Special Issue "Solvent-Free Extraction Methods for the Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds in Beverages"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Giacomo Luigi Petretto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dept. of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Sassari,Via Vienna, 2,07100, Sassari, Italy
Interests: Gas-chromatography; Solvent free extraction methods for the analysis of volatiles; Chemical characterization of food and natural products; Antioxidant capacity evaluation of extracts; Wine aroma compounds
Dr. Alberto Mannu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Turin, Turin, Italy
Interests: food wastes; chemometrics; food quality assessment; wine classification
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The study of the volatile chemical composition of beverages has a potential role in several fields, such as food/beverage quality, food/beverage authenticity determination, the determination of toxins or dangerous compounds in food, or in the research of markers related to food/beverage production technology.

Sample preparation is a critical step of any analytical procedure since it is a source of errors and artifacts linked to the final analytical result. This step is crucial due to the complexity of the procedure when the concentrations of the target compounds are minimal. The isolation of volatile components from complex mixtures to obtain representative extracts is very difficult. Classical preparation protocols are commonly focused on increasing the detection and quantitation limits of the analytical procedure, and they usually include a preliminary clean-up followed by a pre-concentration step.

Methods of volatiles extraction from beverages display a varying degree of selectivity and effectiveness according to the target molecules and extraction conditions.

Solvent-free extraction methods are the most popular techniques, and are usually aimed to reduce wastes, artifacts, or sample loss. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was introduced in the early 1990s, and was the one of the first solvent-free procedures able to extract organic compounds even if present in very low amounts. At present, several additional techniques are commonly employed, and dynamic headspace extraction (DHS), stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), and headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) are some examples of solvent-free extraction procedures commonly coupled with a gas chromatographic technique.

Considering the aforementioned, the aim of this Special Issue is to collect the most recent studies dealing with the compositional characterization of volatiles from beverages, with a particular emphasis on the extraction method.


Dr. Giacomo Luigi Petretto
Dr. Alberto Mannu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • SPME
  • HSSE
  • DHS
  • SBSE
  • Volatile organic compounds
  • Solvent-free extraction methods

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Use of Pulsed Electric Field as a Low-Temperature and High-Performance “Green” Extraction Technique for the Recovery of High Added Value Compounds from Olive Leaves
Beverages 2021, 7(3), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages7030045 - 01 Jul 2021
Viewed by 475
Abstract
Olive leaves (OLL), an agricultural waste by-product, are considered a significant bioresource of polyphenols, known as bioactive compounds. This study evaluates the pulsed electric field (PEF) technique for the extraction of polyphenols from OLL. The study parameters included a series of “green” solvents [...] Read more.
Olive leaves (OLL), an agricultural waste by-product, are considered a significant bioresource of polyphenols, known as bioactive compounds. This study evaluates the pulsed electric field (PEF) technique for the extraction of polyphenols from OLL. The study parameters included a series of “green” solvents (ethanol, water as well as mixtures of them at a 25% step gradient) and different input values for the pulse duration of PEF. The phytochemical extraction degree was evaluated using total phenol concentration (Folin–Ciocalteu method) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses, while the antioxidant activity was assessed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results obtained from the PEF extracts were compared with those of the extracts produced without the PEF application. The highest PEF effect was observed for aqueous ethanol, 25% v/v, using a pulse duration of 10 μs. The increase in the total polyphenols reached 31.85%, while the increase in the specific metabolites reached 265.67%. The recovery in polyphenols was found to depend on the solvent, the pulse duration of treatment and the structure of the metabolites extracted. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Application of Microwaves as an Advanced Technique for the Development of Sherry Vinegar Macerated with Pineapple
Beverages 2021, 7(2), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages7020018 - 08 Apr 2021
Viewed by 621
Abstract
This work proposes the elaboration of a product based on the maceration of Sherry Vinegar together with pineapple in order to extract certain volatile compounds that can be found in pineapples, giving a final product with new organoleptic properties and increased polyphenolic content. [...] Read more.
This work proposes the elaboration of a product based on the maceration of Sherry Vinegar together with pineapple in order to extract certain volatile compounds that can be found in pineapples, giving a final product with new organoleptic properties and increased polyphenolic content. Maceration trials were carried out with the application of microwaves and ultrasound, which reduced the maceration time from the traditional three-day solid-liquid maceration to just a few minutes. In addition, through maceration, the total polyphenol index increased significantly with respect to unmacerated vinegar, and the volatile profile of the vinegars was significantly modified. The tasting scores placed the pineapple macerated vinegar sample obtained by traditional maceration in the first place with respect to pineapple aroma; however, the microwave extraction samples were better rated in terms of overall quality. It can be concluded that the application of extracting energies, such as microwaves, can be a viable alternative for the production of sherry vinegar macerated with pineapple. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop