (UNE11) was tentatively reactivated by three different regeneration procedures: solvent wash, regeneration under hydrogen, and regeneration under sonication. Among these procedures, the in-pot catalyst regeneration (H2 30 bar, 150 °C) demonstrated complete activity recovery and full recycling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalyst Deactivation and Regeneration)
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Open AccessArticle
Impact of the Framework Type on the Regeneration of Coked Zeolites by Non-Thermal Plasma in a Fixed Bed Dielectric Barrier Reactor
Catalysts 2019, 9(12), 985; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9120985 - 24 Nov 2019
Abstract
The formation of coke as a result of propene transformation at 623 K on zeolites results from a product shape selectivity mechanism of which the products are polyaromatic molecules, such as pyrene on MFI, anthracene on MOR, pyrene and coronene on FAU. Zeolite [...] Read more.
The formation of coke as a result of propene transformation at 623 K on zeolites results from a product shape selectivity mechanism of which the products are polyaromatic molecules, such as pyrene on MFI, anthracene on MOR, pyrene and coronene on FAU. Zeolite regeneration can be achieved by using non-thermal plasma (NTP), with decreased energy consumption, employing a fixed bed dielectric barrier reactor. The efficiency of this alternative regeneration process depends on the coke toxicity. On MFI and FAU (featuring three-dimensional 10 and 12 ring channel systems, respectively) coking occurs by poisoning the Brønsted acid sites; on MOR, (presenting a one-dimensional 12 ring channel system) pore blocking takes place, leading to higher coke toxicity. A complete coke removal is achieved on MFI and FAU zeolites using NTP within 3 h, while for MOR coke, removal proceeds slower and is incomplete after 3 h on stream. Hence, the efficiency of regeneration is impacted by the accessibility of active oxygenated species generated under plasma (e.g., O*, O2+) to coke molecules. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalyst Deactivation and Regeneration)
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Open AccessArticle
Elimination of Coke in an Aged Hydrotreating Catalyst via a Non-Thermal Plasma Process: Comparison with a Coked Zeolite
Catalysts 2019, 9(9), 783; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9090783 - 19 Sep 2019
Abstract
The removal of coke from an aged industrial hydrodesulfurization catalyst, using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) non-thermal plasma with a pin to plate geometry, was investigated. The aged catalyst was introduced into the plasma reactor as a thin wafer. After 130 minutes of plasma [...] Read more.
The removal of coke from an aged industrial hydrodesulfurization catalyst, using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) non-thermal plasma with a pin to plate geometry, was investigated. The aged catalyst was introduced into the plasma reactor as a thin wafer. After 130 minutes of plasma treatment, with P = 30 W, 70% of the coke was removed while more than 40% of the sulfur was still present. Characterization of catalyst at different locations of the wafer showed that the coke was more easily removed at the center, close to the pin electrode where the electric field was more intense. The formation of an unexpected phase, under the plasma discharge, was highlighted, it corresponded to the family of Keggin HPA PMo12O403−, which could be an interesting precursor of catalyst for the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) process. Compared with a coked zeolite, the rate of regeneration is lower for the HDS catalyst under plasma discharge, while a lower temperature is required under conventional thermal oxidation. This is explained by the presence of metal particles, which could be responsible for the limitation in O-atom formation under plasma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalyst Deactivation and Regeneration)
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Open AccessArticle
Catalyst/Feedstock Ratio Effect on FCC Using Different Catalysts Samples
Catalysts 2019, 9(6), 542; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9060542 - 17 Jun 2019
Abstract
The present study is a follow-up to a recent authors contribution which describes the effect of the C/O (catalyst/oil) ratio on catalytic cracking activity and catalyst deactivation. This study, while valuable, was limited to one fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) catalyst. The aim of [...] Read more.
The present study is a follow-up to a recent authors contribution which describes the effect of the C/O (catalyst/oil) ratio on catalytic cracking activity and catalyst deactivation. This study, while valuable, was limited to one fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) catalyst. The aim of the present study is to consider the C/O effect using three FCC catalysts with different activities and acidities. Catalysts were characterized in terms of crystallinity, total acidity, specific surface Area (SSA), temperature programmed ammonia desorption (NH3-TPD), and pyridine chemisorption. 1,3,5-TIPB (1,3,5-tri-isopropyl benzene) catalytic cracking runs were carried out in a bench-scale mini-fluidized batch unit CREC (chemical reactor engineering centre) riser simulator. All data were taken at 550 °C with a contact time of 7 s. Every experiment involved 0.2 g of 1,3,5-TIPB with the amount of catalyst changing in the 0.12–1 g range. The resulting 0.6–5 g oil/g cat ratios showed a consistent 1,3,5-TIPB conversion increasing first, then stabilizing, and finally decreasing modestly. On the other hand, coke formation and undesirable benzene selectivity always rose. Thus, the reported results show that catalyst density affects both catalyst coking and deactivation, displaying an optimum C/O ratio, achieving maximum hydrocarbon conversions in FCC units. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalyst Deactivation and Regeneration)
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