Special Issue "The Pathogenesis and Treatment of Headache Disorders"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Stephanie Nahas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Jefferson Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA
Interests: headache medicine; neurology; education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I invite you to submit your work for consideration in an upcoming Brain Sciences Special Issue on “The Pathogenesis and Treatment of Headache Disorders”. Original basic and clinical research, case reports, review articles, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews related to common and uncommon primary and secondary headache syndromes are welcomed. It is our hope to enhance the continually-evolving understanding of headache disorders by providing fresh insights to the etiology and management of a broad range of syndromes as illustrated by your contributions. Of greatest interest are novel biological discoveries and innovative applications of existing and newer drugs and devices. Thank you in advance for your efforts in unravelling the mysteries of what brings headaches about and to their resolution.

Stephanie J. Nahas, MD, MSEd
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pathogenesis
  • pathophysiology
  • etiology
  • treatment
  • management
  • headache
  • migraine
  • cluster headache
  • trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia
  • trigeminal neuralgia
  • cranial neuralgia
  • medication overuse headache
  • chronic migraine
  • tension-type headache
  • primary headache
  • secondary headache
  • uncommon headache syndromes

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Medication-Overuse Headache: Differences between Daily and Near-Daily Headache Patients
Brain Sci. 2016, 6(3), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci6030030 - 15 Aug 2016
Cited by 4Correction
Abstract
Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is a challenging neurological disease, which brings frustration for sufferers and treating physicians. The patient’s lack of adherence and limited treatment evidence are frequent. The aim of this study was to compare the outcome and treatment strategies between consecutive MOH [...] Read more.
Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is a challenging neurological disease, which brings frustration for sufferers and treating physicians. The patient’s lack of adherence and limited treatment evidence are frequent. The aim of this study was to compare the outcome and treatment strategies between consecutive MOH patients with daily and near-daily headache from a tertiary center. Methods: Every consecutive patient seen between January and December 2014 with the diagnosis of MOH was included. Psychiatric comorbidities, inability to inform baseline headache frequency, current or previous two-month use of preventive medications, and refusal to sign informed consent were exclusion criteria. The patients were evaluated in thorough initial consultations and divided in two groups based on their baseline headache frequency. The diagnosis and treatment strategies were clearly explained. The filling out of a detailed headache diary was requested from all patients. Endpoints compared headache frequency and adherence after two, four, and eight months between the two study groups. Results: One-hundred sixty-eight patients (31 male, 137 female) met the inclusion criteria. Nineteen patients (11.3%) were excluded. All patients had migraine or chronic migraine as primary headaches. Eighty had daily (DH), and 69 near-daily headache (NDH), at baseline consultation. Mean baseline frequency was 24.8 headache days/month (18.9 days/month for the near-daily group), average headache history was 20.6 years and mean time with >15 headache days/month was 4.8 years. Outpatient withdrawal, starting prevention, and enforcing the correct use of rescue therapy was carried out with all patients. After two months, 88% of the DH and 71% of the NDH groups adhered to treatment (p = 0.0002). The HF decreased to 12 and 9 headache days/month, respectively in DH and NDH groups (p > 0.05, non-significant) (Intention-to-treat (ITT) 14 DH; 12 NDH; p > 0.05). After four and eight months, 86.3% and 83.7% of the DH patients, and 59.4% and 55% of the NDH patients were still under treatment (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.0001). The HF decreased, respectively, to nine and nine headache days/month in the DH patients compared to 6 and 7 headache days/month in the NDH group (p > 0.05) (ITT, 12; 12; DH; 10; 11; NDH; p > 0.05). Conclusions: Although open studies provide limited conclusions, withdrawing overused medications and starting prevention may have helped the favorable outcomes. However, daily headache patients had a significantly higher adherence and lower relapse rates than near-daily headache patients, despite a considerable reduced headache frequency in both groups. Additionally, real-world patient studies are scarce and the comparison between these two subsets of patients may be useful to guide clinicians in approaching their patients. Controlled studies are necessary to confirm these observations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Pathogenesis and Treatment of Headache Disorders)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Acute Confusional Migraine: Distinct Clinical Entity or Spectrum of Migraine Biology?
Brain Sci. 2018, 8(2), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8020029 - 07 Feb 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
The goal of this review is to explore the literature reports of acute confusional migraine (ACM) including patient characteristics, migraine symptomatology, and proposed diagnostic criteria. A literature review was conducted using PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science using the terms “confusional migraine” and [...] Read more.
The goal of this review is to explore the literature reports of acute confusional migraine (ACM) including patient characteristics, migraine symptomatology, and proposed diagnostic criteria. A literature review was conducted using PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science using the terms “confusional migraine” and “confusional state in migraine”. All the relevant articles from 1970 to 2016 were included. A total of 120 patients were found in the literature. Most of the cases were seen in the pediatric population with a slight male predominance. Personal or family history of migraine was common. Most patients had a headache prior to the confusional state. In addition to confusion and agitation, some developed visual (32.5%) and/or sensory symptoms (19%) and/or speech problems (39%) either prior to or during the confusional state. Data on treatment outcomes is lacking. Patients with most common forms of migraine report attention and cognitive disturbances but awareness remains intact as opposed to patients with ACM. ACM is a distinct entity and should be included as part of the appendix of International Classification of Headache Disoders-3 beta version (ICHD-3β) criteria. Prospective studies are needed to further study this disorder and its association with other migraine forms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Pathogenesis and Treatment of Headache Disorders)
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Open AccessReview
The Role of Adenosine Signaling in Headache: A Review
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(3), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7030030 - 13 Mar 2017
Cited by 15
Abstract
Migraine is the third most prevalent disease on the planet, yet our understanding of its mechanisms and pathophysiology is surprisingly incomplete. Recent studies have built upon decades of evidence that adenosine, a purine nucleoside that can act as a neuromodulator, is involved in [...] Read more.
Migraine is the third most prevalent disease on the planet, yet our understanding of its mechanisms and pathophysiology is surprisingly incomplete. Recent studies have built upon decades of evidence that adenosine, a purine nucleoside that can act as a neuromodulator, is involved in pain transmission and sensitization. Clinical evidence and rodent studies have suggested that adenosine signaling also plays a critical role in migraine headache. This is further supported by the widespread use of caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, in several headache treatments. In this review, we highlight evidence that supports the involvement of adenosine signaling in different forms of headache, headache triggers, and basic headache physiology. This evidence supports adenosine A2A receptors as a critical adenosine receptor subtype involved in headache pain. Adenosine A2A receptor signaling may contribute to headache via the modulation of intracellular Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production or 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in neurons and glia to affect glutamatergic synaptic transmission within the brainstem. This evidence supports the further study of adenosine signaling in headache and potentially illuminates it as a novel therapeutic target for migraine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Pathogenesis and Treatment of Headache Disorders)

Other

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Open AccessCorrection
Correction: Krymchantowski, A.V.; et al. Medication-Overuse Headache: Differences between Daily and Near-Daily Headache Patients; Brain Sciences 2016, 6, 30
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(3), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7030031 - 17 Mar 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Pathogenesis and Treatment of Headache Disorders)
Open AccessCase Report
An Unusual Case of Post-Traumatic Headache Complicated by Intracranial Hypotension
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7010003 - 29 Dec 2016
Cited by 2
Abstract
We present a case of post-traumatic headache complicated by intracranial hypotension resulting in an acquired Chiari malformation and myelopathy with syringomyelia. This constellation of findings suggest a possible series of events that started with a traumatic cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leak, followed by [...] Read more.
We present a case of post-traumatic headache complicated by intracranial hypotension resulting in an acquired Chiari malformation and myelopathy with syringomyelia. This constellation of findings suggest a possible series of events that started with a traumatic cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leak, followed by descent of the cerebellar tonsils and disruption of CSF circulation that caused spinal cord swelling and syrinx. This unusual presentation of post-traumatic headache highlights the varying presentations and the potential sequelae of intracranial hypotension. In addition, the delayed onset of upper motor neuron symptoms along with initially normal head computerized tomography scan (CT) findings, beg the question of whether or not a post-traumatic headache warrants earlier magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Pathogenesis and Treatment of Headache Disorders)
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