Special Issue "Systems for the Early Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Laurent A. Francis
Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Information and Communication Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics (ICTEAM), Université catholique de Louvain (UCL), Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
Interests: biosensors; microfluidics; harsh environment sensing; atomic layer deposition; thin films; CMOS-MEMS; silicon-on-insulator
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will be dedicated to the rapid detection of bacteria and pathogens. The detection can take place for human or animal bodily fluids, e.g., milk, blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, etc., or for foodborne pathogens. An emphasis will be set to original techniques that can lead to portable devices that are able to selectively detect harmful bacteria in synthetic or complex media and with the fastest detection rate.

Prof. Dr. Laurent A. Francis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bacteria
  • pathogens
  • lab-on-chip
  • label-free transduction
  • impedance
  • acoustic wave sensors
  • optical detection
  • enzymatic detection
  • amino acid sequencing
  • polymerase chain reaction
  • bacteria lysis
  • biofilms
  • whole cell detection
  • Escherichia coli
  • Staphylococcus
  • Streptococcus
  • Enterococcus
  • Neisseria

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
High Bacterial Agglutination Activity in a Single-CRD C-Type Lectin from Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)
Biosensors 2017, 7(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios7010012 - 01 Mar 2017
Cited by 7
Abstract
Lectins are carbohydrate-interacting proteins that play a pivotal role in multiple physiological and developmental aspects of all organisms. They can specifically interact with different bacterial and viral pathogens through carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRD). In addition, lectins are also of biotechnological interest because of their [...] Read more.
Lectins are carbohydrate-interacting proteins that play a pivotal role in multiple physiological and developmental aspects of all organisms. They can specifically interact with different bacterial and viral pathogens through carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRD). In addition, lectins are also of biotechnological interest because of their potential use as biosensors for capturing and identifying bacterial species. In this work, three C-type lectins from the Lepidoptera Spodoptera exigua were produced as recombinant proteins and their bacterial agglutination properties were characterized. The lowest protein concentration producing bacterial agglutination against a panel of different Gram+ and Gram− as well as their carbohydrate binding specificities was determined for the three lectins. One of these lectins, BLL2, was able to agglutinate cells from a broad range of bacterial species at an extremely low concentration, becoming a very interesting protein to be used as a biosensor or for other biotechnological applications involving bacterial capture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systems for the Early Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria)
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Open AccessArticle
Rapid, Portable, Multiplexed Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Directly from Clinical Sample Matrices
Biosensors 2016, 6(4), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6040049 - 23 Sep 2016
Cited by 8
Abstract
Enteric and diarrheal diseases are a major cause of childhood illness and death in countries with developing economies. Each year, more than half of a million children under the age of five die from these diseases. We have developed a portable, microfluidic platform [...] Read more.
Enteric and diarrheal diseases are a major cause of childhood illness and death in countries with developing economies. Each year, more than half of a million children under the age of five die from these diseases. We have developed a portable, microfluidic platform capable of simultaneous, multiplexed detection of several of the bacterial pathogens that cause these diseases. This platform can perform fast, sensitive immunoassays directly from relevant, complex clinical matrices such as stool without extensive sample cleanup or preparation. Using only 1 µL of sample per assay, we demonstrate simultaneous multiplexed detection of four bacterial pathogens implicated in diarrheal and enteric diseases in less than 20 min. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systems for the Early Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria)
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Open AccessArticle
PCR-Independent Detection of Bacterial Species-Specific 16S rRNA at 10 fM by a Pore-Blockage Sensor
Biosensors 2016, 6(3), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6030037 - 22 Jul 2016
Cited by 2
Abstract
A PCR-free, optics-free device is used for the detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) 16S rRNA at 10 fM, which corresponds to ~100–1000 colony forming units/mL (CFU/mL) depending on cellular rRNA levels. The development of a rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective nucleic [...] Read more.
A PCR-free, optics-free device is used for the detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) 16S rRNA at 10 fM, which corresponds to ~100–1000 colony forming units/mL (CFU/mL) depending on cellular rRNA levels. The development of a rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective nucleic acid detection platform is sought for the detection of pathogenic microbes in food, water and body fluids. Since 16S rRNA sequences are species specific and are present at high copy number in viable cells, these nucleic acids offer an attractive target for microbial pathogen detection schemes. Here, target 16S rRNA of E. coli at 10 fM concentration was detected against a total RNA background using a conceptually simple approach based on electromechanical signal transduction, whereby a step change reduction in ionic current through a pore indicates blockage by an electrophoretically mobilized bead-peptide nucleic acid probe conjugate hybridized to target nucleic acid. We investigated the concentration detection limit for bacterial species-specific 16S rRNA at 1 pM to 1 fM and found a limit of detection of 10 fM for our device, which is consistent with our previous finding with single-stranded DNA of similar length. In addition, no false positive responses were obtained with control RNA and no false negatives with target 16S rRNA present down to the limit of detection (LOD) of 10 fM. Thus, this detection scheme shows promise for integration into portable, low-cost systems for rapid detection of pathogenic microbes in food, water and body fluids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Systems for the Early Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria)
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