Biologically Active Constituents and Their Applications for Skin Regeneration and Repair

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biochemical Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 1301

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Biomedicine and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Bioengineering Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510630, China
Interests: therapeutic proteins; liposome-assisted drug delivery; bioactive peptides and protein; growth factors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Biomaterial Research Laboratory, Department of Material Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry and Materials, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, China
2. Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510006, China
Interests: ECM; mechanism; 3D printing; hydrogel; skin repair

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue on “Biologically Active Constituents and Their Applications for Skin Regeneration and Repair” will focus on innovative, original research articles and comprehensive reviews that reflect the latest developments in the field. Both fundamental research and applied areas are of interest.

Submissions suitable for consideration may include but are not limited to:

  1. Construction and application of bacterial-derived vectors for drug delivery;
  2. Cell factories for active protein production;
  3. Protein-engineered functional materials;
  4. Future advanced technologies related to the preparation of natural extracts or active ingredients in plants;
  5. Transdermal absorption tests and investigations of deposit function conducted on penetration experiments.

The multidisciplinary and multi-context demonstration of this project has been supported by The Cosmetics Industry Related Associations of Jinan University Alumni Association which aims to 1) analyze these challenges and propose a series of new materials and new technologies to potential users and investors; 2) promote the originality and development of the major cosmetics companies; 3) develop the cosmetics industry.

Prof. Dr. Qi Xiang
Prof. Dr. Lihua Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • active constituents
  • protein
  • cell factory
  • biomaterials
  • drug carrier
  • drug delivery
  • bacterial derivatives
  • skin regeneration
  • skin repair

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 3827 KiB  
Article
Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells (hPDLSCs) Spontaneously Differentiate into Myofibroblasts to Repair Diabetic Wounds
by Yuxiao Li, Qi Su, Zhaoyu Tao, Xiang Cai, Yueping Zhao, Zhiying Zhou, Yadong Huang and Qi Xiang
Bioengineering 2024, 11(6), 602; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11060602 - 12 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Advanced glycation end product (AGE) accumulation due to diabetes causes vascular and neurological lesions, delaying healing. The use of stem cells could overcome these problems. Although many studies have shown the potential beneficial effects of stem cell therapies in the treatment of chronic [...] Read more.
Advanced glycation end product (AGE) accumulation due to diabetes causes vascular and neurological lesions, delaying healing. The use of stem cells could overcome these problems. Although many studies have shown the potential beneficial effects of stem cell therapies in the treatment of chronic and refractory skin ulcers, their delivery methods are still under investigation. Human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) can spontaneously differentiate into myofibroblasts in specific cultures; therefore, they have the potential to effectively treat diabetic wounds and may also have applications in the field of medical cosmetics. The myofibroblastic differentiation ability of hPDLSCs in the presence of AGEs was evaluated by the expression of α-SMA and COL1A1 using RT-qPCR and WB technology. Wound healing in diabetic mice, induced by streptozotocin (STZ) and assessed using H&E staining, Masson staining, and immunohistochemical (IHC) and immunofluorescence (IF) staining, was used to validate the effects of hPDLSCs. In the wound tissues, the expression of α-SMA, COL1A1, CD31, CD206, iNOS, and vimentin was detected. The findings indicated that in H-DMEM, the expression of COL1A1 exhibited a significant decrease, while α-SMA demonstrated an increase in P7 cells, ignoring the damage from AGEs (p < 0.05). In an STZ-induced diabetic C57BL/6J mice whole-skin defect model, the healing rate of the hPDLSCs treatment group was significantly higher than that in the models (on the 7th day, the rate was 65.247% vs. 48.938%, p < 0.05). hPDLSCs have been shown to spontaneously differentiate into myofibroblasts in H-DMEM and resist damage from AGEs in both in vivo and in vitro models, suggesting their potential in the field of cosmetic dermatology. Full article
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17 pages, 3160 KiB  
Article
Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Hydrolyzed Royal Jelly Peptide in Human Dermal Fibroblasts: Implications for Skin Health and Care Applications
by Chang-Yu Yan, Qian-Qian Zhu, Cheng-Xi Guan, Gui-Lan Xiong, Xin-Xing Chen, Hai-Biao Gong, Jia-Wei Li, Shu-Hua Ouyang, Hiroshi Kurihara, Yi-Fang Li and Rong-Rong He
Bioengineering 2024, 11(5), 496; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11050496 - 16 May 2024
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Abstract
Hydrolyzed royal jelly peptide (RJP) has garnered attention for its health-promoting functions. However, the potential applications of RJP in skincare have not been fully explored. In this study, we prepared RJP through the enzymatic hydrolysis of royal jelly protein with trypsin and investigated [...] Read more.
Hydrolyzed royal jelly peptide (RJP) has garnered attention for its health-promoting functions. However, the potential applications of RJP in skincare have not been fully explored. In this study, we prepared RJP through the enzymatic hydrolysis of royal jelly protein with trypsin and investigated its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties on primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Our results demonstrate that RJP effectively inhibits oxidative damage induced by H2O2 and lipid peroxidation triggered by AAPH and t-BuOOH in HDFs. This effect may be attributed to the ability of RJP to enhance the level of glutathione and the activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase 4, as well as its excellent iron chelating capacity. Furthermore, RJP modulates the NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammatory response in HDFs, suppressing the mRNA expressions of NLRP3 and IL-1β in the primer stage induced by LPS and the release of mature IL-1β induced by ATP, monosodium urate, or nigericin in the activation stage. RJP also represses the expressions of COX2 and iNOS induced by LPS. Finally, we reveal that RJP exhibits superior antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties over unhydrolyzed royal jelly protein. These findings suggest that RJP exerts protective effects on skin cells through antioxidative and anti-inflammatory mechanisms, indicating its promise for potential therapeutic avenues for managing oxidative stress and inflammation-related skin disorders. Full article
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