Recent Advances in Microsurgery, Breast Reconstruction & Tissue Engineering

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1652

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
Interests: microvascular surgery; breast reconstruction; lymphedema; limb salvage

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
Interests: biomaterials; tissue regeneration; technology; angiogenesis; microsurgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to launch a new Special Issue of the renowned journal Bioengineering, titled ‘Recent Advances in Microsurgery, Breast Reconstruction & Tissue Engineering’.

The field of reconstructive microsurgery, particularly breast surgery, has experienced an unprecedented growth in recent years, thereby making it imperative to incorporate innovative biotechnologies to further enhance its efficiency, standardization, and promote better quality of care for the patients.

Therefore, this Special Issue aims to collate papers that focus on the recent advancements and innovations in this field, emphasizing the need for further collaboration between the fields of plastic surgery and industrial engineering, as well as highlighting the current gaps and limitations and providing implications for future research. Some potential topics include the integration of biotechnology in microsurgery, breast reconstruction surgery, limb preservation surgery, lymphedema, and nerve surgery.

Prof. Dr. Justin Michael Sacks
Dr. Xiaowei Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microsurgery
  • reconstruction surgery
  • breast surgery
  • lymphedema
  • nerve surgery
  • technology
  • biomaterials
  • imaging

Published Papers (2 papers)

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13 pages, 7467 KiB  
Article
Conceptualizing Scaffold Guided Breast Tissue Regeneration in a Preclinical Large Animal Model
by Matthew Cheng, Jan Janzekovic, Ronja Finze, Mina Mohseni, Siamak Saifzadeh, Flavia M. Savi, Owen Ung, Michael Wagels and Dietmar W. Hutmacher
Bioengineering 2024, 11(6), 593; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11060593 - 10 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Scaffold-guided breast tissue regeneration (SGBTR) can transform both reconstructive and cosmetic breast surgery. Implant-based surgery is the most common method. However, there are inherent limitations, as it involves replacement of tissue rather than regeneration. Regenerating autologous soft tissue has the potential to provide [...] Read more.
Scaffold-guided breast tissue regeneration (SGBTR) can transform both reconstructive and cosmetic breast surgery. Implant-based surgery is the most common method. However, there are inherent limitations, as it involves replacement of tissue rather than regeneration. Regenerating autologous soft tissue has the potential to provide a more like-for-like reconstruction with minimal morbidity. Our SGBTR approach regenerates soft tissue by implanting additively manufactured bioresorbable scaffolds filled with autologous fat graft. A pre-clinical large animal study was conducted by implanting 100 mL breast scaffolds (n = 55) made from medical-grade polycaprolactone into 11 minipigs for 12 months. Various treatment groups were investigated where immediate or delayed autologous fat graft, as well as platelet rich plasma, were added to the scaffolds. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed on explanted scaffolds to determine the volume and distribution of the regenerated tissue. Histological analysis was performed to confirm the tissue type. At 12 months, we were able to regenerate and sustain a mean soft tissue volume of 60.9 ± 4.5 mL (95% CI) across all treatment groups. There was no evidence of capsule formation. There were no immediate or long-term post-operative complications. In conclusion, we were able to regenerate clinically relevant soft tissue volumes utilizing SGBTR in a pre-clinical large animal model. Full article
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12 pages, 1646 KiB  
Systematic Review
Adipose Tissue Derivatives in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration after Transection: A Systematic Review
by Rafael Silva de Araújo, Matheus Galvão Valadares Bertolini Mussalem, Gabriel Sant’Ana Carrijo, João Victor de Figueiredo Bani and Lydia Masako Ferreira
Bioengineering 2024, 11(7), 697; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11070697 - 10 Jul 2024
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Abstract
Introduction: Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is increasingly prevalent and challenging to treat despite advances in microsurgical techniques. In this context, adipose tissue derivatives, such as adipose-derived stem cells, nanofat, and stromal vascular fraction have been gaining attention as potential allies in peripheral nerve [...] Read more.
Introduction: Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is increasingly prevalent and challenging to treat despite advances in microsurgical techniques. In this context, adipose tissue derivatives, such as adipose-derived stem cells, nanofat, and stromal vascular fraction have been gaining attention as potential allies in peripheral nerve regeneration. Objectives: This study aims to explore the use of adipose tissue derivatives in nerve regeneration following peripheral nerve transection in murine models. Thus, we assess and synthesize the key techniques and methods used for evaluating the obtained nerve regeneration to guide future experimental research and clinical interventions. Methodology: A systematic review was conducted in February 2024, adhering to the Cochrane and PRISMA 2020 guidelines, using the PubMed, SciELO, and LILACS databases. The focus was on experimental studies involving adipose tissue derivatives in nerve regeneration in animal models post-transection. Only experimental trials reporting nerve regeneration outcomes were included; studies lacking a comparator group or evaluation methods were excluded. Results: Out of 273 studies initially identified from MEDLINE, 19 were selected for detailed analysis. The average study included 32.5 subjects, with about 10.2 subjects per intervention subgroup. The predominant model was the sciatic nerve injury with a 10 mm gap. The most common intervention involved unprocessed adipose-derived stem cells, utilized in 14 articles. Conclusions: This review underscores the significant potential of current methodologies in peripheral nerve regeneration, particularly highlighting the use of murine models and thorough evaluation techniques. Full article
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