Special Issue "Marketing and Management of Wine and Consumer Choice"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 December 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Julie Bower

Independent scholar
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 01905 921 321
Interests: alcoholic beverages market structure; competition and merger policy; regulatory capture

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

Following rapid growth in the early 2000s, global wine consumption has flatlined at around 240 million hectoliters per annum since 2009. However, the pedestrian aggregate growth masks differential performance at both the country and category level, as consumer tastes have evolved. The Special Issue presents a forum to showcase research that illuminates the challenges and opportunities faced by the wine industry in seeking to regain and broaden its position in the global alcoholic beverages market. The following examples are suggestions of where submissions could further knowledge of marketing and management practice as part of the wine industry’s growth objectives:

  • Segmentation and differentiation of the wine category over time and in different  geographic markets
  • The impact of regulation and taxation on wine consumption
  • Advertising opportunities and constraints, for example in labelling, sponsorship events and other consumer interface activities
  • Managing marketing programmes in ‘old economy’ and ‘new economy’ distribution platforms and networks
  • Inter and intra-industry collaboration, for example in distribution and supply-chain management
  • Retail concentration and the significance of retail buyers in influencing consumer purchasing decisions       
Dr. Julie Bower
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Consumer Drivers of Muscadine Wine Purchase Decisions
Received: 5 October 2018 / Revised: 26 November 2018 / Accepted: 28 November 2018 / Published: 3 December 2018
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Abstract
Muscadine wine, fresh muscadine grapes, and other derivatives have enjoyed a heritage niche for decades in the Southeast. Muscadine growers in North Carolina in the United States (US) have asked whether the purchase of muscadine wine is linked to consumption of the fruit [...] Read more.
Muscadine wine, fresh muscadine grapes, and other derivatives have enjoyed a heritage niche for decades in the Southeast. Muscadine growers in North Carolina in the United States (US) have asked whether the purchase of muscadine wine is linked to consumption of the fruit itself or even familiarity with other muscadine-based products in terms of spillover effects. The authors explored the interdependency between the market for fresh muscadine grapes and muscadine wine purchase. Consumer panel data were obtained from a State of North Carolina agency with oversight of the grape and wine industry; the agency contracted quota sampling of online consumers from six states in the US South. A total of 543 cases were used in the present study. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS)® was employed in analysis. Results show that prior muscadine wine knowledge and knowledge of other muscadine products, e.g., jams, juices, smoothies, sauces, and health/beauty products were significant factors associated with buying muscadine wine. Beliefs about muscadine grapes as a healthy ingredient showed a slight influence, while direct experience with fresh muscadines and consumer attitudes towards buying local or US products were insignificant. Therefore, marketing efforts should focus on increasing consumer exposure to and knowledge of muscadine wine and other muscadine related products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing and Management of Wine and Consumer Choice)
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Open AccessArticle
The Evolution of the UK Wine Market: From Niche to Mass-Market Appeal
Received: 4 October 2018 / Revised: 30 October 2018 / Accepted: 8 November 2018 / Published: 12 November 2018
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Abstract
This article is an historic narrative account of the emergence of the mass-market wine category in the UK in the post-World War II era. The role of the former vertically-integrated brewing industry in the early stages of development is described from the perspective [...] Read more.
This article is an historic narrative account of the emergence of the mass-market wine category in the UK in the post-World War II era. The role of the former vertically-integrated brewing industry in the early stages of development is described from the perspective of both their distributional effects and their new product development initiatives. Significant in the narrative is the story of Babycham, the UK’s answer to Champagne that was targeted to the new consumers of the 1950s; women. Then a specially-developed French wine, Le Piat D’Or, with its catchy advertising campaign, took the baton. These early brands were instrumental in extending the wine category, as beer continued its precipitous decline. That the UK is now one of the largest wine markets globally owes much to the success of these early brands and those that arrived later in the 1990s, with Australia displacing France as the source for mass-market appeal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing and Management of Wine and Consumer Choice)
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Other

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Open AccessConcept Paper
Rethinking Luxury for Segmentation and Brand Strategy: The Semiotic Square and Identity Prism Model for Fine Wines
Received: 9 November 2018 / Revised: 4 March 2019 / Accepted: 7 March 2019 / Published: 19 March 2019
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Abstract
Positioning a fine wine is a complex marketing operation which tends to focus on product characteristics and tends to ignore the consumer–brand relationship. As for other luxury products, fine wine consumers are a heterogeneous group which can be broken down into clearly distinctive [...] Read more.
Positioning a fine wine is a complex marketing operation which tends to focus on product characteristics and tends to ignore the consumer–brand relationship. As for other luxury products, fine wine consumers are a heterogeneous group which can be broken down into clearly distinctive and often antithetical subgroups. This conceptual paper proposes a different approach to defining fine wine consumers and the brand–consumer interaction. The Aristotle-inspired semiotic square model and Kapferer’s brand identity prism were coupled to identify not only fine wine consumer groups but also with which brand characteristics they mainly interact. While the semiotic square model identifies 6 distinct groups of fine wine consumers—enthusiasts, experts, connoisseurs, drinker, novice, event goers—the brand identity prism recognizes 6 constructs—physique (material), personality, culture, relationship, reflection and self-image. Pairing the consumer’s semiotic square and the brand’s identity prism could help brands to bridge the gap between the actual consumer subgroups and the ideal target consumers to better understand their customer base, to correctly position their brand, and to create an inclusive marketing strategy. This article is the first to apply the semiotic square/brand identity prism model within the context of the fine wine industry, as most positioning literature tends to focus on involvement or on the label itself. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing and Management of Wine and Consumer Choice)
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