Musculoskeletal Disorders and Diseases: Biomechanical Modeling in Sport, Health, Rehabilitation and Ergonomics

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomechanics and Sports Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 2848

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
International Institute of Biomechanics and Occupational Ergonomics, Université de Toulon, CS60584, 83041 Toulon, France
Interests: musculoskeletal disorders; systematic reviews and meta-analysis; occupational health; ergonomics; biomechanics; MSD prevalence; safety; public health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Protecting people at work and at leisure, and improving their quality of life, is one of the major challenges of our century. From this perspective, understanding the mechanisms that lead to the development of musculoskeletal disorders and diseases is a major multidisciplinary scientific challenge. This Special Issue is dedicated to recent advances in biomechanical modeling research used to explore and understand the musculoskeletal system (macro- and microscopic). Computational techniques, biomechanical calculation tools and numerical tools enable us to quantify and qualify the most important parameters (biomechanical, physiological, biological or environmental) involved in the onset, prevention and reduction of the effects of musculoskeletal disorders and/or the development of musculoskeletal diseases. They can be used as a complement to experimental protocols, clinical studies, process design, ergonomics, etc., to study, evaluate and understand various situations in life, such as repeated movements in the workplace, evaluation of leisure-time physical activities, analysis of sporting movements to assess performance, design of new equipment to compensate for a motor impairment, proposal of new recommendations in a clinical setting, etc. We support all articles promoting the latest research in the fields of sport, health, rehabilitation and ergonomics that contribute to improving people's health and quality of life.

Prof. Dr. Philippe Gorce
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • musculoskeletal disorders
  • musculoskeletal diseases
  • injury biomechanics
  • muscle biomechanics dynamic and kinematic modeling
  • gait and posture
  • muscle electromyography
  • motion analysis
  • postural control and balance
  • occupational health
  • occupational ergonomics
  • sport medicine
  • sport performance
  • quality of life

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 6070 KiB  
Article
Biomechanical Effects of the Badminton Split-Step on Forecourt Lunging Footwork
by Yile Wang, Liu Xu, Hanhui Jiang, Lin Yu, Hanzhang Wu and Qichang Mei
Bioengineering 2024, 11(5), 501; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11050501 - 17 May 2024
Viewed by 447
Abstract
Background: This research investigates the biomechanical impact of the split-step technique on forehand and backhand lunges in badminton, aiming to enhance players’ on-court movement efficiency. Despite the importance of agile positioning in badminton, the specific contributions of the split-step to the biomechanical impact [...] Read more.
Background: This research investigates the biomechanical impact of the split-step technique on forehand and backhand lunges in badminton, aiming to enhance players’ on-court movement efficiency. Despite the importance of agile positioning in badminton, the specific contributions of the split-step to the biomechanical impact of lunging footwork still need to be determined. Methods: This study examined the lower limb kinematics and ground reaction forces of 18 male badminton players performing forehand and backhand lunges. Data were collected using the VICON motion capture system and Kistler force platforms. Variability in biomechanical characteristics was assessed using paired-sample t-tests and Statistical Parametric Mapping 1D (SPM1D). Results: The study demonstrates that the split-step technique in badminton lunges significantly affects lower limb biomechanics. During forehand lunges, the split-step increases hip abduction and rotation while decreasing knee flexion at foot contact. In backhand lunges, it increases knee rotation and decreases ankle rotation. Additionally, the split-step enhances the loading rate of the initial ground reaction force peak and narrows the time gap between the first two peaks. Conclusions: These findings underscore the split-step’s potential in optimizing lunging techniques, improving performance and reducing injury risks in badminton athletes. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 2874 KiB  
Article
Compensation Method for Missing and Misidentified Skeletons in Nursing Care Action Assessment by Improving Spatial Temporal Graph Convolutional Networks
by Xin Han, Norihiro Nishida, Minoru Morita, Takashi Sakai and Zhongwei Jiang
Bioengineering 2024, 11(2), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11020127 - 29 Jan 2024
Viewed by 879
Abstract
With the increasing aging population, nursing care providers have been facing a substantial risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). Visual-based pose estimation methods, like OpenPose, are commonly used for ergonomic posture risk assessment. However, these methods face difficulty when identifying overlapping and interactive [...] Read more.
With the increasing aging population, nursing care providers have been facing a substantial risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). Visual-based pose estimation methods, like OpenPose, are commonly used for ergonomic posture risk assessment. However, these methods face difficulty when identifying overlapping and interactive nursing tasks, resulting in missing and misidentified skeletons. To address this, we propose a skeleton compensation method using improved spatial temporal graph convolutional networks (ST-GCN), which integrates kinematic chain and action features to assess skeleton integrity and compensate for it. The results verified the effectiveness of our approach in optimizing skeletal loss and misidentification in nursing care tasks, leading to improved accuracy in calculating both skeleton joint angles and REBA scores. Moreover, comparative analysis against other skeleton compensation methods demonstrated the superior performance of our approach, achieving an 87.34% REBA accuracy score. Collectively, our method might hold promising potential for optimizing the skeleton loss and misidentification in nursing care tasks. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 5057 KiB  
Article
Modeling and Analysis of Foot Function in Human Gait Using a Two-Degrees-of-Freedom Inverted Pendulum Model with an Arced Foot
by Qian Xiang, Shijie Guo, Jiaxin Wang, Kazunobu Hashimoto, Yong Liu and Lei Liu
Bioengineering 2023, 10(12), 1344; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10121344 - 22 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1041
Abstract
Gait models are important for the design and control of lower limb exoskeletons. The inverted pendulum model has advantages in simplicity and computational efficiency, but it also has the limitations of oversimplification and lack of realism. This paper proposes a two-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) inverted [...] Read more.
Gait models are important for the design and control of lower limb exoskeletons. The inverted pendulum model has advantages in simplicity and computational efficiency, but it also has the limitations of oversimplification and lack of realism. This paper proposes a two-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) inverted pendulum walking model by considering the knee joints for describing the characteristics of human gait. A new parameter, roll factor, is defined to express foot function in the model, and the relationships between the roll factor and gait parameters are investigated. Experiments were conducted to verify the model by testing seven healthy adults at different walking speeds. The results demonstrate that the roll factor has a strong relationship with other gait kinematics parameters, so it can be used as a simple parameter for expressing gait kinematics. In addition, the roll factor can be used to identify walking styles with high accuracy, including small broken step walking at 99.57%, inefficient walking at 98.14%, and normal walking at 99.43%. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop