Special Issue "Biomimetic Restorative Dentistry"

A special issue of Biomimetics (ISSN 2313-7673).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. David Alleman
Website
Guest Editor
Alleman–Deliperi Centers for Biomimetic Dentistry
Interests: maintaining pulp vitality in decayed and cracked teeth; fiber-composite dental applications
Dr. Simone Delpieri

Guest Editor
1. Tufts University, School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
2. Alleman–Deliperi Centers for Biomimetic Dentistry
Interests: stress reducing direct composite techniques; fiber-composite dental applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The philosophy of "looking at the natural tooth" has inspired a new type of restorative dentistry. This biomimetic approach differs from and is superior to the traditional mechanical restorative dental approach that has been taught to dentists for over 200 years. Biomimetic dentistry is a true paradigm shift in the world of restorative dentistry. The techniques have evolved from adhesive composite resin technology that began in the late 1970s. The ability to increase the bond strength of restorative material to the natural tooth has led to the preservation of pulp vitality, the conservation of tooth structure, and the limiting of the need for future re-treatments. These are the overriding goals of these new protocols. This Special Issue aims to provide proof-of-concept of the biomimetic approach in restorative dentistry. We encourage researchers across disciplines to contribute to the development of this emerging, growing field by submitting relevant research, case studies, comprehensive review articles. With this Special Issue, we would also like to encourage professionals and practitioners involved in the education of dentists to embrace this new and better way to "fix teeth" so they can perform like natural teeth.

Dr. David Alleman
Dr. Simone Delpieri
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomimetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • tooth conservation
  • pulp vitality
  • hybrid layer
  • strength of teeth
  • operative dental procedures
  • dental crack syndrome
  • hydrodynamic theory of dental pain
  • polymerization shrinkage of composites
  • modulus of elasticity of enamel
  • modulus of elasticity of dentin
  • cohesive strength of enamel
  • cohesive strength of dentin
  • cohesive strength of dentino-enamel complex
  • adhesive dentistry
  • biomimetic dentistry
  • caries removal
  • indirect pulp capping
  • matrix metalloproteinases
  • remineralization of teeth
  • immediate dentin sealing
  • resin coating
  • dentin bonding systems
  • flowable composites
  • stress reduction
  • minimally invasive dentistry
  • air-abrasion
  • C-factor
  • fiber nets
  • fiber composites
  • deep margin elevation
  • semi-direct restoration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Non-Vital Bleaching on the Durability of Resin–Dentin Bond with an Ethanol-Based Etch-And-Rinse Adhesive
Biomimetics 2018, 3(4), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics3040035 - 06 Nov 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
To evaluate the bleaching procedure and application of sodium ascorbate on dentin bond durability, the enamel surface of intact human third molars (n = 18) were removed, and the teeth were randomly divided into two groups for immediate and six-month bond strength [...] Read more.
To evaluate the bleaching procedure and application of sodium ascorbate on dentin bond durability, the enamel surface of intact human third molars (n = 18) were removed, and the teeth were randomly divided into two groups for immediate and six-month bond strength evaluation. The specimens were further assigned into three subgroups according to treatment procedure, as follows: subgroup A, no bleaching (positive control) was performed prior to the etch-and-rinse bonding with single bond and subsequent build-up with Z250 composite; subgroup B, the samples were bleached with 20% carbamide peroxide 6 h/day for five consecutive days prior to bonding; and subgroup C, bleaching was performed as in subgroup B, after which 10% sodium ascorbate was applied on dentin surface for 10 min before the bonding procedures. A microtensile bond strength test was performed and the failure modes were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post-hoc tests with a level of significance of 0.05. Bleaching significantly decreased the immediate and six-month bond strength. The application of sodium ascorbate had no significant effect on the immediate and six-month bond strength of bleached specimens. We conclude that the bleaching procedure may decrease the durability of the resin–dentin bond of the tested etch-and-rinse adhesive. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Restorative Dentistry)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of the Time of Salivary Contamination during Light Curing on Degree of Conversion and Microhardness of a Restorative Composite Resin
Biomimetics 2018, 3(3), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics3030023 - 22 Aug 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Saliva contamination is a major clinical problem in restorative procedures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the time of salivary contamination during light curing on the degree of conversion and the microhardness of a restorative composite resin. Eight [...] Read more.
Saliva contamination is a major clinical problem in restorative procedures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the time of salivary contamination during light curing on the degree of conversion and the microhardness of a restorative composite resin. Eight groups of 10 samples for measuring the microhardness and eight groups of 5 samples for evaluating the degree of conversion were prepared. The samples of each group were contaminated with human saliva at a certain time. The first group (T0) was contaminated before light curing. The specimens in groups T2–T30 were contaminated at 2, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 s after the start of light curing, respectively. The samples of group T40 were contaminated after light curing. The degree of conversion and the microhardness of the specimens were measured by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Vickers hardness testing techniques, respectively. The results of this study revealed that there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of the degree of conversion of the composite resin. Consistent with the findings for the degree of conversion, significant differences in the microhardness between the groups were not found. In conclusion, from a clinical point of view, the results of our study showed that the time of salivary contamination (before, during or after light curing of composite resin) has no significant effect on the polymerization (degree of conversion) and one of the important mechanical properties of dental composite resins (microhardness). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Restorative Dentistry)
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