Special Issue "Psychotherapeutic Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 March 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Valentina Cardi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Section of Eating Disorders, Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom
Interests: eating disorders; obesity; social functioning; psychotherapy; anxiety

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The goal of this Special Issue is to discuss the use of novel treatment modules to improve standard care for anorexia nervosa. Special attention will be given to two aspects, in particular: 1) the development and implementation of personalised approaches and 2) treatment adaptations based on i) age (i.e., children and adolescents vs. adults), specific comorbidities (e.g., affective and personality disorders, neurodevelopmental disorders) and ii) illness duration (i.e., short vs. longer duration). Scientific contributions based on the use of multimodal assessment methods, including psychometric measures, neuroimaging techniques and cognitive and neuropsychological testing are strongly encouraged.

Dr. Valentina Cardi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Anorexia nervosa
  • Psychotherapy
  • Innovation
  • Treatment adaptations

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
The Role of the Embodiment Disturbance in the Anorexia Nervosa Psychopathology: A Network Analysis Study
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(10), 276; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9100276 - 15 Oct 2019
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 2195
Abstract
Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is characterized by body image distortion. From a phenomenological perspective, body image disturbance has been associated with a more profound disturbance encompassing disorders of the way persons experience their own body. The aim of this study was to disentangle the [...] Read more.
Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is characterized by body image distortion. From a phenomenological perspective, body image disturbance has been associated with a more profound disturbance encompassing disorders of the way persons experience their own body. The aim of this study was to disentangle the complex dynamics that connect the experience of one’s own body and self-identity to the psychopathological features of AN by applying a network analysis. Fifty-seven patients with AN restrictive subtype and 27 with AN binge–purging subtype participated in the study. Eating Disorders Inventory-2 and Identity and Eating Disorders subscores, measuring the embodiment dimensions, were included in the network. Two of the main dimensions of embodiment—feeling extraneous from one’s own body and feeling oneself through objective measures—were the nodes with the highest strength together with interoceptive awareness (IA). IA was a node included in several pathways connecting embodiment dimensions with most of the AN psychopathological dimensions. The centrality of the embodiment disorder suggests the importance of considering the body image disturbance in people with AN as resulting from their difficulty in experiencing inner states and as a tool to build its own self. This assumption may orient therapeutic interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychotherapeutic Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa)
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Article
Well-Being Workshops in Eating Disorder Wards and Their Perceived Benefits to Patients and the Multi-Disciplinary Team: A Pilot Study
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(10), 247; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9100247 - 23 Sep 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1691
Abstract
A more holistic definition of patients’ recovery from eating disorders (EDs) highlights that well-being interventions linked to self-compassion are under-researched and under-utilised. Staff burnout is also common in ED units (EDUs), linked to difficult relationships with patients and poor self-care, and is not [...] Read more.
A more holistic definition of patients’ recovery from eating disorders (EDs) highlights that well-being interventions linked to self-compassion are under-researched and under-utilised. Staff burnout is also common in ED units (EDUs), linked to difficult relationships with patients and poor self-care, and is not well addressed. Therefore we piloted a series of joint well-being workshops to target these issues. Joint workshops were offered to patients (n = 55) and the multi-disciplinary team MDT (n = 34) in adult ED wards over two years. Experiences were evaluated quantitively and qualitatively. Mood post-workshops increased significantly for both groups (patients: p < 0.001, r = 0.49; MDT: z = 3.043, p = 0.002, r = 0.41), with the feeling that they deserved to take time for self-care (patients: z = 2.419, p = 0.016, r = 0.31); MDT: z = 2.814, p = 0.005, r = 0.38). Workshops were found to be enjoyable and highly relevant to well-being, but less useful by patients. Thematic analysis identified six themes: Enjoyment, recovery and well-being, relationships, content, structure and future ideas. Both groups experienced improved mood and increased enjoyment and awareness of well-being. Patient isolation was addressed, and the staff experienced stress reduction and increased productivity. Both groups experienced improved relationships. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychotherapeutic Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa)
Article
Self-Esteem Group: Useful Intervention for Inpatients with Anorexia Nervosa?
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9010012 - 13 Jan 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3705
Abstract
Low self-esteem is a common feature in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) and has been hypothesised to act as a predisposing, precipitating, and perpetuating factor. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)-based self-esteem group in a [...] Read more.
Low self-esteem is a common feature in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) and has been hypothesised to act as a predisposing, precipitating, and perpetuating factor. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)-based self-esteem group in a naturalistic setting of patients with AN in an inpatient treatment programme. Included in this study were 119 female patients diagnosed with AN, with all participants completing self-report questionnaires before and after the intervention. The group consisted of five to six weekly sessions. The self-esteem group led to a statistically significant improvement in self-esteem, which could not be explained by an increase in BMI alone, suggesting that the group is facilitating positive changes within an AN group. The group also had a small effect on improving patients self-perceived ability to change. These findings suggest that the brief self-esteem group has some benefits in improving patients’ self-esteem/self-efficacy and should be replicated in the future with a control condition to confirm findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychotherapeutic Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa)
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