Special Issue "Advances in Lab-on-Chip Devices"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Domenico Caputo
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Information Engineering, Electronics and Telecommunications, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, via Eudossiana, 18, 00184 Rome, Italy
Interests: electronic devices, photosensors, electronics for photosensors, lab-on-chip, microfluidics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will be dedicated to the advances in lab-on-chip technologies and applications. Technologies focused on thin film devices (based on organic and inorganic materials) and label free detection (electrochemical, optical, etc.) will be highly appreciated. Design and fabrication of microfluidic networks are welcomed. Recognition methods based on antibodies, aptamers, quantum dots, graphene and nanoparticles could be addressed.

Applications regarding development of point-of-care devices, devices for agro-food analysis, and for DNA amplification are welcomed.

Prof. Dr. Domenico Caputo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lab-on-chip
  • point-of-care devices
  • agro-food analysis
  • DNA amplification
  • thin film device
  • label free-detection
  • biomolecular recognition
  • microfluidic networks

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Alternating Current-Dielectrophoresis Collection and Chaining of Phytoplankton on Chip: Comparison of Individual Species and Artificial Communities
Biosensors 2017, 7(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios7010004 - 05 Jan 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
The capability of alternating current (AC) dielectrophoresis (DEP) for on-chip capture and chaining of the three species representative of freshwater phytoplankton was evaluated. The effects of the AC field intensity, frequency and duration on the chaining efficiency and chain lengths of green alga [...] Read more.
The capability of alternating current (AC) dielectrophoresis (DEP) for on-chip capture and chaining of the three species representative of freshwater phytoplankton was evaluated. The effects of the AC field intensity, frequency and duration on the chaining efficiency and chain lengths of green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. and diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana were characterized systematically. C. reinhardtii showed an increase of the chaining efficiency from 100 Hz to 500 kHz at all field intensities; C. meneghiniana presented a decrease of chaining efficiency from 100 Hz to 1 kHz followed by a significant increase from 1 kHz to 500 kHz, while Synechocystis sp. exhibited low chaining tendency at all frequencies and all field intensities. The experimentally-determined DEP response and cell alignment of each microorganism were in agreement with their effective polarizability. Mixtures of cells in equal proportion or 10-times excess of Synechocystis sp. showed important differences in terms of chaining efficiency and length of the chains compared with the results obtained when the cells were alone in suspension. While a constant degree of chaining was observed with the mixture of C. reinhardtii and C. meneghiniana, the presence of Synechocystis sp. in each mixture suppressed the formation of chains for the two other phytoplankton species. All of these results prove the potential of DEP to discriminate different phytoplankton species depending on their effective polarizability and to enable their manipulation, such as specific collection or separation in freshwater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Lab-on-Chip Devices)
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Open AccessArticle
Semi-Quantitative Method for Streptococci Magnetic Detection in Raw Milk
Biosensors 2016, 6(2), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6020019 - 27 Apr 2016
Cited by 15
Abstract
Bovine mastitis is the most costly disease for dairy farmers and the most frequent reason for the use of antibiotics in dairy cattle; thus, control measures to detect and prevent mastitis are crucial for dairy farm sustainability. The aim of this study was [...] Read more.
Bovine mastitis is the most costly disease for dairy farmers and the most frequent reason for the use of antibiotics in dairy cattle; thus, control measures to detect and prevent mastitis are crucial for dairy farm sustainability. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a sensitive method to magnetically detect Streptococcus agalactiae (a Group B streptococci) and Streptococcus uberis in raw milk samples. Mastitic milk samples were collected aseptically from 44 cows with subclinical mastitis, from 11 Portuguese dairy farms. Forty-six quarter milk samples were selected based on bacterial identification by conventional microbiology. All samples were submitted to PCR analysis. In parallel, these milk samples were mixed with a solution combining specific antibodies and magnetic nanoparticles, to be analyzed using a lab-on-a-chip magnetoresistive cytometer, with microfluidic sample handling. This paper describes a point of care methodology used for detection of bacteria, including analysis of false positive/negative results. This immunological recognition was able to detect bacterial presence in samples spiked above 100 cfu/mL, independently of antibody and targeted bacteria used in this work. Using PCR as a reference, this method correctly identified 73% of positive samples for streptococci species with an anti-S. agalactiae antibody, and 41% of positive samples for an anti-GB streptococci antibody. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Lab-on-Chip Devices)
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Open AccessArticle
Sensing of Salivary Glucose Using Nano-Structured Biosensors
Biosensors 2016, 6(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6010010 - 17 Mar 2016
Cited by 20
Abstract
The anxiety and pain associated with frequent finger pricking has always been troublesome for diabetics measuring blood glucose (BG) in their daily lives. For this reason, a reliable glucose monitoring system that allows noninvasive measurements is highly desirable. Our main objective is to [...] Read more.
The anxiety and pain associated with frequent finger pricking has always been troublesome for diabetics measuring blood glucose (BG) in their daily lives. For this reason, a reliable glucose monitoring system that allows noninvasive measurements is highly desirable. Our main objective is to develop a biosensor that can detect low-level glucose in saliva (physiological range 0.5–20 mg/dL). Salivary glucose (SG) sensors were built using a layer-by-layer self-assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes, chitosan, gold nanoparticles, and glucose oxidase onto a screen-printed platinum electrode. An electrochemical method was utilized for the quantitative detection of glucose in both buffer solution and saliva samples. A standard spectrophotometric technique was used as a reference method to validate the glucose content of each sample. The disposable glucose sensors have a detection limit of 0.41 mg/dL, a sensitivity of 0.24 μA·s·dL·mg−1, a linear range of 0.5–20 mg/dL in buffer solution, and a response time of 30 s. A study of 10 healthy subjects was conducted, and SG levels between 1.1 to 10.1 mg/dL were successfully detected. The results revealed that the noninvasive SG monitoring could be an alternative for diabetes self-management at home. This paper is not intended to replace regular BG tests, but to study SG itself as an indicator for the quality of diabetes care. It can potentially help patients control and monitor their health conditions, enabling them to comply with prescribed treatments for diabetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Lab-on-Chip Devices)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Microfluidic Devices for Forensic DNA Analysis: A Review
Biosensors 2016, 6(3), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6030041 - 05 Aug 2016
Cited by 33
Abstract
Microfluidic devices may offer various advantages for forensic DNA analysis, such as reduced risk of contamination, shorter analysis time and direct application at the crime scene. Microfluidic chip technology has already proven to be functional and effective within medical applications, such as for [...] Read more.
Microfluidic devices may offer various advantages for forensic DNA analysis, such as reduced risk of contamination, shorter analysis time and direct application at the crime scene. Microfluidic chip technology has already proven to be functional and effective within medical applications, such as for point-of-care use. In the forensic field, one may expect microfluidic technology to become particularly relevant for the analysis of biological traces containing human DNA. This would require a number of consecutive steps, including sample work up, DNA amplification and detection, as well as secure storage of the sample. This article provides an extensive overview of microfluidic devices for cell lysis, DNA extraction and purification, DNA amplification and detection and analysis techniques for DNA. Topics to be discussed are polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on-chip, digital PCR (dPCR), isothermal amplification on-chip, chip materials, integrated devices and commercially available techniques. A critical overview of the opportunities and challenges of the use of chips is discussed, and developments made in forensic DNA analysis over the past 10–20 years with microfluidic systems are described. Areas in which further research is needed are indicated in a future outlook. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Lab-on-Chip Devices)
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