3D Bioprinting for Biomedicine

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 July 2022) | Viewed by 4330

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Division of Chemical Engineering, Department of Materials Engineering Science, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531, Japan
Interests: tissue engineering; regenerative medicine; bioprinting; enzymatic hydrogelation; polysaccharide; hydrogel; drug delivery; cancer model
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

3D bioprinting is an innovative technology in the field of biomedicine. This technology is believed to enable the fabrication of more-functional tissues compared to those prepared by conventional techniques. The expression of cellular functions, such as proliferation, migration, and differentiation, in the fabricated constructs, are greatly affected by the surrounding environment of the cells.  

This Special Issue, 3D Bioprinting for Biomedicine, will be focused on the advances related to biomolecules, e.g., proteins, polysaccharides, and extracellular matrices, in bioinks, for the fabrication of functional tissues. We welcome both research and review articles about bioprinting using bioinks that actively influence cellular functions, the development of novel biomolecules for bioprinting, and the development of novel bioprinting techniques that are suitable for promising biomolecules.

Prof. Dr. Shinji Sakai
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomolecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • bioprinting
  • biomedicine
  • regenerative medicine
  • tissue engineering
  • 3D printing

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 2119 KiB  
Article
Freeform 3D Bioprinting Involving Ink Gelation by Cascade Reaction of Oxidase and Peroxidase: A Feasibility Study Using Hyaluronic Acid-Based Ink
by Shinji Sakai, Ryohei Harada and Takashi Kotani
Biomolecules 2021, 11(12), 1908; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom11121908 - 20 Dec 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3809
Abstract
Freeform bioprinting, realized by extruding ink-containing cells into supporting materials to provide physical support during printing, has fostered significant advances toward the fabrication of cell-laden soft hydrogel constructs with desired spatial control. For further advancement of freeform bioprinting, we aimed to propose a [...] Read more.
Freeform bioprinting, realized by extruding ink-containing cells into supporting materials to provide physical support during printing, has fostered significant advances toward the fabrication of cell-laden soft hydrogel constructs with desired spatial control. For further advancement of freeform bioprinting, we aimed to propose a method in which the ink embedded in supporting materials gelate through a cytocompatible and rapid cascade reaction between oxidase and peroxidase. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method, we extruded ink containing choline, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and a hyaluronic acid derivative, cross-linkable by HRP-catalyzed reaction, into a supporting material containing choline oxidase and successfully obtained three-dimensional hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel constructs with good shape fidelity to blueprints. Cytocompatibility of the bioprinting method was confirmed by the comparable growth of mouse fibroblast cells, released from the printed hydrogels through degradation on cell culture dishes, with those not exposed to the printing process, and considering more than 85% viability of the enclosed cells during 10 days of culture. Owing to the presence of derivatives of the various biocompatible polymers that are cross-linkable through HRP-mediated cross-linking, our results demonstrate that the novel 3D bioprinting method has great potential in tissue engineering applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Bioprinting for Biomedicine)
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