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Review

Personalised 3D Printed Medicines: Which Techniques and Polymers Are More Successful?

1
Departamento de Farmacia y Tecnología Farmacéutica, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Plaza Ramóny Cajal s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2
Instituto Universitario de Farmacia Industrial (IUFI), Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avenida Complutense, 28040 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Co-shared first authorship.
Academic Editors: Ramana Pidaparti and Hu Yang
Bioengineering 2017, 4(4), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering4040079
Received: 27 August 2017 / Revised: 14 September 2017 / Accepted: 20 September 2017 / Published: 22 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Drug Delivery Systems and Devices)
The interindividual variability is an increasingly global problem when treating patients from different backgrounds with diverse customs, metabolism, and necessities. Dose adjustment is frequently based on empirical methods, and therefore, the chance of undesirable side effects to occur is high. Three-dimensional (3D) Printed medicines are revolutionsing the pharmaceutical market as potential tools to achieve personalised treatments adapted to the specific requirements of each patient, taking into account their age, weight, comorbidities, pharmacogenetic, and pharmacokinetic characteristics. Additive manufacturing or 3D printing consists of a wide range of techniques classified in many categories but only three of them are mostly used in the 3D printing of medicines: printing-based inkjet systems, nozzle-based deposition systems, and laser-based writing systems. There are several drawbacks when using each technique and also the type of polymers readily available do not always possess the optimal properties for every drug. The aim of this review is to give an overview about the current techniques employed in 3D printing medicines, highlighting their advantages, disadvantages, along with the polymer and drug requirements for a successful printing. The major application of these techniques will be also discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: 3D printing; drug delivery; personalised medicine; polymers; FDM; SLA 3D printing; drug delivery; personalised medicine; polymers; FDM; SLA
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MDPI and ACS Style

Konta, A.A.; García-Piña, M.; Serrano, D.R. Personalised 3D Printed Medicines: Which Techniques and Polymers Are More Successful? Bioengineering 2017, 4, 79. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering4040079

AMA Style

Konta AA, García-Piña M, Serrano DR. Personalised 3D Printed Medicines: Which Techniques and Polymers Are More Successful? Bioengineering. 2017; 4(4):79. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering4040079

Chicago/Turabian Style

Konta, Andrea A., Marta García-Piña, and Dolores R. Serrano. 2017. "Personalised 3D Printed Medicines: Which Techniques and Polymers Are More Successful?" Bioengineering 4, no. 4: 79. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering4040079

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