Special Issue "Electronic Noses for Biomedical Applications and Environmental Monitoring II"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors and Healthcare".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jesus Lozano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Escuela de Ingenierías Industriales. Universidad de Extremadura. Av. Elvas s/n. Badajoz, Spain
Interests: chemical sensors; biosensors; electronic intrumentation; pattern recognition; machine learning; electronic nose technology; Internet of Things
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Electronic noses are bioinspired instruments that mimic the biological sense of smell. They are based on the use of gas sensors or biosensors combined with pattern recognition methods. Both topics have experienced great advances in the last few years: Chemical sensors have improved their metrological parameters, such as the limit of detection, the linearity of the response signal, sensitivity, selectivity, response time, and repeatability, while the second topic involves the development of advanced embedded or remote signal and data analysis techniques, including big data and cloud computing. One of the main advantages of the use of electronic noses is their reduced cost, size, and the fact that they are easy to use, compared to traditional measurement systems, without the need for prior separation of the particular components of a gaseous mixture, which significantly reduces the time for a single analysis. For these reasons, the area of possible applications of electronic olfaction has been increasing over time. This Special Issue is devoted to the most recent technical developments in the area of electronic nose technology, including their design, the chemical sensors and biosensors used, instrumentation systems for laboratory or field monitoring, personal systems and wearables, innovative data processing techniques, and also their implementation, in particular for biomedical applications and environmental monitoring.

Scope of the Special Issue:

  • New sensor solutions applied in electronic noses;
  • Nanotechnology and novel materials applied to gas sensors and biosensors;
  • Novel instrumentation systems for electronic noses;
  • New methodology approaches in the use of advanced data processing methods;
  • Correction and compensation of sensor drift and humidity and other effects;
  • Application of electronic noses in biomedical applications;
  • Application of electronic noses in environmental monitoring,

This Special Issue aims to highlight the most recent advances of electronic noses for biomedical applications and environmental monitoring. Reviews and original research papers are all welcome.

Dr. Jesus Lozano
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Chemical sensor
  • Biosensor
  • Nanotechnology
  • Data processing techniques
  • Volatile organic compounds

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Detection of Lethal Bronzing Disease in Cabbage Palms (Sabal palmetto) Using a Low-Cost Electronic Nose
Biosensors 2020, 10(11), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10110188 - 23 Nov 2020
Viewed by 736
Abstract
Lethal Bronzing Disease (LB) is a disease of palms caused by the 16SrIV-D phytoplasma. A low-cost electronic nose (eNose) prototype was trialed for its detection. It includes an array of eight Taguchi-type (MQ) sensors (MQ135, MQ2, MQ3, MQ4, MQ5, MQ9, MQ7, and MQ8) [...] Read more.
Lethal Bronzing Disease (LB) is a disease of palms caused by the 16SrIV-D phytoplasma. A low-cost electronic nose (eNose) prototype was trialed for its detection. It includes an array of eight Taguchi-type (MQ) sensors (MQ135, MQ2, MQ3, MQ4, MQ5, MQ9, MQ7, and MQ8) controlled by an Arduino NANO® microcontroller, using heater voltages that vary sinusoidally over a 2.5 min cycle. Samples of uninfected, early symptomatic, moderate symptomatic, and late symptomatic infected palm leaves of the cabbage palm were processed and analyzed. MQ sensor responses were subjected to a 256 element discrete Fourier transform (DFT), and harmonic component amplitudes were reviewed by principal component analysis (PCA). The experiment was repeated three times, each showing clear evidence of differences in sensor responses between the samples of uninfected leaves and those in the early stages of infection. Within each experiment, four groups of responses were identified, demonstrating the ability of the unit to repeatedly distinguish healthy leaves from diseased ones; however, detection of the severity of infection has not been demonstrated. By selecting appropriate coefficients (here demonstrated with plots of MQ5 Cos1 vs. MQ8 Sin3), it should be possible to build a ruleset classifier to identify healthy and unhealthy samples. Full article
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Review

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Review
The Role of Electronic Noses in Phenotyping Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Biosensors 2020, 10(11), 171; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10110171 - 11 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1071
Abstract
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common progressive disorder of the respiratory system which is currently the third leading cause of death worldwide. Exhaled breath analysis is a non-invasive method to study lung diseases, and electronic noses have been extensively used in [...] Read more.
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common progressive disorder of the respiratory system which is currently the third leading cause of death worldwide. Exhaled breath analysis is a non-invasive method to study lung diseases, and electronic noses have been extensively used in breath research. Studies with electronic noses have proved that the pattern of exhaled volatile organic compounds is different in COPD. More recent investigations have reported that electronic noses could potentially distinguish different endotypes (i.e., neutrophilic vs. eosinophilic) and are able to detect microorganisms in the airways responsible for exacerbations. This article will review the published literature on electronic noses and COPD and help in identifying methodological, physiological, and disease-related factors which could affect the results. Full article
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Review
Electronic Nose as a Novel Method for Diagnosing Cancer: A Systematic Review
Biosensors 2020, 10(8), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10080084 - 25 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1930
Abstract
Cancer is fast becoming the most important cause of death worldwide, its mortality being mostly caused by late or wrong diagnosis. Novel strategies have been developed to identify early signs of cancer in a minimally obtrusive way, including the Electronic Nose (E-Nose) technology, [...] Read more.
Cancer is fast becoming the most important cause of death worldwide, its mortality being mostly caused by late or wrong diagnosis. Novel strategies have been developed to identify early signs of cancer in a minimally obtrusive way, including the Electronic Nose (E-Nose) technology, user-friendly, cost- and time-saving alternative to classical approaches. This systematic review, conducted under the PRISMA guidelines, identified 60 articles directly dealing with the E-Nose application in cancer research published up to 31 January 2020. Among these works, the vast majority reported successful E-Nose use for diagnosing Lung Cancer, showing promising results especially when employing the Aeonose tool, discriminating subjects with Lung Cancer from controls in more than 80% of individuals, in most studies. In order to tailor the main limitations of the proposed approach, including the application of the protocol to advanced stage of cancer, sample heterogeneity and massive confounders, future studies should be conducted on early stage patients, and on larger cohorts, as to better characterize the specific breathprint associated with the various subtypes of cancer. This would ultimately lead to a better and faster diagnosis and to earlier treatment, possibly reducing the burden associated to such conditions. Full article
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