Special Issue "Advanced Drug Delivery Systems and Devices"

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ramana Pidaparti
Website
Guest Editor
College of Engineering, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
Interests: design innovation; nano/micro-technology; biomechanics; drug delivery devices; STEM education
Dr. Hu Yang
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Life Scicene Engineering, Department of Pharmaceutics, Massey Cancer Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, USA
Interests: nanomedicine; biomaterials; drug delivery; dendrimer; gene therapy; cancer therapy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Drug delivery systems and devices constitute an important component of modern diagnostics and therapy and have been applied successfully in achieving targeted therapy and/or controlled drug release. The convergence of engineering, medicine, and pharmacy has led to the emergence of a number of innovative drug delivery systems and devices and profoundly influenced the application of drugs in clinical practice to improve drug therapy outcomes.

This Special Issue invites review and research articles to cover a broad range of drug delivery topics such as design, fabrication, in vitro and in vivo studies, as well as latest advances in drug delivery systems and device technologies and applications.

Dr. Ramana Pidaparti
Dr. Hu Yang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • implantable drug delivery devices
  • polymer drug delivery systems
  • nanomedicine
  • nanoparticles
  • microparticles
  • micelles
  • hydrogels
  • pharmaceutical formulations
  • biomedical applications
  • cancer
  • chronic diseases
  • MEMS/BioMEMS

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
The Effects of Alkyl Chain Combinations on the Structural and Mechanical Properties of Biomimetic Ion Pair Amphiphile Bilayers
Bioengineering 2017, 4(4), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering4040084 - 11 Oct 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
Ion pair amphiphile (IPA), a lipid-like complex composed of a pair of cationic and anionic surfactants, has great potentials in various pharmaceutical applications. In this work, we utilized molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to systematically examine the structural and mechanical properties of the biomimetic [...] Read more.
Ion pair amphiphile (IPA), a lipid-like complex composed of a pair of cationic and anionic surfactants, has great potentials in various pharmaceutical applications. In this work, we utilized molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to systematically examine the structural and mechanical properties of the biomimetic bilayers consist of alkyltrimethyl-ammonium-alkylsulfate (CmTMA+-CnS) IPAs with various alkyl chain combinations. Our simulations show an intrinsic one-atom offset for the CmTMA+ and CnS alignment, leading to the asymmetric index definition of ΔC = m − (n + 1). Larger |ΔC| gives rise to higher conformational fluctuations of the alkyl chains with the reduced packing order and mechanical strength. In contrast, increasing the IPA chain length enhances the van der Waals interactions within the bilayer and thus improves the bilayer packing order and mechanical properties. Further elongating the CmTMA+-CnS alkyl chains to m and n ≥ 12 causes the liquid disorder to gel phase transition of the bilayer at 298 K, with the threshold membrane properties of 0.45 nm2 molecular area, deuterium order parameter value of 0.31, and effective bending rigidity of 20 kBT, etc. The combined results provide molecular insights into the design of biomimetic IPA bilayers with wide structural and mechanical characteristics for various applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Drug Delivery Systems and Devices)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Bio-Inspired Multi-Functional Drug Transport Design Concept and Simulations
Bioengineering 2017, 4(2), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering4020037 - 25 Apr 2017
Abstract
In this study, we developed a microdevice concept for drug/fluidic transport taking an inspiration from supramolecular motor found in biological cells. Specifically, idealized multi-functional design geometry (nozzle/diffuser/nozzle) was developed for (i) fluidic/particle transport; (ii) particle separation; and (iii) droplet generation. Several design simulations [...] Read more.
In this study, we developed a microdevice concept for drug/fluidic transport taking an inspiration from supramolecular motor found in biological cells. Specifically, idealized multi-functional design geometry (nozzle/diffuser/nozzle) was developed for (i) fluidic/particle transport; (ii) particle separation; and (iii) droplet generation. Several design simulations were conducted to demonstrate the working principles of the multi-functional device. The design simulations illustrate that the proposed design concept is feasible for multi-functionality. However, further experimentation and optimization studies are needed to fully evaluate the multifunctional device concept for multiple applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Drug Delivery Systems and Devices)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Ereptiospiration
Bioengineering 2017, 4(2), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering4020033 - 12 Apr 2017
Abstract
Pure coconut oil, lanolin, and acetaminophen were vaporized at rates of 1–50 mg/min, using a porous network exhibiting a temperature gradient from 5000 to 5500 K/mm, without incurring noticeable chemical changes due to combustion, oxidation, or other thermally-induced chemical structural changes. The newly [...] Read more.
Pure coconut oil, lanolin, and acetaminophen were vaporized at rates of 1–50 mg/min, using a porous network exhibiting a temperature gradient from 5000 to 5500 K/mm, without incurring noticeable chemical changes due to combustion, oxidation, or other thermally-induced chemical structural changes. The newly coined term “ereptiospiration” is used here to describe this combination of thermal transpiration at high temperature gradients since the process can force the creation of thermal aerosols by rapid heating in a localized zone. Experimental data were generated for these materials using two different supports for metering the materials to the battery powered coil: namely, a stainless steel fiber bundle and a 3-D printed steel cartridge. Heating coconut oil, lanolin, or acetaminophen in a beaker to lower temperatures than those achieved at the surface of the coil showed noticeable and rapid degradation in the samples, while visual and olfactory observations for ereptiospiration showed no noticeable degradation in lanolin and coconut oil while HPLC chromatograms along with visual observation confirm that within the limit of detection, acetaminophen remains chemically unaltered by ereptiospiration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Drug Delivery Systems and Devices)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Optimization of a Diaphragm for a Micro-Shock Tube-Based Drug Delivery Method
Bioengineering 2017, 4(1), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering4010024 - 14 Mar 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
This paper presents the design optimization of diaphragms for a micro-shock tube-based drug delivery device. The function of the diaphragm is to impart the required velocity and direction to the loosely held drug particles on the diaphragm through van der Waals interaction. The [...] Read more.
This paper presents the design optimization of diaphragms for a micro-shock tube-based drug delivery device. The function of the diaphragm is to impart the required velocity and direction to the loosely held drug particles on the diaphragm through van der Waals interaction. The finite element model-based studies involved diaphragms made up of copper, brass and aluminium. The study of the influence of material and geometric parameters serves as a vital tool in optimizing the magnitude and direction of velocity distribution on the diaphragm surface. Experiments carried out using a micro-shock tube validate the final deformed shape of the diaphragms determined from the finite element simulation. The diaphragm yields a maximum velocity of 335 m/s for which the maximum deviation of the velocity vector is 0.62°. Drug particles that travel to the destination target tissue are simulated using the estimated velocity distribution and angular deviation. Further, a theoretical model of penetration helps in the prediction of the drug particle penetration in the skin tissue like a target, which is found to be 0.126 mm. The design and calibration procedure of a micro-shock tube device to alter drug particle penetration considering the skin thickness and property are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Drug Delivery Systems and Devices)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Personalised 3D Printed Medicines: Which Techniques and Polymers Are More Successful?
Bioengineering 2017, 4(4), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering4040079 - 22 Sep 2017
Cited by 54
Abstract
The interindividual variability is an increasingly global problem when treating patients from different backgrounds with diverse customs, metabolism, and necessities. Dose adjustment is frequently based on empirical methods, and therefore, the chance of undesirable side effects to occur is high. Three-dimensional (3D) Printed [...] Read more.
The interindividual variability is an increasingly global problem when treating patients from different backgrounds with diverse customs, metabolism, and necessities. Dose adjustment is frequently based on empirical methods, and therefore, the chance of undesirable side effects to occur is high. Three-dimensional (3D) Printed medicines are revolutionsing the pharmaceutical market as potential tools to achieve personalised treatments adapted to the specific requirements of each patient, taking into account their age, weight, comorbidities, pharmacogenetic, and pharmacokinetic characteristics. Additive manufacturing or 3D printing consists of a wide range of techniques classified in many categories but only three of them are mostly used in the 3D printing of medicines: printing-based inkjet systems, nozzle-based deposition systems, and laser-based writing systems. There are several drawbacks when using each technique and also the type of polymers readily available do not always possess the optimal properties for every drug. The aim of this review is to give an overview about the current techniques employed in 3D printing medicines, highlighting their advantages, disadvantages, along with the polymer and drug requirements for a successful printing. The major application of these techniques will be also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Drug Delivery Systems and Devices)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview
Development of Antibody–Drug Conjugates Using DDS and Molecular Imaging
Bioengineering 2017, 4(3), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering4030078 - 17 Sep 2017
Cited by 12
Abstract
Antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), as a next generation of antibody therapeutics, is a combination of an antibody and a drug connected via a specialized linker. ADC has four action steps: systemic circulation, the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, penetration within the tumor tissue, [...] Read more.
Antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), as a next generation of antibody therapeutics, is a combination of an antibody and a drug connected via a specialized linker. ADC has four action steps: systemic circulation, the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, penetration within the tumor tissue, and action on cells, such as through drug delivery system (DDS) drugs. An antibody with a size of about 10 nm has the same capacity for passive targeting as some DDS carriers, depending on the EPR effect. In addition, some antibodies are capable of active targeting. A linker is stable in the bloodstream but should release drugs efficiently in the tumor cells or their microenvironment. Thus, the linker technology is actually a typical controlled release technology in DDS. Here, we focused on molecular imaging. Fluorescent and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is useful for the visualization and evaluation of antibody delivery in terms of passive and active targeting in the systemic circulation and in tumors. To evaluate the controlled release of the ADC in the targeted area, a mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with a mass microscope, to visualize the drug released from ADC, was used. As a result, we succeeded in confirming the significant anti-tumor activity of anti-fibrin, or anti-tissue factor-ADC, in preclinical settings by using DDS and molecular imaging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Drug Delivery Systems and Devices)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Polysaccharide Fabrication Platforms and Biocompatibility Assessment as Candidate Wound Dressing Materials
Bioengineering 2017, 4(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering4010001 - 18 Jan 2017
Cited by 22
Abstract
Wound dressings are critical for wound care because they provide a physical barrier between the injury site and outside environment, preventing further damage or infection. Wound dressings also manage and even encourage the wound healing process for proper recovery. Polysaccharide biopolymers are slowly [...] Read more.
Wound dressings are critical for wound care because they provide a physical barrier between the injury site and outside environment, preventing further damage or infection. Wound dressings also manage and even encourage the wound healing process for proper recovery. Polysaccharide biopolymers are slowly becoming popular as modern wound dressings materials because they are naturally derived, highly abundant, inexpensive, absorbent, non-toxic and non-immunogenic. Polysaccharide biopolymers have also been processed into biomimetic platforms that offer a bioactive component in wound dressings that aid the healing process. This review primarily focuses on the fabrication and biocompatibility assessment of polysaccharide materials. Specifically, fabrication platforms such as electrospun fibers and hydrogels, their fabrication considerations and popular polysaccharides such as chitosan, alginate, and hyaluronic acid among emerging options such as arabinoxylan are discussed. A survey of biocompatibility and bioactive molecule release studies, leveraging polysaccharide’s naturally derived properties, is highlighted in the text, while challenges and future directions for wound dressing development using emerging fabrication techniques such as 3D bioprinting are outlined in the conclusion. This paper aims to encourage further investigation and open up new, disruptive avenues for polysaccharides in wound dressing material development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Drug Delivery Systems and Devices)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop