Special Issue "How Important Volatile Compounds Are for the Success of Beverages?"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Angel A. Carbonell-Barrachina
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universi dad Miguel Hernández de Elche (UMH), Escuela Politécnica Superior de Orihuela (EPSO), Spain
Interests: Sensory evaluation of foods; Consumer studies; Food quality; Food safety; Volatile compounds; Pomegranate; Quinces; Unit operations; Rice based-foods; Arsenic and heavy metals; Turrón and nougat; Pistachios and almonds
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A wonderful aged Sherry wine has a pale brown color and strong alcohol intensity, but what makes it different and superior to other wines is its aromatic profile. In a similar way, what is the main difference between a tomato juice prepared using seasonal tomatoes of a traditional-local cultivar and juice prepared using tomatoes grown in a fast cycle in a greenhouse? Seasonal fruit juice will have more sugars and organic acids, but when we close our eyes and drink the juice, the full and complex set of volatile compounds (odor-active) will fill our mouth with their green, vegetable, tomato-ID aromas. Our senses will make us travel to the farm and feel the amazing smell of the tomato plants. In summary, what makes a “fantastic” drink different from a “basic” one is the complexity of its aroma profile; however, working with volatile compounds is extremely difficult. Most of the compounds are themosensitive, have isomers with completely different odor activities, not all the compounds will have a significant contribution to the final aroma, etc. Thus, it is extremely important that the isolation, identification, and quantification of volatile compounds be done using proper analytical techniques and equipment.

Therefore, let us put together all our knowledge and know-how on volatile compounds, and prepare a fantastic Special Issue of the journal Beverages that will become reference material for all new researchers starting to work on this topic.

Prof. Dr. Angel A. Carbonell-Barrachina
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Modelling Changes in Volatile Compounds in British Columbian Varietal Wines That Were Bottle Aged for Up to 120 Months
Beverages 2019, 5(3), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages5030057 - 06 Sep 2019
Abstract
This research quantified 46 volatile compounds in vintage wines (1998–2005) from British Columbia (BC), which had been bottle-aged for up to 120 months. Wines were analyzed up to five times, between December 2003 and October 2008. Compounds were identified using gas chromatography mass [...] Read more.
This research quantified 46 volatile compounds in vintage wines (1998–2005) from British Columbia (BC), which had been bottle-aged for up to 120 months. Wines were analyzed up to five times, between December 2003 and October 2008. Compounds were identified using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and their concentrations were related to “wine age” using single linear regression (SLR). SLR models were developed for each wine compound (eight alcohol, 12 ester/acetate, one acid, one aldehyde, one sulfur) in eight varietal wines: six red (Cabernet franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Meritage, Merlot, Pinot noir, Syrah) and two white (Chardonnay, Pinot gris). Parameter estimates (b0, intercept; b1, slope) and R2 values for models were reported for each compound and each variety. Most of the significant SLR models (109/123) had negative slopes (−b1 coefficients), indicating a decrease in the compounds’ concentration with “wine age”. The b1 coefficients were very small for isobutyl acetate, ethyl isovalerate and ethyl decanoate (−0.00013 to −0.0006 mg/L/mon) and largest (most negative) for 3-methyl-1-butanol, ethyl lactate and isobutyl alcohol (−2.26 to −6.26 mg/L/mon). A few SLR models (14/123) had positive slopes (+b1 coefficients), indicating an increase in the compounds’ concentration with “wine age”, particularly for acetaldehyde, diethyl succinate, ethyl formate and dimethyl sulfide. The +b1 coefficients were smallest for ethyl decanoate (0.0001 mg/L/mon) and dimethyl sulfide (0.00024 mg/L/mon) and largest for dimethyl succinate and acetaldehyde (0.06 mg/L/mon). These values varied by four orders of magnitude (104), reflecting the large concentration range observed for the different volatile compounds. The work provided, for the first time, an empirical (non-theoretical) approach to documenting the evolution of volatile compounds in BC wines. It equipped the industry with an easy-to-use new tool for predicting the concentration of desirable or undesirable compounds in their wines and assisted the industry with decision making regarding the release of their wines into the marketplace. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue How Important Volatile Compounds Are for the Success of Beverages?)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Volatile Profiles of Sparkling Wines Produced by the Traditional Method from a Semi-Arid Region
Beverages 2018, 4(4), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages4040103 - 07 Dec 2018
Abstract
São Francisco Valley (SFV) is located in Northeastern Brazil, in a tropical semi-arid region where one vine can produce two harvests per year, due to high temperatures, solar radiation rates, and irrigation throughout the year. This is the main characteristic differing this from [...] Read more.
São Francisco Valley (SFV) is located in Northeastern Brazil, in a tropical semi-arid region where one vine can produce two harvests per year, due to high temperatures, solar radiation rates, and irrigation throughout the year. This is the main characteristic differing this from other winegrowing region in the world. The objective of this study was to characterize volatile profiles of sparkling wines produced by the traditional method, using Chenin Blanc and Syrah grapes, the two main varieties used for white and red wines, respectively, grown in the region. The sparkling wines remained on lees for six months maturing. The sparkling wines were characterized by the parameters density, pH, total titratable and volatile acidities, residual sugars, dry extract, alcohol content, total phenolic compounds, in vitro antioxidant activity and volatile fraction. The volatile fraction extraction was performed by the HS-SPME technique and tentative identification of the volatile compounds was carried out with GC-MS using the scan mode. A total of 33 volatile compounds were identified, among them 11 alcohols, 13 esters, five carboxylic acids, and four different chemical classes. The volatile profile of Chenin Blanc sparkling wine was associated mainly to 2,3-butanediol, 3-ethoxypropan-1-ol, diethyl succinate, and ethyl decanoate, while Syrah sparkling wine was characterized by benzaldehyde, butyric acid, and some acetates. This study reported for the first time volatile profiles of traditional sparkling wines from SFV, as new products, contributing to better understand the quality potential of these beverages for a tropical semi-arid region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue How Important Volatile Compounds Are for the Success of Beverages?)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop