Biofilms in Wounds: New Advances in Therapy and in Healing Management

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular and Translational Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020) | Viewed by 26451

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Associate Laboratory i4HB—Institute for Health and Bioeconomy, University Institute of Health Sciences—CESPU, 4585-116 Gandra, Portugal
2. ALiCE—Associate Laboratory in Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, LEPABE—Laboratory for Process Engineering, Environment, Biotechnology and Energy, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
Interests: biofilms; Candida; AMR; fungal infection; polymicrobial biofilms; alternatives to antifungals
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Guest Editor
Institute of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology, Savitribai Phule Pune University (University of Pune), Ganeshkhind Rd, Ganeshkhind, Pune, Maharashtra 411007, India
Interests: wounds; biofilms; human-relevant; animal alternatives; polymicrobial

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Co-Guest Editor
Biology Department, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY 13902, USA
Interests: biofilm development, biofilm dispersion, bacterial signaling, outer membrane vesicles, virulence and pathogenesis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biofilm is the predominant mode of life for bacteria and yeasts and is presently implicated in numerous human diseases. In fact, the majority of non-healing wounds contain biofilms, contributing to the high global cost of chronic wounds. Non-healing wounds with biofilms have a low-grade and persistent inflammatory response, which leads to impaired epithelialization and granulation tissue formation, and reduced susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. Furthermore, a compromised host defense severely delays the healing of wounds in patients, contributing to infection.

Therefore, reducing the biofilm’s presence in wounds is, indeed, a critical element of effective wound care. Strategies to manage biofilm and encourage progression to wound healing are urgently needed.

We warmly welcome you to join us in this effort. Reviews or original research articles are most welcome. We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Célia Fortuna Rodrigues
Dr. Caitlin Light
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • antimicrobial therapy
  • phage therapy
  • anti-biofilm technologies
  • acute and chronic wound management
  • dressing technologies

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 172 KiB  
Editorial
Biofilms in Wounds: New Advances in Therapy and in Healing Management
by Célia F. Rodrigues, Karishma S. Kaushik and Caitlin Light
Biomedicines 2021, 9(2), 193; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines9020193 - 16 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1621
Abstract
Biofilms are the major way of life for both bacteria and fungi [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biofilms in Wounds: New Advances in Therapy and in Healing Management)

Research

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20 pages, 6683 KiB  
Article
Thymoquinone-Loaded Polymeric Films and Hydrogels for Bacterial Disinfection and Wound Healing
by Anika Haq, Suneel Kumar, Yong Mao, Francois Berthiaume and Bozena Michniak-Kohn
Biomedicines 2020, 8(10), 386; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines8100386 - 28 Sep 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3558
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to synthesize and characterize novel biocompatible topical polymeric film and hydrogel systems that have the potential to deliver the antibacterial agent thymoquinone (TQ) directly to the skin target site to manage the local wound infection and thereby [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to synthesize and characterize novel biocompatible topical polymeric film and hydrogel systems that have the potential to deliver the antibacterial agent thymoquinone (TQ) directly to the skin target site to manage the local wound infection and thereby wound healing. The polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) matrix-type films containing TQ were prepared by the solvent casting method. In vitro skin permeation studies on human cadaver skin produced a mean flux of 2.3 µg TQ/cm2/h. Human keratinocyte monolayers subjected to a scratch wound (an in vitro wound healing assay) showed 85% wound closure at day 6 in the TQ group (100 ng/mL TQ) as compared to 50% in the vehicle control group (p = 0.0001). In a zone-of-inhibition (ZOI) assay, TQ-containing films and hydrogels completely wiped out Staphylococcus aureus in 10 cm diameter Tryptic Soy Agar plates while 500 µg/mL gentamicin containing filters gave 10 mm of ZOI. In an ex vivo model, TQ-containing films eradicated bacterial colonization on human cadaver skin. Furthermore, in a full-thickness wound infection model in mice, TQ-containing films showed significant activity in controlling Staphylococcus aureus infection, thereby disinfecting the skin wound. In summary, TQ-containing PVP films and hydrogels developed in this study have the potential to treat and manage wound infections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biofilms in Wounds: New Advances in Therapy and in Healing Management)
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10 pages, 4290 KiB  
Article
Organo-Selenium-Containing Polyester Bandage Inhibits Bacterial Biofilm Growth on the Bandage and in the Wound
by Phat Tran, Tyler Enos, Keaton Luth, Abdul Hamood, Coby Ray, Kelly Mitchell and Ted W. Reid
Biomedicines 2020, 8(3), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines8030062 - 17 Mar 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3033
Abstract
The dressing material of a wound plays a key role since bacteria can live in the bandage and keep re-infecting the wound, thus a bandage is needed that blocks biofilm in the bandage. Using an in vivo wound biofilm model, we examined the [...] Read more.
The dressing material of a wound plays a key role since bacteria can live in the bandage and keep re-infecting the wound, thus a bandage is needed that blocks biofilm in the bandage. Using an in vivo wound biofilm model, we examined the effectiveness of an organo-selenium (OS)-coated polyester dressing to inhibit the growth of bacteria in a wound. Staphylococcus aureus (as well as MRSA, Methicillin resistant Staph aureus), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were chosen for the wound infection study. All the bacteria were enumerated in the wound dressing and in the wound tissue under the dressing. Using colony-forming unit (CFU) assays, over 7 logs of inhibition (100%) was found for all the bacterial strains on the material of the OS-coated wound dressing and in the tissue under that dressing. Confocal laser scanning microscopy along with IVIS spectrum in vivo imaging confirmed the CFU results. Thus, the dressing acts as a reservoir for a biofilm, which causes wound infection. The same results were obtained after soaking the dressing in PBS at 37 °C for three months before use. These results suggest that an OS coating on polyester dressing is both effective and durable in blocking wound infection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biofilms in Wounds: New Advances in Therapy and in Healing Management)
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Review

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26 pages, 417 KiB  
Review
Recent Advances in Non-Conventional Antimicrobial Approaches for Chronic Wound Biofilms: Have We Found the ‘Chink in the Armor’?
by Snehal Kadam, Saptarsi Shai, Aditi Shahane and Karishma S Kaushik
Biomedicines 2019, 7(2), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines7020035 - 30 Apr 2019
Cited by 55 | Viewed by 9419
Abstract
Chronic wounds are a major healthcare burden, with huge public health and economic impact. Microbial infections are the single most important cause of chronic, non-healing wounds. Chronic wound infections typically form biofilms, which are notoriously recalcitrant to conventional antibiotics. This prompts the need [...] Read more.
Chronic wounds are a major healthcare burden, with huge public health and economic impact. Microbial infections are the single most important cause of chronic, non-healing wounds. Chronic wound infections typically form biofilms, which are notoriously recalcitrant to conventional antibiotics. This prompts the need for alternative or adjunct ‘anti-biofilm’ approaches, notably those that account for the unique chronic wound biofilm microenvironment. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in non-conventional antimicrobial approaches for chronic wound biofilms, looking beyond standard antibiotic therapies. These non-conventional strategies are discussed under three groups. The first group focuses on treatment approaches that directly kill or inhibit microbes in chronic wound biofilms, using mechanisms or delivery strategies distinct from antibiotics. The second group discusses antimicrobial approaches that modify the biological, chemical or biophysical parameters in the chronic wound microenvironment, which in turn enables the disruption and removal of biofilms. Finally, therapeutic approaches that affect both, biofilm bacteria and microenvironment factors, are discussed. Understanding the advantages and limitations of these recent approaches, their stage of development and role in biofilm management, could lead to new treatment paradigms for chronic wound infections. Towards this end, we discuss the possibility that non-conventional antimicrobial therapeutics and targets could expose the ‘chink in the armor’ of chronic wound biofilms, thereby providing much-needed alternative or adjunct strategies for wound infection management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biofilms in Wounds: New Advances in Therapy and in Healing Management)
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31 pages, 2227 KiB  
Review
Current Status of In Vitro Models and Assays for Susceptibility Testing for Wound Biofilm Infections
by Tania F. Bahamondez-Canas, Lara A. Heersema and Hugh D. C. Smyth
Biomedicines 2019, 7(2), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines7020034 - 30 Apr 2019
Cited by 47 | Viewed by 7870
Abstract
Biofilm infections have gained recognition as an important therapeutic challenge in the last several decades due to their relationship with the chronicity of infectious diseases. Studies of novel therapeutic treatments targeting infections require the development and use of models to mimic the formation [...] Read more.
Biofilm infections have gained recognition as an important therapeutic challenge in the last several decades due to their relationship with the chronicity of infectious diseases. Studies of novel therapeutic treatments targeting infections require the development and use of models to mimic the formation and characteristics of biofilms within host tissues. Due to the diversity of reported in vitro models and lack of consensus, this review aims to provide a summary of in vitro models currently used in research. In particular, we review the various reported in vitro models of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms due to its high clinical impact in chronic wounds and in other chronic infections. We assess advances in in vitro models that incorporate relevant multispecies biofilms found in infected wounds, such as P. aeruginosa with Staphylococcus aureus, and additional elements such as mammalian cells, simulating fluids, and tissue explants in an attempt to better represent the physiological conditions found at an infection site. It is hoped this review will aid researchers in the field to make appropriate choices in their proposed studies with regards to in vitro models and methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biofilms in Wounds: New Advances in Therapy and in Healing Management)
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