Special Issue "Microfluidics for Biosensing and Diagnostics"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. David W. Inglis

School of Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: microfluidics for cell and particle separation; microfluidic physics; nanofluidics; biophotonics
Guest Editor
Dr. Majid Ebrahimi Warkiani

School of Biomedical Engineering, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney NSW 2007, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: microfluidics; organ-on-a-chip
Guest Editor
Dr. Mohammad A. Qasaimeh

Division of Engineering, New York University Abu Dhabi, UAE
Tandon School of Engineering, New York University, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: microfluidics; biomedical micro-devices; point of care diagnostics; cancer; blood
Guest Editor
Dr. Weiqiang Chen

Tandon School of Engineering, New York University, Brooklyn, NY 11201, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: microfluidics; organ-on-a-chip; biosensing; cancer; immune engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite contributions to this Special Issue covering biologically relevant sensing and diagnostics with micro-scale fluidic structures. Efforts to miniaturize sensing and diagnostic devices and to integrate multiple functions into one device have caused massive growth in the field of microfluidics. This has been apparent in the volume of papers in the more recent success of many commercial devices.

The field of microfluidics is exceptionally diverse. It attracts interest and contributions from physicists, chemists and biologists, as well as electrical, mechanical, chemical, and biomedical engineers. Working in such a diverse community poses many challenges arising from different training, different terminology, and different standards and expectations for data.  However, if we can overcome these pedantic differences, and communicate effectively, we may achieve great things.

With this in mind we invite contributions to this special issue from as broad a community as possible.  The list of potential topics is vast, but we are particularly interested in work that elucidates how some physical or chemical phenomena is leveraged by microfluidics to improve or enable a biosensing or diagnostic application.

We will look for scientifically sound work that is presented in clear, concise, and simple writing. The work should be thoughtfully analyzed and written for the diverse microfluidics community.

Dr. David W. Inglis
Dr. Majid Ebrahimi Warkiani
Dr. Mohammad A. Qasaimeh
Dr. Weiqiang Chen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 650 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 3D Printing
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Bioconjugation
  • Electrochemical
  • Enzyme
  • Fabrication
  • Field effect transistor
  • Lab-on-chip
  • Lab-on-disk
  • Limit of detection
  • Non-specific binding
  • Point of care
  • Paper-based microfluidics
  • Sensing
  • Separation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Integrated Microfluidic Devices Fabricated in Poly (Methyl Methacrylate) (PMMA) for On-site Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Aminoglycosides in Whole Blood
Biosensors 2019, 9(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9010019
Received: 21 November 2018 / Revised: 18 December 2018 / Accepted: 19 December 2018 / Published: 30 January 2019
PDF Full-text (1578 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
On-site therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is important for providing a quick and accurate dosing to patients in order to improve efficacy and minimize toxicity. Aminoglycosides such as amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin are important antibiotics that have been commonly used to treat infections of [...] Read more.
On-site therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is important for providing a quick and accurate dosing to patients in order to improve efficacy and minimize toxicity. Aminoglycosides such as amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin are important antibiotics that have been commonly used to treat infections of chronic bacterial infections in the urinary tract, lung, and heart. However, these aminoglycosides can lead to vestibular and auditory dysfunction. Therefore, TDM of aminoglycosides is important due to their ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Here, we have developed a hot embossed poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic device featuring an electrokinetic size and mobility trap (SMT) to purify, concentrate, and separate the aminoglycoside antibiotic drugs amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin. These drugs were separated successfully from whole blood within 3 min, with 30-fold lower detection limits compared to a standard pinched injection. The limit of detections (LOD) were 3.75 µg/mL for gentamicin, 8.53 µg/mL for amikacin, and 6.00 µg/mL for tobramycin. These are sufficient to cover the therapeutic range for treating sepsis of 6–10 μg/mL gentamicin and tobramycin and 12–20 μg/mL of amikacin. The device is simple and could be mass produced via embossing or injection molding approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microfluidics for Biosensing and Diagnostics)
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