Special Issue "Advances in Magnetic Particle-Based Bioassays"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensor Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2023 | Viewed by 1436

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Carole Chaix
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut des Sciences Analytiques, UMR 5280 CNRS Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, 69100 Villeurbanne, France
Interests: biosensor; bioconjugate; nanotechnology; interface; electrochemical detection; multidetection; methylene blue; ferrocene; DNA; nanomedicine; nanostructuration; diamond; gold; graphene; multi-functionalization
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The special issue aims to highlight the latest experimental approaches and methods using magnetic particles to develop rapid bioassays for point-of-care diagnostics, agri-food safety or environmental quality control. Applications in the field of nanomedicine are also of great interest.

Magnetic beads are commonly used in bioassays thanks to their easy functionalization by specific biomarkers, and their ability to efficiently capture and pre-concentration targets to be detected from biological fluids or complex matrices. Nowadays, these approaches are increasingly integrated into microfluidic, potentially multiplexable, lab-on-a-chip systems, in order to improve the sensitivity/quantification and specificity of the assays, and to reduce the quantities of samples to be analyzed. Recent advances focus on the development of smaller and more efficient magnetic particles well-adapted to microfluidic systems. The latest applications also concern the use of magnetic beads in screening and extraction methods such as aptamer selection, miRNA pre-concentration or exosome isolation.

The scope of the issue includes innovative approaches using functionalised magnetic micro/nanoparticles based on different biological (e.g., enzymes, antibodies, nucleic acids, tissues, organelles, etc.), and (bio)synthetic (e.g., peptides, molecularly imprinted polymers, affimers, oligonucleotides, aptamers, etc.) materials. A wide range of biosensing methods are applicable (e.g., optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric, thermometric, micromechanical, magnetoresistive, etc.). Research dedicated to the development of hybrid or more performant magnetic nanomaterials as well as innovative surface chemistries for biofunctionalization are encouraged. All bioanalytical applications are considered, with a particular interest for bioassays adapted to portable and cost-effective devices. In summary, this issue focuses on innovative technologies and up-to-date methods using magnetic particles which help advance science in the bioanalytical field.

Dr. Carole Chaix
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • magnetic particle
  • bioassay
  • biosensing
  • bioanalysis
  • point-of-care diagnostics
  • agri-food
  • environmental monitoring
  • rapid test
  • biofunctionalization
  • nanoparticle surface chemistry
  • magnetic extraction

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Electrochemical Sensing Platform Using Ferrocene-Labelled Peptide Nucleic Acid for the Early Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer
Biosensors 2022, 12(9), 736; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12090736 - 07 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 713
Abstract
Diagnostic biomarkers based on epigenetic changes such as DNA methylation are promising tools for early cancer diagnosis. However, there are significant difficulties in directly and specifically detecting methylated DNA regions. Here, we report an electrochemical sensing system based on magnetic nanoparticles that enable [...] Read more.
Diagnostic biomarkers based on epigenetic changes such as DNA methylation are promising tools for early cancer diagnosis. However, there are significant difficulties in directly and specifically detecting methylated DNA regions. Here, we report an electrochemical sensing system based on magnetic nanoparticles that enable a quantitative and selective analysis of the methylated septin9 (mSEPT9) gene, which is considered a diagnostic marker in early stage colorectal cancer (CRC). Methylation levels of SEPT9 in CRC samples were successfully followed by the selective recognition ability of a related peptide nucleic acid (PNA) after hybridization with DNA fragments in human patients’ serums and plasma (n = 10). Moreover, this system was also adapted into a point-of-care (POC) device for a one-step detection platform. The detection of mSEPT9 demonstrated a limit of detection (LOD) value of 0.37% and interference-free measurement in the presence of branched-chain amino acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1) and SRY box transcription factor 21 antisense divergent transcript 1 (SOX21-AS1). The currently proposed functional platform has substantial prospects in translational applications of early CRC detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Magnetic Particle-Based Bioassays)
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Review

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Review
Overview on the Design of Magnetically Assisted Electrochemical Biosensors
Biosensors 2022, 12(11), 954; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12110954 - 01 Nov 2022
Viewed by 353
Abstract
Electrochemical biosensors generally require the immobilization of recognition elements or capture probes on the electrode surface. This may limit their practical applications due to the complex operation procedure and low repeatability and stability. Magnetically assisted biosensors show remarkable advantages in separation and pre-concentration [...] Read more.
Electrochemical biosensors generally require the immobilization of recognition elements or capture probes on the electrode surface. This may limit their practical applications due to the complex operation procedure and low repeatability and stability. Magnetically assisted biosensors show remarkable advantages in separation and pre-concentration of targets from complex biological samples. More importantly, magnetically assisted sensing systems show high throughput since the magnetic materials can be produced and preserved on a large scale. In this work, we summarized the design of electrochemical biosensors involving magnetic materials as the platforms for recognition reaction and target conversion. The recognition reactions usually include antigen–antibody, DNA hybridization, and aptamer–target interactions. By conjugating an electroactive probe to biomolecules attached to magnetic materials, the complexes can be accumulated near to an electrode surface with the aid of external magnet field, producing an easily measurable redox current. The redox current can be further enhanced by enzymes, nanomaterials, DNA assemblies, and thermal-cycle or isothermal amplification. In magnetically assisted assays, the magnetic substrates are removed by a magnet after the target conversion, and the signal can be monitored through stimuli–response release of signal reporters, enzymatic production of electroactive species, or target-induced generation of messenger DNA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Magnetic Particle-Based Bioassays)
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