Special Issue "Bone Cells and Related Interactions"

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jessika Bertacchini
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena 41125, Italy
Interests: osteocytes signaling; skeletal/muscle disorders; signal transduction; PI3K/Akt/mTor pathway; hematological diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue is focused on the relationships between bone and surrounding tissues/systems.

Each bone is an organ (i.e., a multi-tissue entity) that includes connective tissues (cartilage, adipose, blood), nervous tissue, and muscular tissue. Bony skeleton performs both mechanical and metabolic functions, as endoskeleton, it provides a protective and structural framework for the body, since it supplies structural support, protection of soft tissue organs and attachments for muscles. Though bones perform these functions, they are dynamic organs, constantly remodeling, under mechanical and metabolic demands. Moreover, bone tissue contains bone marrow, responsible for stem cell differentiation and blood cell production, and serves as an important store house of minerals. Often, all these aspects are functionally correlated and interfere with each other, by sharing sophisticated signaling pathways. In the last decade, there has been a fair bit of molecular and cellular research done on bone physiology, bone remodeling, bone regeneration and the pathophysiology of bone diseases, such as osteoporosis. Knowledge of the cross talk between bone and other tissues could be translated to potential clinical and pre-clinical investigations. Authors are invited to submit original or review articles concerning bone cells related interactions contributing to the understanding of bone biology, bone regeneration and bone pathology.

Dr. Jessika Bertacchini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomedicines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • Bone biology
  • bone regeneration
  • bone related interactions
  • signaling mechanisms
  • bone diseases and related pathologies

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Proposal of a Novel Natural Biomaterial, the Scleral Ossicle, for the Development of Vascularized Bone Tissue In Vitro
Biomedicines 2018, 6(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines6010003 - 25 Dec 2017
Cited by 2
Abstract
Recovering of significant skeletal defects could be partially abortive due to the perturbations that affect the regenerative process when defects reach a critical size, thus resulting in a non-healed bone. The current standard treatments include allografting, autografting, and other bone implant techniques. However, [...] Read more.
Recovering of significant skeletal defects could be partially abortive due to the perturbations that affect the regenerative process when defects reach a critical size, thus resulting in a non-healed bone. The current standard treatments include allografting, autografting, and other bone implant techniques. However, although they are commonly used in orthopedic surgery, these treatments have some limitations concerning their costs and their side effects such as potential infections or malunions. On this account, the need for suitable constructs to fill the gap in wide fractures is still urgent. As an innovative solution, scleral ossicles (SOs) can be put forward as natural scaffolds for bone repair. SOs are peculiar bony plates forming a ring at the scleral-corneal border of the eyeball of lower vertebrates. In the preliminary phases of the study, these ossicles were structurally and functionally characterized. The morphological characterization was performed by SEM analysis, MicroCT analysis and optical profilometry. Then, UV sterilization was carried out to obtain a clean support, without neither contaminations nor modifications of the bone architecture. Subsequently, the SO biocompatibility was tested in culture with different cell lines, focusing the attention to the differentiation capability of endothelial and osteoblastic cells on the SO surface. The results obtained by the above mentioned analysis strongly suggest that SOs can be used as bio-scaffolds for functionalization processes, useful in regenerative medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bone Cells and Related Interactions)
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Open AccessArticle
Quality Assessment of Platelet-Rich Fibrin-Like Matrix Prepared from Whole Blood Samples after Extended Storage
Biomedicines 2017, 5(3), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines5030057 - 18 Sep 2017
Cited by 8
Abstract
The platelet-rich fibrin–like matrix (PRFM) is usually prepared onsite and immediately used for regenerative therapy. Nonetheless, to meet the clinical necessity of preserving the PRFM without quality deterioration, we developed a method for preparation of PRFMs from short-term-stored whole blood (WB) samples. In [...] Read more.
The platelet-rich fibrin–like matrix (PRFM) is usually prepared onsite and immediately used for regenerative therapy. Nonetheless, to meet the clinical necessity of preserving the PRFM without quality deterioration, we developed a method for preparation of PRFMs from short-term-stored whole blood (WB) samples. In this study, to evaluate the practical expiration date of storage, we extended the storage time of WB samples from 2 to 7 days and assessed the quality of the resulting PRFMs. WB samples collected with acid-citrate-dextrose were stored with gentle agitation at ambient temperature. To prepare PRFMs, the stored WB samples were mixed with CaCl2 in glass tubes and centrifuged. Fibrin fiber networks, CD41 and CD62P expression, and Platelet Derived Growth Factor-BB (PDGF-BB) levels were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), flow cytometry, and an Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA), respectively. Long-term storage had no significant effect on either blood cell counts or platelet functions tested. The resulting PRFMs were visually identical to freshly prepared ones. PDGF-BB levels did not markedly decrease in a time-dependent manner. However, fibrin fibers gradually became thinner after storage. Although the coagulation activity may diminish, we propose that PRFMs can be prepared—without evident loss of quality—from WB samples stored for up to 7 days by our previously developed method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bone Cells and Related Interactions)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Biocompatibility Analyses of Al2O3-Treated Titanium Plates Tested with Osteocyte and Fibroblast Cell Lines
Biomedicines 2017, 5(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines5020032 - 16 Jun 2017
Cited by 2
Abstract
Osseointegration of a titanium implant is still an issue in dental/orthopedic implants durable over time. The good integration of these implants is mainly due to their surface and topography. We obtained an innovative titanium surface by shooting different-in-size particles of Al2O [...] Read more.
Osseointegration of a titanium implant is still an issue in dental/orthopedic implants durable over time. The good integration of these implants is mainly due to their surface and topography. We obtained an innovative titanium surface by shooting different-in-size particles of Al2O3 against the titanium scaffolds which seems to be ideal for bone integration. To corroborate that, we used two different cell lines: MLO-Y4 (murine osteocytes) and 293 (human fibroblasts) and tested the titanium scaffolds untreated and treated (i.e., Al2O3 shot-peened titanium surfaces). Distribution, density, and expression of adhesion molecules (fibronectin and vitronectin) were evaluated under scanning electron microscope (SEM) and confocal microscope (CM). DAPI and fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies were used to highlight nuclei, fibronectin, and vitronectin, under CM; cell distribution was analyzed after gold-palladium sputtering of samples by SEM. The engineered biomaterial surfaces showed under SEM irregular morphology displaying variously-shaped spicules. Both SEM and CM observations showed better outcome in terms of cell adhesion and distribution in treated titanium surfaces with respect to the untreated ones. The results obtained clearly showed that this kind of surface-treated titanium, used to manufacture devices for dental implantology: (i) is very suitable for cell colonization, essential prerequisite for the best osseointegration, and (ii) represents an excellent solution for the development of further engineered implants with the target to obtain recovery of stable dental function over time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bone Cells and Related Interactions)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Muscle–Bone Crosstalk: Emerging Opportunities for Novel Therapeutic Approaches to Treat Musculoskeletal Pathologies
Biomedicines 2017, 5(4), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines5040062 - 24 Oct 2017
Cited by 17
Abstract
Osteoporosis and sarcopenia are age-related musculoskeletal pathologies that often develop in parallel. Osteoporosis is characterized by a reduced bone mass and an increased fracture risk. Sarcopenia describes muscle wasting with an increasing risk of injuries due to falls. The medical treatment of both [...] Read more.
Osteoporosis and sarcopenia are age-related musculoskeletal pathologies that often develop in parallel. Osteoporosis is characterized by a reduced bone mass and an increased fracture risk. Sarcopenia describes muscle wasting with an increasing risk of injuries due to falls. The medical treatment of both diseases costs billions in health care per year. With the impact on public health and economy, and considering the increasing life expectancy of populations, more efficient treatment regimens are sought. The biomechanical interaction between both tissues with muscle acting on bone is well established. Recently, both tissues were also determined as secretory endocrine organs affecting the function of one another. New exciting discoveries on this front are made each year, with novel signaling molecules being discovered and potential controversies being described. While this review does not claim completeness, it will summarize the current knowledge on both the biomechanical and the biochemical link between muscle and bone. The review will highlight the known secreted molecules by both tissues affecting the other and finish with an outlook on novel therapeutics that could emerge from these discoveries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bone Cells and Related Interactions)
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